RECENT ARTICLES
  • Balance Test Proving Effective in Concussion Evaluation

    by Emily Attwood December 2012

    The University of Mississippi Medical Center is adding another tool to its concussion testing protocol. The Computerized Dynamic Posturography device has been commonly used to evaluate balance issues, but only recently has been found to be effective in detecting lingering signs of concussion, which can cause impaired balance. The test is especially useful in diagnosis of athletes who exhibit or claim to exhibit no symptoms.

  • U. of Iowa Climbing Wall Closed After Student Falls

    by Emily Attwood November 2012

    The rock climbing wall at the University of Iowa is closed indefinitely after a fall landed one student in the hospital on Nov. 9. Business student Spencer Bean, an experienced climber who is also an employee of the Campus Recreation and Wellness Center, fell 30 feet, landing upright on his feet. He remained conscious and coherent for a few moments before passing out.

  • Survey: More Parents Paying for High School Protective Gear

    by Michael Popke — AB Managing Editor October 2012

    An estimated half of high school coaches and athletic directors say their budgets for purchasing protective sports equipment have been reduced during the past three years, according to a recent survey conducted by the National Sporting Goods Association. Approximately 400 participants responded to the survey, which covered baseball, football, boys' and girls' ice hockey, boys' and girls' lacrosse, and softball.

  • Playing with Concussion: Evaluation Criteria, 'Tough Guy' Mentality to Blame

    by Emily Attwood October 2012

    Detroit Lions receiver Calvin Johnson took a helmet-to-helmet hit in a game against the Minnesota Vikings on Sept. 30. After undergoing a series of tests per the NFL's concussion protocol, medical personnel cleared him to return to the game.

  • Blog: Running As Punishment Does Nobody Any Good

    by Michael Popke — AB Managing Editor October 2012

    When I played freshman basketball at a Catholic high school in Wisconsin back in the 1980s, one of my teammates earned the nickname "Plop" because of the sound his flat feet made when we ran laps around the gym. I remember running laps around that gym with "Plop" and the rest of my teammates a lot, often as punishment for forgotten indiscretions; in fact, the running is what sticks out most about that season - which was my last playing organized hoops.

  • N.H. School Board Member Proposes Killing Football Program

    by Michael Popke — AB Managing Editor October 2012

    A proposal to ban high school football in Dover, N.H., a small city in the state's southeastern corner, has taken the community - including Dover High School athletic director Peter Wotton - by surprise. "I sure would like to believe [football will survive]," he told Foster's Daily Democrat. "Just the idea of what football is - it's an event. It entails the band, the cheerleaders, the community. That's what makes football so different from the other sports. Good and bad."

  • Helmets at the Center of Battle to Tame Concussions

    by Michael Popke August 2012

    No football season in memory has begun with as much emphasis on helmet safety at nearly all levels of the game as the 2012 campaign. Pop Warner Football has banned head-to-head hits.

  • New Youth Football Concussion Policies Emphasize Prevention, Education

    by Emily Attwood August 2012

    Football safety has progressed by leaps and bounds since the days when the "flying wedge" - the human battering ram linked to multiple deaths in the game each year during the late 19th century - was officially outlawed.

  • States Seek to Ensure Student-Athlete Safety in High Heat

    by Michael Popke June 2012

    July 26 marks the one-year anniversary of what Douglas Casa, a leading expert on exertional heat illness, called "the worst week in the last 35 years in terms of athlete deaths."

  • Study Finds Similar Brain Damage in Soldiers, Athletes

    by Emily Attwood May 2012

    What do athletes and military veterans have in common? Blasts from explosions may put soldiers at risk for chronic traumatic encephalopathy, the same degenerative brain disease suffered by athletes after multiple concussions or head impacts. A study conducted by Boston University in conjunction with the Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System examined the brain tissue of young veterans, comparing it to those of young athletes exhibiting signs of CTE, and found nearly identical abnormalities.