RECENT ARTICLES
  • $15M Park Would Host Pickleball, Team Sports, Dogs

    by Alexandra Seltzer Palm Beach Post Staff Writer April 2015

    In the past 11 years, Palm Beach County has not issued a bond referendum for parks and recreation. That could change in 2016, and if it does happen, suburban Boynton Beach could get a district park.

  • District Earmarks $92K for Repair of Three Tracks

    by Lana Sweeten-Shults April 2015

    Athletic tracks have been trod upon over the years at Wichita Falls ISD’s high schools, so the board of trustees during its work session Tuesday at the Education Center looked at giving the facilities a step up.

  • New Orleans Suburb Considers Privatizing City Parks

    by Laura Godlewski April 2015

    A suburb of New Orleans is responding to a drop in participation in its youth sports leagues by privatizing municipal parks, as well as removing restrictions about what teams a child may join based on where they live. 

  • Instead of Owing City, Golf Pro Getting $108K

    by Nicholas Deshais nickd@spokesman.com, (509) 459-5440 April 2015

    When state auditors and city officials found that Gary Lindeblad, the golf pro at Indian Canyon Golf Course since the mid-1980s, owed the city nearly $90,000 because of poor bookkeeping, he didn't balk.

  • Parks Backers Galled by Braves' Stadium Tax Diversion

    by Dan Klepal; Staff April 2015

    Cobb County will cover about half of the county's promised financing of the new Braves stadium by diverting millions of dollars in property taxes that voters approved in 2008 to buy park land.

  • Funding Freeze Puts Illinois Park Districts in a Bind

    by Laura Godlewski, Athletic Business Intern March 2015

    With the state of Illinois facing a $1.6 billion budget deficit, governor Bruce Rauner has placed an indefinite suspension on state grants for park district construction, which affects both current construction and new construction for park districts across the state. 

    This decision comes at a particularly poor time for many park districts just gearing up to start work on a variety of construction projects as warm spring weather sets in.

  • Poor Design Blamed for Rec Center's Financial Woes

    by Emily Attwood March 2015

    Seven Hills Recreation Center in Ohio lost $45,000 last year, bringing its total financial loss up to $553,000 since it opened in 2002 — not including the initial construction costs. According to Mayor Richard Dell'Aquila, poor initial design has caused the city-owned recreation center to become a "generational financial problem."

    “The recreation center has suffered from poor construction, bad design, and ineffective management," Dell'Aquila told Cleveland.com. "Combined with the worst financial recession since the 1930s, the recreation center has been largely responsible for much of the financial woes the city has suffered in the past decade.”

    Among the major expenses, the pool roof had to be replaced shortly after the center opened due to deterioration caused by pool chemicals. The $2 million cost was partially covered by the original subcontractor. The natatorium’s HVAC system was also replaced last year at a cost of $500,000. Dell’Aquilla says that the previous system never worked properly and led to structural issues throughout the rest of the recreation center.

    Read the full report

    In 2011, the city hired a consultant to inspect the recreation center and identify further construction deficiencies. In addition to poor facility ventilation, the inspection found that the no vapor barrier had been installed during initial construction, putting the facility at increased risk of deterioration due to moisture buildup. 

    Additionally, Dell’Aquilla criticized the original pool design, which is not large enough to host swim competitions. “There are many swim teams in our area that could have been attracted to the center with a little more thought.”

    RELATED: A Pool Survey Can Highlight Damage You Can't See

  • Cardio Equipment Leasing Strategies for Fitness Centers

    by Emily Attwood February 2015

    Cardio equipment is the heart of any fitness center. It's the most popular type of equipment, unintimidating and easy to use for fitness newbies, but also a powerful workout tool for enthusiasts. Befittingly, manufacturers are constantly seeking out new ways to improve their products, from design tweaks to make equipment more user-friendly to consoles featuring integrated technology to keep up with users' expectations. Today's cardio equipment is compatible with a range of wearable technology, offers a variety of virtual-reality programming, can record a long list of workout data, and can even alert operators to specific maintenance needs.

  • How to Keep Costly ‘Scope Creep’ at Bay When Building

    by Oliver Snider, Guest Contributor December 2014

    Reading The New York Times’ latest account of the costly and troubled World Trade Center Transportation Hub project, there came a point where I recognized that the scale of the disaster — $2 billion over budget and six years behind schedule — was all that separated that project from the typical campus project beset by scope creep.

  • More Bad News: UAB's Bowl Hopes Now 'Nonexistent'

    by Michael Gaio December 2014

    If it's true that "when it rains, it pours," consider UAB's football program drenched in a torrential monsoon.