RECENT ARTICLES
  • Ex-Softball Player Sues Over Alleged Hazing

    by Scott O'Connell June 2016

    A former member of Worcester Polytechnic Institute’s women’s softball team claims in a new lawsuit against the school she was permanently injured in a hazing ritual during spring training last year. Caroline Roch, who has since transferred to another school, also alleges the team’s head coach attempted to cover up the incident. In a civil complaint filed in Worcester Superior Court last week, the New Jersey resident is asking a jury to award her damages for negligence, saying she has spent $118,019 on medical expenses and other costs stemming from her injury, which has left her no longer able to play softball.

  • Schools Push Against Specialization in Sports

    by Eden Laase June 2016

    As athletes begin to focus on a single sport at a young age, problems emerge. According to a new study by the National Strength and Conditioning Association, while not the only problem, this is one of the biggest issues facing youth athletes today.

  • Center Hopes to Revolutionize Concussion Rehab

    by Aaron Falk June 2016

    The Provo-based Cognitive FX has provided care for numerous athletes and other patients dealing with lingering symptoms from concussions, and doctors there believe their rigorous rehabilitation program is on the cutting edge of treatment.

  • College Soccer Player Drowns in Swimming Accident

    by Dayton Daily News June 2016

    Ohio State's men's soccer coach says one of his players drowned while swimming with some of his teammates at a lake outside Columbus.

  • Duerson's Brother Advocates for Concussion Training

    by Adrianna Pitrelli June 2016

    After earning two Super Bowl rings during his 11 years in the NFL, David Duerson suffered from stage-four Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy, a neurodegenerative disease that is linked to concussions.

  • NHL Vets Should Have Injuries Taken Seriously

    by Buffalo News June 2016

    Unlike football, whose on-field violence is mainly part of the game structure, and now shown to cause life-threatening injures, hockey has an additional problem: For decades, the league has tolerated - if not tacitly encouraged - on-ice brawling, an extracurricular distraction that has nothing to do with the sport but which, sadly, helps to put fans in the seats.

  • Using Injury Data to Predict NFL Performance

    by Dr. David Geier June 2016

    Using injury data to predict performance is challenging in football. Dr. Matt Matava, a former president of the NFL Physicians Society, explained to me that unlike baseball and basketball, football players come in all different sizes and have many different duties on the field.

  • County's Concussion Law Would Mandate Safety Courses

    by Sandra Tan; News Staff Reporter June 2016

    The Erie County Legislature is poised to approve a new law that would fine youth sports organizations $100 to $200 if they cannot produce records showing that all of their coaches have taken concussion safety courses either in person,

  • Ex-Wrestler Who Suffered Stroke 'Trapped' in Body

    by Grant Pepper June 2016

    One year after Ahmad Doucet suffered a stroke while practicing front headlocks, the mother of the Kettering Fairmont High School wrestling star says he is "trapped inside his own body."

  • Preventing Heat Stroke Important at Practices

    by Jim Sands June 2016

    News of the tragic death of a Page High School student after collapsing during a voluntary summer football workout last week was a sobering reminder of the serious nature of setting parameters on preventing heat stroke for athletes. Karson Cross, a rising freshman at Page High School in Greensboro, collapsed on the practice field about 20 minutes after the workout began on June 13 shortly after 5 p.m. Despite efforts to resuscitate him, Karson died the following day at a local hospital. Page, which is located in our sister county of Guilford, is a regular rival to Rockingham County schools in many sports. It made Monday's tragedy hit a little too close to home for many in the community.