RECENT ARTICLES
  • Family of Boy Killed at Football Camp Settles for $1M

    by Heath Hamacher July 2014

    A week before a wrongful death case was set to go to trial, the family of a 15-year-old boy killed in 2011 during a football camp agreed to a $1 million settlement.

  • NCAA Recommends Limited Football Practice Contact

    by Schuyler Dixon, The Associated Press July 2014

    The NCAA is suggesting that football teams hold no more than two contact practices per week during the season in guidelines that grew out of a safety and concussion summit early this year.

  • Tuesday Takedown: Collegiate Safety Best Practices

    by Dennis Van Milligen July 2014

    NCS4 kicked off its annual conference and expo Monday with the formal introduction of its Intercollegiate Athletics Safety and Security Best Practices Guide. The 100-plus page "living" document is the result of collegiate security and safety leaders brainstorming ideas at NCS4's first National Intercollegiate Athletics Safety and Security Summit last January at the University of Southern Mississippi, according to symposium moderator Paul Denton, chief of police at Ohio State University.

  • New Study Finds Girls More Likely to Tear ACL

    by Nicole Villalpando July 2014

    In the U.S. study, girls playing the same sport as boys are 2.5 to 6.2 times more likely to have an ACL injury than boys. In a Norwegian study, girls ages 10-19 had a 76 in 100,000 chance of tearing their ACL; boys in that same age range had a 47 in 100,000 chance of the same injury.

  • Should Kids and Preteens Pump Iron?

    by David Quick July 2014

    In the past two decades, strength training once the bastion of competitive weight lifters, bodybuilders, football players and pro rasslers has slowly become acceptable and even embraced by women, business professionals, senior citizens and even skinny runners. All, for the most part, were once averse to bulking up but now can t ignore the benefits of building lean muscle mass on metabolism, bone health and muscle tone. But one group that seems to be left out of benefits of building strength remains children and young adolescents, despite the fact that respected organizations have proclaimed it is both safe and healthy. In 2008, the American Academy of Pediatrics came out with a policy statement on strength training for children and teens declaring it to be safe, within limits, for children as young as 7.

  • Opinion: City Erred in Not Warning Public of Park Toxins

    by The Columbus Dispatch July 2014

    Columbus Mayor Michael B. Coleman's order to conduct health surveys of residents near a city park tainted with toxins is a step toward restoring trust and assuaging fear, especially since neighbors now know the city was aware of the problem for far longer than it had acknowledged.

  • Is There a Safe Age to Start Heading Soccer Balls?

    by Todd Milewski, The Capital Times July 2014

    How young is too young for soccer players to be heading the ball? A group wants the practice to be delayed until players have reached the age of 14 to help reduce the risk of brain injuries, but universal acceptance won't be easy. Former U.S. women's World Cup stars and brain injury specialists have teamed up to form Parents and Pros for Safer Soccer, which is advocating for a later start for heading in the game.

  • Toxins in Active Soccer Fields Known About for Years

    by Mark Ferenchik, The Columbus Dispatch June 2014

    City and state officials knew as early as 2011 that Saunders Park contained elevated levels of arsenic and lead, according to surface-soil tests. But Columbus Recreation and Parks decided to allow city youth soccer teams to play at the Near East Side park in 2012 and 2013. "We didn't have complete information to know if it was a problem," said Alan McKnight, Recreation and Parks director. "We felt we need to do more study to understand what it meant."

  • NFL Alum Turner Paid High Price for $5M NFL Settlement

    by Ron Borges June 2014

    Kevin Turner, like anyone receiving a $5 million windfall, would have been happy to talk about it yesterday. Only one problem: He can't talk well enough anymore to be understood over the phone. Such are the ravages of ALS, commonly known as Lou Gehrig's Disease and more commonly known as a death sentence. In Turner's case, it's all tied together. His days in the NFL as a crushing lead blocker led to so many concussions he can't recall them all. It also led the fullback to be among the most admired players in the league when the topic was stone toughness. Yet there was a price to pay, as there is for all things. In Turner's case the brain trauma he suffered plying his trade led to being diagnosed with ALS four years ago, and yesterday that won him a hard-earned $5 million settlement he can no longer speak about. So for several hours he exchanged texts from a hotel room in Washington with an old friend about the announcement that the concussion lawsuit between more than 4,500 retired players and the NFL had been settled again. This time, the league agreeing to an uncapped monetary figure for damages without admitting guilt to anything, while the plaintiffs agreed to allow unlimited appeals of individual cases.

  • NFL Agrees to Lift Cap on Concussion Settlements

    by Jeremy Roebuck; Inquirer Staff Writer June 2014

    The NFL agreed Wednesday to lift the $675 million cap on its settlement offer to former players suffering from concussion-related injuries - a move that league officials hoped would satisfy a federal judge who rejected an earlier plan over concerns that the money wouldn't last.