RECENT ARTICLES
  • Is There a Safe Age to Start Heading Soccer Balls?

    by Todd Milewski, The Capital Times July 2014

    How young is too young for soccer players to be heading the ball? A group wants the practice to be delayed until players have reached the age of 14 to help reduce the risk of brain injuries, but universal acceptance won't be easy. Former U.S. women's World Cup stars and brain injury specialists have teamed up to form Parents and Pros for Safer Soccer, which is advocating for a later start for heading in the game.

  • Toxins in Active Soccer Fields Known About for Years

    by Mark Ferenchik, The Columbus Dispatch June 2014

    City and state officials knew as early as 2011 that Saunders Park contained elevated levels of arsenic and lead, according to surface-soil tests. But Columbus Recreation and Parks decided to allow city youth soccer teams to play at the Near East Side park in 2012 and 2013. "We didn't have complete information to know if it was a problem," said Alan McKnight, Recreation and Parks director. "We felt we need to do more study to understand what it meant."

  • NFL Alum Turner Paid High Price for $5M NFL Settlement

    by Ron Borges June 2014

    Kevin Turner, like anyone receiving a $5 million windfall, would have been happy to talk about it yesterday. Only one problem: He can't talk well enough anymore to be understood over the phone. Such are the ravages of ALS, commonly known as Lou Gehrig's Disease and more commonly known as a death sentence. In Turner's case, it's all tied together. His days in the NFL as a crushing lead blocker led to so many concussions he can't recall them all. It also led the fullback to be among the most admired players in the league when the topic was stone toughness. Yet there was a price to pay, as there is for all things. In Turner's case the brain trauma he suffered plying his trade led to being diagnosed with ALS four years ago, and yesterday that won him a hard-earned $5 million settlement he can no longer speak about. So for several hours he exchanged texts from a hotel room in Washington with an old friend about the announcement that the concussion lawsuit between more than 4,500 retired players and the NFL had been settled again. This time, the league agreeing to an uncapped monetary figure for damages without admitting guilt to anything, while the plaintiffs agreed to allow unlimited appeals of individual cases.

  • NFL Agrees to Lift Cap on Concussion Settlements

    by Jeremy Roebuck; Inquirer Staff Writer June 2014

    The NFL agreed Wednesday to lift the $675 million cap on its settlement offer to former players suffering from concussion-related injuries - a move that league officials hoped would satisfy a federal judge who rejected an earlier plan over concerns that the money wouldn't last.

  • Parent Behavior, Cyberbullying Hurting High School Sportsmanship

    by Dennis Van Milligen June 2014

    It is widely acknowledged that the role of high school athletics is to promote life-skills education through sports, but lately a key life skill in this equation — sportsmanship — has deteriorated on the interscholastic level to the point that one high school athletic association recently considered banning the time-honored post-game handshake.

  • Chiropractors, Doctors at Odds Over New Concussion Law

    by Laura A. Bischoff June 2014

    Tanya Clark of Harrison Twp. talks to her son, Justin, at a summer league basketball game. Justin Clark, a 2013 Chaminade Julienne High School graduate, suffered a concussion during a 2012 game . COLUMBUS - Ohio's new law requiring that young athletes be pulled from practice or play if they appear to have suffered a concussion is likely to get a mini-makeover because of a dispute over who should be allowed to clear injured kids to return to competition. Chiropractors want in on the action. Medical doctors want to keep them on the sidelines, saying that chiropractors lack the training and expertise to diagnose and treat brain injuries in young athletes.

  • Free Youth Event Includes Baseline Concussion Test

    by Pamela Dillon June 2014

    Your family can have some serious fun this weekend. Serious, because parents can receive loads of good information about sports injuries to get their kids back on the playing field much faster.

  • Fifth Record Sought at World's Largest Swimming Lesson

    by Michelle Piasecki Special to The Palm Beach Post June 2014

    When as many as 80 children ages 3 to 14 take a dip in the cool waters at YMCA pool in Stuart at 11 a.m. Friday to learn swimming techniques, they will know they aren't alone. The children, their instructors as well as another group at Sailfish Splash Water Park across town will be part of the World's Largest Swimming Lesson. The 30-minute lesson is expected to surpass last year's world record of 32,450 swimmers at 432 facilities in 13 different countries all learning to swim at one time. So far, there are more than 800 locations in 26 countries signed up to participate with an estimated 50,000 participants.

  • Sensor Project to Expand from Two NFL Teams to All 32

    by Tom Pelissero, @TomPelissero, USA TODAY Sports June 2014

    More NFL players are likely to wear sensors that assess head impact in games this season as the league and the NFL Players Association expand a project proponents hope will help them tackle the concussion issue.

  • USA Hockey Policy Statement on the Look-Up Line

    by Super User June 2014

    Source: USA Hockey

    The USA Hockey Board of Directors approved the Policy below regarding the Look-Up Line at the Saturday June 7th, 2014 Board Meeting.  Installation of the Look-Up Line is not required under USA Hockey rules, and USA Hockey has not taken a position about whether the Look-Up Line should be recommended.  The specific policy passed by the USA Hockey Board of Directors is as follows: