RECENT ARTICLES
  • Neurologists Stress Better Care for Concussion Patients

    by Andrew Brandt, Athletic Business Intern July 2014

    Just in time for the Sports Concussion Conference, the American Academy of Neurology, known as one of the leaders in managing sports concussions, has released a new position paper on how doctors should care for those who suffer one.

  • Tuesday Takedown: Collegiate Safety Best Practices

    by Dennis Van Milligen July 2014

    NCS4 kicked off its annual conference and expo Monday with the formal introduction of its Intercollegiate Athletics Safety and Security Best Practices Guide. The 100-plus page "living" document is the result of collegiate security and safety leaders brainstorming ideas at NCS4's first National Intercollegiate Athletics Safety and Security Summit last January at the University of Southern Mississippi, according to symposium moderator Paul Denton, chief of police at Ohio State University.

  • Parent Behavior, Cyberbullying Hurting High School Sportsmanship

    by Dennis Van Milligen June 2014

    It is widely acknowledged that the role of high school athletics is to promote life-skills education through sports, but lately a key life skill in this equation — sportsmanship — has deteriorated on the interscholastic level to the point that one high school athletic association recently considered banning the time-honored post-game handshake.

  • USA Hockey Policy Statement on the Look-Up Line

    by Super User June 2014

    Source: USA Hockey

    The USA Hockey Board of Directors approved the Policy below regarding the Look-Up Line at the Saturday June 7th, 2014 Board Meeting.  Installation of the Look-Up Line is not required under USA Hockey rules, and USA Hockey has not taken a position about whether the Look-Up Line should be recommended.  The specific policy passed by the USA Hockey Board of Directors is as follows:

  • NATA to Help Increase Medical Services in Underserved High Schools

    by Super User May 2014

    Source: National Athletic Trainers’ Association 

    WASHINGTON, DC, May 29, 2014 –The National Athletic Trainers’ Association, in collaboration with the Professional Football Athletic Trainers’ Society, will support a national initiative to place athletic trainers (ATs) in underserved high schools in NFL markets during the 2014 football season. The National Football League Foundation and NFL teams will provide $1 million, with the NATA adding another $125,000, to improve the health and welfare of those student athletes. The announcement was made during the White House Healthy Kids and Concussion Summit in Washington, DC, this morning.

  • Seven Sports Safety Questions Every Parent Should Ask

    by AB Staff May 2014

    Editor's Note: In response to the story Athletic Business published on May 19 titled, "School Districts Grapple with Youth Tackle Football Safety," the National Athletic Trainers' Association sent us the following release which we wanted to pass on to our readers.

  • Study: Concussions May Lead to Smaller Brain Volume

    by May 2014

    A new study published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association suggests college football players with concussion histories may have smaller brain volumes and slower reaction times than players with fewer years of experience.

    The study, conducted by the Laureate Institute for Brain Research (LIBR), looked at 25 college football players that already had a history of concussions and compared them to 25 college football players who had not suffered concussions and 25 non-football-playing control participants. Researchers then measured brain function using an MRI machine, while the participants took computerized cognitive tests.

    According to the research, the 25 college football players with previous concussion history had the smallest hippocampal volume when all three groups were compared. 

    The hippocampus is the brain region responsible for regulating emotion and storing and processing memory. The results may indicate that this region of the brain is particularly sensitive to mild traumatic brain injuries. 

    Beyond the impact that traumatic brain injuries can have on the hippocampus, the football players with more football experience also experienced slower reaction times than younger players. While the study itself could not provide any answers to this question, the researchers believe that the physical and psychological stressors that college athletes experience during their careers could be a factor. 

    Due to the small sample size, the study cannot make any definitive claims, but the researchers hope that it will serve as a starting point for further research into the effects of concussions on young athletes.

    “Other studies have evaluated the effects on older athletes, such as retired NFL players, but no one has studied 20-year-olds until now — and the results were remarkable and surprising,” the Director of Cognitive Neuroscience for LIBR, Patrick S.F. Bellgowan, told the University of Tulsa. “Our next step is to assess what caused this difference in hippocampus size.”

  • Technology, Collaboration Key to Protecting Open-Access Events

    by Dennis Van Milligen April 2014

    No one anticipated — no one could have anticipated — what happened on that day," recalls Boston Police Commissioner William Evans. An avid runner with more than 40 marathons under his belt, including last year's Boston Marathon, Evans has been preparing harder for this year's Boston Marathon than any other race he's run. But unlike previous years, his morning runs with a member of the Boston Athletic Association aren't meant as training for his participation in the race; they are meant as preparation for his more daunting task of protecting the race.

  • NJ High Schools Preparing for New Safety Mandates

    by Michael Gaio April 2014

    New Jersey high schools will soon have new rules in place aimed at keeping student-athletes safer.

  • Navy Freshman Dies After Collapse at Football Practice

    by Michael Gaio March 2014

    Navy freshman football player Will McKamey died while in a coma Tuesday night, three days after he collapsed during a Midshipmen football practice. He was 19.