RECENT ARTICLES
  • Study: Many Big Ten Schools Could Afford to Pay Athletes

    by Jared S. Hopkins and Alex Richards, Chicago Tribune June 2014

    Chicago - Like a five-star high school recruit in his senior year, college athletics is at a crossroads. Pressure from current players, former players and lawsuits means a system of paying college students to play sports is finally getting serious attention. Those pushing to pay athletes argue that schools - and their coaches and administrators-take in billions while the students themselves are left with nothing. The NCAA and school officials have steadfastly rejected that argument, saying most schools can't afford to pay students and doing so could tarnish the principle that players are students first. But the contentious philosophical debate also leads to some basic math questions. Could schools afford to pay their athletes, and how much? An examination by the Tribune of athletic department budgets over the last five years for Big Ten Conference schools shows that they generate tens of millions of dollars in operating surpluses.

  • Opinion: Don't Spend Road Repair Money on Soccer Fields

    by Arizona Daily Star (Tucson) June 2014

    A Pima County proposal to spend $8.75 million to purchase 167 acres for soccer fields makes sense, with a caveat: No road repair money should be touched to pay for it. Pima County Supervisors have already approved a county budget that allows the expenditure to be made, and they will decide July 1 if the land deal should move ahead and how to pay for it. The land is a piece of a much larger proposal to build a regional soccer complex that supporters say would attract soccer tournaments from outside Tucson and Arizona.

  • BYU Coach: Split Divisions Only When Schools in Black

    by Dick Harmon, Deseret News June 2014

    PROVO - If 65 Power 5 athletic programs want to create a new NCAA division, they'd better come through with the coin. Right now, most are not balancing their checkbooks. That's the warning from BYU football coach Bronco Mendenhall, whose school is one of only 25 Division I universities operating in the black. "The issue of 65 breaking off is all because of money. Why not say nobody breaks off unless they are operating in the black? College sports is becoming more and more commercialized and like professional football," said Mendenhall.

  • Town Mistakenly Builds Football Field on Private Property

    by Sun Journal (Lewiston, Maine) June 2014

    SKOWHEGAN -- A Maine town will spend $27,500 to correct mistakes it made that led to a youth football field being accidentally built on private property.

  • Playground Repair Among City's Post-Recession Priorities

    by Art Marroquin, Staff Writer June 2014

    City officials plan to hire 10 police officers, repair playground equipment at parks and upgrade the utility system as part of a $1.6 billion budget for the 2014-15 fiscal year, reflecting a 3.7 percent spending increase over the past year.

  • High School Approves $20M in Athletic, Rec Upgrades

    by JEFF RUMAGE, jrumage@jrn.com June 2014

    Glendale - Nicolet High School will solicit donations to build an improved football field, 13-court tennis complex and a joint recreation facility. Presented with three different renovation options, the Nicolet Union High School District School Board voted unanimously on Monday, June 23 to pursue what has been referred to at a public information meeting as "Option 2," which calls for $17 million to $20 million in fundraising and naming rights donations. The School Board hopes to offset those costs with the sale of the upper field on the opposite side of Interstate 43, which the district expects to generate between $7 million and $10 million.

  • Duration of KU Tickets-for-Bond Deal Questioned

    by Mike Vernon and Jesse Newell, The Capital-Journal June 2014

    This isn't what Andrew Knopp intended to sign the Kansas student body up for. Knopp - KU's student body president from 2003-04 - questions the ethics of KU Athletics in regards to a contract signed in 2004. The contract terms, he says, were never supposed to stretch nearly a quarter-century. In April 2004, Knopp signed a contract with former athletic director Lew Perkins. The main point of the contract was this, according to Knopp: KU Athletics would pay up to $1 million per year for the new recreation center expansion and in exchange would get to sell 1,431 seats in Allen Fieldhouse that previously were student tickets. The swap, according to Knopp, would basically be $1 million for $1 million each year, with Perkins assuring Knopp that KU Athletics could make at least $1 million extra by selling those 1,431 seats as season tickets instead of single-game tickets when those seats went unused by students.

  • City to Borrow $35M for MiLB Park Without Referendum

    by DAWN HINSHAW; dhinshaw@thestate.com June 2014

    COLUMBIA Columbia City Council moved ahead Tuesday on borrowing $35 million for a minor-league baseball stadium, ignoring a last-ditch effort to let voters decide the issue.

  • Officials to Vote on Decomissioning of 24 City Parks

    by Kirsten Crow June 2014

    City officials could begin decommissioning 24 parks, should the council approve a resolution Tuesday declaring that the properties are no longer feasible as parks. A public hearing on the fate of 24 parks will precede the council’s vote.

  • NCAA's Emmert: Pay Could Destroy College Sports

    by The Associated Press June 2014

    NCAA President Mark Emmert stuck to his contention that amateurism is the core of college athletics, saying any effort to pay players would destroy a framework that has been in place for more than a century and cause many schools to either abandon sports or refuse to play other schools that do pay.