RECENT ARTICLES
  • Connecticut Town Settles P.E. Drowning Case for $1.5M

    by Michael Popke — AB Managing Editor January 2013

    The town of East Hartford, Conn., has agreed to pay a $1.5 million settlement to the family of 15-year-old Marcum Asiamah, a physical education student who drowned in the local high school pool last year. According to The Hartford Courant, the town's insurer will pay $1 million and the town will pay a $500,000 deductible (which will reportedly be taken from the board of education's budget).

  • How Step Into Swim Can Help Aquatics Facilities

    by Michael Popke December 2012

    During the final months of 2012, bad news for community pools hit residents like a crashing belly flop:

  • Blog: Why Do College Kids Whine About Swimming?

    by Michael Popke — AB Managing Editor December 2012

    Given the excitement surrounding the Athletic Business Conference & Expo last week, you might have missed a front-page story in Thursday's Wall Street Journal about colleges and universities requiring students to either pass a swimming test or take a beginner's learn-to-swim class in order to graduate. Not everyone is a fan of the prerequisites. "I guess it's a noble skill to have," 21-year-old Jessica McSweeney, a senior Human Development major at Cornell University, told reporter Melissa Korn. "But I don't intend to be a water-going person."

  • ABC: How to Keep Your Pool From Becoming Obsolete

    by Michael Popke — AB Managing Editor November 2012

    The number of pool starts in the United States dropped by more than 70 percent between 2008 and 2011, according to market research firm PK Data. And even though the industry appears to have hit bottom and is on its way back up this year, aquatic facility operators still face plenty of challenges.

  • School Removes P.E. Swim Curriculum After Drowning

    by Michael Popke — AB Managing Editor November 2012

    Manchester (Conn.) High School's pool has been shut down and its physical education swimming unit removed indefinitely, following the Nov. 21 drowning of a freshman boy.

  • Time to Rethink How Pool Operators Protect Swimmers?

    by Michael Popke June 2012

    The pool of excuses for not knowing how to swim shrinks every year. Last month, the third annual World's Largest Swimming Lesson™, held at more than 100 aquatic facilities across the United States, attempted to teach an estimated 20,000 people to swim — for free.

  • Recent Tragedies Put New Focus on Shallow Water Blackout

    by Michael Popke — AB Managing Editor August 2011

    The July deaths of two 21-year-old men in a Staten Island, N.Y., public pool brought increased attention to shallow water blackout - a largely unknown and potentially fatal condition that occurs when an insufficient amount of carbon dioxide is available to activate the body's natural impulse to breathe. Swimmers and free divers who practice prolonged underwater breath-holding are particularly at risk.

  • Second Man Dies in Staten Island Breath-Holding Accident

    by Michael Popke — AB Managing Editor July 2011

    A second man has died following an underwater training accident at a public pool on Staten Island. The New York Daily News reports that 21-year-old off-duty lifeguard Jonathan Proce died Sunday at New York Presbyterian Hospital following an exercise at Lyons Pool last Wednesday in which he and his friend, Bohdan Vitenko, also 21, were practicing underwater breath-holding.

  • Communities Find Alternatives to Eliminating Learn-to-Swim Programs

    by Michael Popke April 2011

    Five years ago, KNIK Aquatics, a USA Swimming club based in Anchorage, Alaska, took over the city's learn-to-swim program at Bartlett Pool, the state's only 50-meter facility.

  • Model Health Code Making Waves in the Aquatics Industry

    by Nicholas Brown January 2011

    A former manager of aquatics for the state of Wisconsin's health department, Tracynda Davis has inspected her fair share of recreational pools, and she knows all too well how pool operators respond to notifications of code violations.