RECENT ARTICLES
  • Video: Stunning Pregame Show Tranforms Ice Rink

    by Michael Gaio April 2014

    Last month, Athletic Business introduced our readers to the newest trend hitting sports facilities around North America: venues turning their playing surfaces into a 3-D video displays. The technology behind it is incredible, as are the final results.

  • Atlanta Braves Embrace Smartphone Ticket Scanning

    by Tim Tucker; Staff April 2014

    As technology speeds away from traditional tickets and even from the print-at-home tickets popular in recent seasons, the Braves for the first time are pushing their fans toward paperless entry into the ballpark via a ticket bar code downloaded on a smartphone and presented at the gate.

  • Showtime: Turn Playing Surfaces into 3-D Video Boards

    by Michael Gaio March 2014

    Hardwood ripples. Free-throw lanes rise. Game footage rolls and championship banners unfurl in an unexpected space — the playing surface. Welcome to the next generation of in-arena entertainment.

  • Analytics Focus Shifts from Creating Stats to Using Them

    by Sean Highkin, @highkin March 2014

    At the recent 2014 MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference in Boston, it was clear that the future lies not in creating new stats but in using numbers to augment traditional scouting.

  • Technology Facilitates Tracking of MLB Fans, Players

    by FRANK SERAVALLI March 2014

    Baseball's first in-ballpark advance to change the way the game was consumed by fans was made here 80 years ago, when Fenway Park installed lights to indicate balls and strikes in the Green Monster scoreboard in 1934.

  • The Fitness App You Need When Traveling

    by Mary Helen Sprecher July 2013

    I don't mind telling you that I have a smartphone, but I'm not very smart about it. It has just enough apps to confuse me.

  • Nebraska Researchers Working on 10-Minute Concussion Test

    by Emily Attwood July 2013

    Researchers at the University of Nebraska are developing a tool that could rule out or confirm a concussion within 10 minutes. The device, a functional MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) machine, would use an electrode net placed on an athlete's head to monitor brain activity in response to various stimuli. Based on subtle changes in blood flow, team medical professionals will be able to determine within minutes whether an athlete is concussed, and if so, how severely.

  • New York Adds Solar-Powered Charging Stations to Parks

    by Emily Attwood June 2013

    Parks in New York will soon have a new amenity to draw users: solar-powered charging stations. Tested out last year in Brooklyn, a total of 25 locations are planned to open throughout the city this summer.

  • Athletic Business Magazine for iPad Now Available

    by Michael Gaio June 2013

    Getting your hands on the best content in the athletic, fitness and recreation industries just got easier. Rather than wait for Athletic Business to arrive in your mailbox each month, get it instantly on your iPad.

  • Smartphones Newest Tool in Concussion Testing

    by Emily Attwood April 2013

    The latest advancements in technology have opened another door for advancements in concussion diagnostics, as well. Researchers at the University of Notre Dame have developed a software program that can turn a tablet or smartphone into an on-the-spot concussion diagnostic tool simply by analyzing the speech patterns of the person suspected of having a concussion.
    "This project is a great example of how mobile computing and sensing technologies can transform healthcare," says Christian Poellabauer, an associate professor of computer science and engineering who was part of the team that developed the software. "More important, because almost 90 percent of concussions go unrecognized, this technology offers tremendous potential to reduce the impact of concussive and sub-concussive hits to the head."

    The program still requires baseline testing, though less rigorous and involved than testing that uses MRI or CT scan imaging. Athletes record a voice sample before a game using a smartphone or tablet equipped with the software program. Should a brain injury be suspected, the player is asked to repeat a selection of words that the software analyzes for signs of brain trauma, which could include distorted vowels, hyper nasality or imprecise consonants.