• Buffalo-Shaped Pool Draws Variety of Colorado Students

    by Paul Steinbach August 2014

    A small component of the University of Colorado Boulder Student Recreation Center's 300,000-square-foot renovation and expansion produced some fairly substantial debate.

  • Three Shocked by Electric Current, Philly Pool Shut Down

    by Rexford Sheild August 2014

    Experiencing weather between 70 and 80 degrees on Friday, some Philadelphia residents were not able to enjoy one city-owned pool. Three children were reportedly shocked by an electrical current running through the water, prompting O'Connor Pool to be shut down temporarily. 

  • Key Considerations When Building a Splash Pad

    by Paul Steinbach August 2014

    They're bubbling up from Texas to Minnesota and from coast to coast as complements to traditional dry playgrounds and existing pools, as well as stand-alone aquatics amenities replacing traditional pools altogether. For many municipalities, both urban and suburban, splash pads offer a simpler, more affordable aquatics recreation alternative.

  • Pool Fumes Hospitalize 22 Near Montreal

    by Andrew Brandt July 2014

    Fumes coming from a public pool just outside of Montreal sent 22 people to the hospital Tuesday afternoon.

  • Planning, Training Key to Protecting Aquatic Venues

    by July 2014

    Editor's note: This story originally appeared in Sports Venue Safety, a new supplement to Athletic Business. View the entire Sports Venue Safety digital issue here.

    Sean Sepela has spent most of his life around water — as a swimmer, certified lifeguard, swim coach, and currently as the aquatics operations manager at George Mason University. As Sepela has immersed himself deeper into the aquatics world, he has recognized the evolving challenges aquatic facilities are facing today compared to years past. "There are a lot more concerns today compared to when I first started," he says. "Those 'what-if' situations we simply thought about years ago must be evaluated, assessed and trained for to ensure the safety of our swimmers and the facility itself."

  • Boy’s Drowning Sparks Call for Age Restriction Changes

    by Emily Attwood June 2014

    How young is too young to be swimming alone at a public pool? That is the question being asked in Cincinnati following the drowning of a 10-year-old boy last week. The boy was unresponsive when lifeguards pulled him from the pool at Bush Recreation Center and began emergency response procedures. He was transported to a local hospital, where he died over the weekend. 

  • Adding Warmth, Sound-Dampening to an Aquatic Center

    by Paul Steinbach June 2014

    MacLennan Jaunkalns Miller Architects has been introducing wood to indoor aquatic environments for 20 years — starting with decks, then moving to wall cladding and ultimately ceilings.

  • Online Training for Your Aquatics Team

    by AB Staff June 2014

    Athletic Business presents a fast, easy way to introduce commercial pool management to your new and part-time employees.

    AB has teamed up with the National Swimming Pool Foundation to offer the Pool Operator Primer™ online learning course. This course is an intensive 8-hour learning experience that will give your new hires the information they need to immediately contribute to your aquatics program. The interactive course makes use of the latest learning technology by incorporating engaging video demonstrations and knowledge quizzes to help participants retain the useful information. 

    The essential responsibilities your team will learn:

    • Facility safety and recordkeeping
    • Water contamination and disinfection
    • Aquatic facility maintenance tips
    • Water circulation and filtration
    • Water chemistry concepts and calculations
    • Unique responsibilities of managing hot tubs and therapy pools

    — Click to Purchase the Pool Operator Primer —

    Earn CEUs

    The experts at the National Swimming Pool Foundation designed this self-paced curriculum. Upon completion graduates will be awarded .85 hours of Continuing Education Units (CEUs).

    Bonus! Receive the National Swimming Pool Foundation’s Pool & Spa Operator Handbook

    Register for our online course and get the most widely used resource manual in the aquatics industry.  It's a great tool that is perfect for everyone at your facility. This useful manual contains all the best information, facts, checklists and references on planning, maintenance, safety, research, and much more.  You’ll refer to this thick volume for years to come.

    — Click to Purchase the Pool Operator Primer  —


  • A Call to Action for the Aquatics Industry

    by Eric Herman June 2014

    Last week I couldn’t help but notice this year’s Memorial Day observance took place just days after the breaking news about the falsified records scandal at VA hospitals. In a world filled with brutal ironies, that one was a doozy! 

