RECENT ARTICLES
  • Jury: Vanderbilt Rape Defendants Guilty on All Charges

    by Michael Gaio January 2015

    Two former Vanderbilt football players who once had promising futures are now convicted rapists. A Nashville jury found Brandon Vandenburg, 21, of Indio, Calif. and Cory Batey, 21, of Nashville guilty of a total of 16 felony charges after raping an unconscious former student in a Vanderbilt dorm on June 23, 2013. Two other defendants, Brandon Banks and Jaborian "Tip" McKenzie, who are also former Vanderbilt football players, are also accused in the case. They are awaiting trial.

  • Swimmer Leaves Stanford Amid Assault Charges

    by Staff Report January 2015

    Several California publications are reporting that a Stanford University freshman swimmer from Oakwood High School has been charged with felony sexual assault involving what university police said was an on-campus attack.

  • YMCA Sued Over Injuries Caused by Water Play Feature

    by Steven Matthews January 2015

    The YMCA of Greater Dayton has been named as a defendant in a lawsuit after a female minor suffered injuries while visiting the Kroger Aquatic Center at The Heights in Huber Heights last summer.

  • Cubs Sued Over Wrigley Rooftop Revenue Sharing

    by Jared Hopkins, Tribune reporter January 2015

    Businesses owning and operating two Wrigley rooftops sued the Chicago Cubs and team chairman Tom Ricketts in federal court Tuesday, accusing the team of breaching the terms of its revenue-sharing contract, engaging in deceptive business practices and acting in violation of anti-trust laws.

  • WWE Wrestlers Cite Scripted Matches in Concussion Suit

    by Jeremy Roebuck; Inquirer Staff Writer January 2015

    Years of "chair shots," "flying head butts," "facebreakers," and "cobra clutch slams" have left former professional wrestlers with long-term brain injuries to which the sport's dominant circuit has continuously turned a blind eye, two ex-wrestlers allege in a proposed class-action suit filed in Philadelphia.

  • Former NCAA Chair Admits to Not Reading Freeh Report

    by Emily Attwood January 2015

    According to new court documents released this week, former NCAA executive committee chair and Oregon State president Ed Ray did not read the Freeh report before sanctioning Penn State’s football program. The report was the primary piece of evidence used by the NCAA to hand down sanctions. 

    RELATED: Did Emmert Deceive PSU Over Death Penalty Threat?

    The revelation comes from court documents filed as part of the Paterno lawsuit, Ray admitted to only reading the executive summary and press accounts. From the documents:

    Paterno family attorney Wick Sollers: You reviewed the Freeh Report at or about the time it came out, I take it.

    Ray: Actually, it was -- I think I did not go through the detailed report until after the agreement was reached. Remember, the report came out on the 12th. I went to Hawaii on, I don't know, the 14th. So, I may have looked at the executive summary when it came out, and certainly read press accounts, but I don't believe I read or was able to download and get a copy of the full report until after I got back, which would have been around the time of the press conference [announcing the Consent Decree], or sometime shortly thereafter.

    Sollers: Did not have the Freeh Report sent out to you in Hawaii?

    Ray: No. No.

    Sollers: Do you recall when you got back--

    Ray: So let me be clear about that. When I went to Hawaii, I didn't even know that we were going to be having any conversations about the Freeh Report. So I had no sense that I needed to prep for anything.
    We went on either the 14th or the 15th, at this point I can't remember. And then we had this conference call on the 17th. So no, I didn't have the Freeh Report. 
    And then I came back on, I think the 19th or 20th, traveling from there, probably on the 20th, and then the 21st we had this phone call [approving the Consent Decree]. So I didn't have a lot of time to prep for anything.
     

    "These are extraordinary circumstances," Ray said at a news conference announcing the sanctions. "The executive committee has the authority to act on behalf of the entire association in extraordinary circumstances. And we have chosen to exercise that authority.

    The NCAA has been under increasing criticism as of late for its handling of the Sandusky scandal, especially with new information coming to light as part of the lawsuit filed against the NCAA by the Paterno family. 

    Read the entire Paterno lawsuit filing here. 

    The scrutiny has also prompted a meeting of the Penn State board of trustees to discuss joining a lawsuit filed by state senators set for trial next month. The board is meeting today (January 16) to discuss and vote on a resolution to join the suit, which alleges that the NCAA had no authority to hand down its punishments.

     

     

  • Penn State Board of Trustees to Debate NCAA Lawsuit

    by Susan Snyder; Inquirer Staff Writer January 2015

    Pennsylvania State University's board of trustees will debate today whether to join a lawsuit against the NCAA, which sanctioned the university in the aftermath of the Jerry Sandusky child sex-abuse scandal, a board member said Thursday.

  • Youth Football Coach Convicted of Sexual Assaults

    by Mark Fazlollah; Inquirer Staff Writer January 2015

    After two hours of deliberations, a Common Pleas Court jury Thursday found a 25-year-old Philadelphia youth football coach guilty of sexually assaulting five boys ages 8 to 10 and a 21-year-old disabled man.

  • Lawsuit Alleges Conspiracy in Student's Gym Mat Death

    by Christian Boone; Staff January 2015

    Lawyers for the parents of the Valdosta teen whose body was found two years ago in a rolled-up gym mat have for the first time identified the two brothers they say killed their son.

  • Plaintiffs Gain Edge in Penn State Lawsuit

    by Rachel Axon, @RachelAxon, USA TODAY Sports January 2015

    Settlement talks between the NCAA and plaintiffs in a lawsuit challenging the validity of the association's consent decree with Penn State have been on hold for weeks but might get a kick-start after a federal court ruling Tuesday.