RECENT ARTICLES
  • Offensive Tempo Debate Divides SEC Football Coaches

    by Paul Myerberg, and George Schroeder, USA Today July 2014

    Gary Pinkel's up-tempo experience dates to the summer of 2005, when Missouri, reeling after a disappointing season, opted to implement the unorthodox approach then gaining a foothold within the Big 12 Conference. The result has been a near decade of historic success: Missouri found an offense, discovered an identity and rolled through the most productive era in program history, essentially parlaying its successes into a spot in the Southeastern Conference, where the Tigers won 12 games and the East Division title a season ago. This experience has placed Pinkel in the SEC's pro-tempo camp, particularly when it comes to the debate's most contentious theory: That a quicker, no-huddle approach places offensive and defensive players alike at an increased risk of injury.

  • KHSAA Recommends Softball Players Wear Facemasks

    by Rexford Sheild, Athletic Business Intern July 2014

    As safety has become a bigger priority at every level of sports, the state of Kentucky is considering taking things even further for its high school softball players. The Kentucky High School Athletic Association (KHSAA) voted to recommend that softball players playing first base, third base and pitcher wear protective face gear during games.

  • How to Manage Concussions in Athletics

    by Harry Kerasidis, M.D. July 2014

    Kudos are in order for the National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) for updating its position statement on the management of sports concussions, originally published in 2004. NATA's intent to provide more comprehensive guidance is critical today as athletic programs across the United States contend with the rapid convergence of concussion awareness, legal compliance and the short- and long-term risks associated with brain trauma.

  • Neurologists Stress Better Care for Concussion Patients

    by Andrew Brandt, Athletic Business Intern July 2014

    Just in time for the Sports Concussion Conference, the American Academy of Neurology, known as one of the leaders in managing sports concussions, has released a new position paper on how doctors should care for those who suffer one.

  • Family of Boy Killed at Football Camp Settles for $1M

    by Heath Hamacher July 2014

    A week before a wrongful death case was set to go to trial, the family of a 15-year-old boy killed in 2011 during a football camp agreed to a $1 million settlement.

  • NCAA Recommends Limited Football Practice Contact

    by Schuyler Dixon, The Associated Press July 2014

    The NCAA is suggesting that football teams hold no more than two contact practices per week during the season in guidelines that grew out of a safety and concussion summit early this year.

  • Tuesday Takedown: Collegiate Safety Best Practices

    by Dennis Van Milligen July 2014

    NCS4 kicked off its annual conference and expo Monday with the formal introduction of its Intercollegiate Athletics Safety and Security Best Practices Guide. The 100-plus page "living" document is the result of collegiate security and safety leaders brainstorming ideas at NCS4's first National Intercollegiate Athletics Safety and Security Summit last January at the University of Southern Mississippi, according to symposium moderator Paul Denton, chief of police at Ohio State University.

  • New Study Finds Girls More Likely to Tear ACL

    by Nicole Villalpando July 2014

    In the U.S. study, girls playing the same sport as boys are 2.5 to 6.2 times more likely to have an ACL injury than boys. In a Norwegian study, girls ages 10-19 had a 76 in 100,000 chance of tearing their ACL; boys in that same age range had a 47 in 100,000 chance of the same injury.

  • Should Kids and Preteens Pump Iron?

    by David Quick July 2014

    In the past two decades, strength training once the bastion of competitive weight lifters, bodybuilders, football players and pro rasslers has slowly become acceptable and even embraced by women, business professionals, senior citizens and even skinny runners. All, for the most part, were once averse to bulking up but now can t ignore the benefits of building lean muscle mass on metabolism, bone health and muscle tone. But one group that seems to be left out of benefits of building strength remains children and young adolescents, despite the fact that respected organizations have proclaimed it is both safe and healthy. In 2008, the American Academy of Pediatrics came out with a policy statement on strength training for children and teens declaring it to be safe, within limits, for children as young as 7.

  • Opinion: City Erred in Not Warning Public of Park Toxins

    by The Columbus Dispatch July 2014

    Columbus Mayor Michael B. Coleman's order to conduct health surveys of residents near a city park tainted with toxins is a step toward restoring trust and assuaging fear, especially since neighbors now know the city was aware of the problem for far longer than it had acknowledged.