    Naturally, the timing led to all sorts of political finger-pointing and moral handwringing about how we’re failing in our duty to assist our wounded service people. Although that simple observation is something most people probably believe in, it’s equally apparent that without action, even the most well- intended rhetoric does little, if any good at all. 

    As is true for many, Memorial Day is a really big deal for my family. My dad is an Air Force Vietnam vet; my stepfather a Word War II Navy vet; and my grandfather served as a Marine in both WWII and Korea. As my thoughts were with these heroes — all of who remain healthfully extant — and their brothers and sisters in arms who haven’t been so fortunate, I realized that the aquatics industry is perfectly positioned to offer assistance in this current crisis of care.

    RELATED: Military Veterans Find Success in Fitness Industry

    For many wounded warriors, aquatic therapy stands as one of the most effective means of treating both physical and mental injuries. Community aquatic centers, YMCAs, university facilities and others should take the lead in making free access to such facilities for veterans a top priority. And better still, wouldn’t it be great if such facilities programmed use with war-injured veterans in mind? That could be as simple as reserving a couple swim lanes exclusively for vets during certain times, or as involved as bringing in therapists to volunteer their time and services. Facility owners and managers might even consider reaching out to VA hospitals and clinics as partners to make aquatic exercise more readily available to those vets who need it most. 

    On a purely self-serving level, I can’t think of a more noble or effective way to promote the profound health benefits of water-based rehabilitation. The fact is, catering to our active and retired servicemen and women would be spectacular PR. It’s exactly the kind of exposure our industry needs. Beyond that interest, however, is the reality that opening doors to vets could do genuine good for those who are unfortunately being underserved by the institutions designed to help them. 

    Keep in mind that our most recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have demonstrated how modern medical science can keep severely wounded soldiers alive. Ultimately those advances in lifesaving procedures and technology put more burden and responsibility on society at large to take care of these brave souls as they move forward in their post-military lives or seek to re-enter active duty. 

    In saying all this, I realize there are already many facilities moving in this direction, and the call to action is being heard across the aquatics industry. In preparing this discussion, I found the following passage in an article on the website for the Aquatic Exercise Association by Will Corley, an undergraduate in the Exercise Physiology program at West Virginia University: 

    Many different injuries are seen in returning veterans of modern warfare. Since the invasion of Iraq and Afghanistan, 50,420 United States service members have been wounded in action. Injuries range from chronic lower back pain to multiple limb amputations due to the large forces of present day weapons. Cognitive impairments, such as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), can make a veteran’s return difficult as well. These injuries and mental disorders can be managed using aquatic therapy and exercise programs… but are there enough nationwide?

    READ MORE: Water Warriors

    For those owners and managers who might not have given the idea any thought, however, maybe the time is nigh. 

    For those of us who aren’t in a position to institute such programs, we can always use our voices to support the idea of opening up aquatic centers to vets, free of charge. You might also consider hosting a fundraiser or donating to the Wounded Warrior Project, which is doing important work helping our wounded service personnel integrate into society. 

    There is always some way you can help. 

    There is no one-size-fits-all solution when it comes to meeting wounded vet needs. Given the flexibility and power of aquatic therapy, however, our industry is arguably well positioned to offer an important and helpful part of the answer. 

    Eric Herman is senior editor of AB's sister publication AQUA magazine.


  • Athletic Business Architectural Showcase 2014 Map

    by AB Staff June 2014

    View 2014 AB showcase locations in a full screen map

    This year marks the 27th year of Athletic Business's Architectural Showcase and 29th Facility of Merit awards program. The University of Tennessee's Neyland Stadium graced the cover of the first "Showcase on Architecture" as it was initially called, one of 45 facilities to be highlighted in the June 1988 issue.

    Not surprisingly, facilities have gotten bigger and more expensive since our first Showcase — there is a more than $100 million difference between the most expensive project this year and its counterpart in 1988 — but there's still room for smaller projects. College projects continue to dominate the market, though preferences have changed — a campus-rec standard today, climbing walls were all but nonexistent in facilities of the '80s.