• First Amendment on Trial in UNC Athletic Events Ban

    by John T. Wolohan November 2014

    An increasing number of fans believe the simple act of purchasing a ticket gives them the right to say and do anything, and that free speech, protected by the United States Constitution, allows them to heckle and harass coaches and players as they see fit.

  • School, Coach Sued for Negligence in Runner Injury

    by John T. Wolohan October 2014

    One of the common defenses against a negligence lawsuit is sovereign or governmental immunity, which was developed in common law to provide government organizations and their employees with protection against legal liability in a lawsuit. While there are many benefits of sovereign or governmental immunity, the general theory behind the immunity is that it would be unfair to penalize all the citizens of the state for the benefit of a single person.

  • Concussion Lawsuit Examines School Nurse's Duty of Care

    by Kristi Schoepfer-Bochicchio and Mark Dodds September 2014

    The issue of sport concussions has been the subject of a number of recent high-profile cases — most notably, the NFL's $900 million settlement with former players. The National Hockey League, the NCAA, World Wrestling Entertainment and FIFA have also been dealing with high-profile lawsuits. The matter is not limited to professional and collegiate athletes, however. In the case of Strough v. Bedford Community School District et al, the Southern District of Iowa court awarded a high school football player $1 million in a negligence lawsuit against the local school district and the school's nurse. This award represents the largest payout for a high school athletics head injury case to date.

  • Lightning Victim's Family Suing Soccer Groups, Facility

    by Andrew Brandt September 2014

    The parents of a 9-year-old boy struck by lighting last month in Austin, Tex. have filed a lawsuit against three soccer associations and the facility.

    The boy, Alex Hermann, was struck on Aug. 26 at the Field of Dreams, part of a sports complex west of Austin. The lawsuit alleges that both the soccer associations and facility failed to meet basic standards for weather safety as well as warn of dangerous weather. Field of Dreams didn't have any lightning detection units in place, which would have been able to track lightning strikes within a predetermined radius of a facility.

    Local Austin news station KVUE reports that it wasn't raining at the time of the incident, and that the strike came appeared without warning.

    RELATED: Technology, Education Keys to Keeping Athletes Safe from Lightning

    The family looks to claim more than $10 million in medical and emotional damages, as Hermann, according to the family's lawyer, remains in "a semi-vegitative state."

    According to the family's attorney, Mark Levin, Hermann will require "around-the-clock care," and will potentially need his bedroom turned into a hospital room.

    RELATED: NATA Provides Guidelines on Lightning Safety

    Lightning strikes causing deaths hit an all-time low in the United States last year, with 23 fatalities. So far in 2014, there have been 23.


  • High School AD Pleads Guilty to Bid-Rigging

    by Andrew Brandt September 2014

    Fitzgerald Barnes, athletic director at Monticello High School in Charlottesville, Va., pleaded guilty to embezzling money from federal taxpayers on Friday in federal court.

  • Former HS Basketball Player Cut from Team, Sues School

    by Michael Gaio September 2014

    Getting cut from a high school athletic team can be a tough pill to swallow. For former Ohio basketball player Chase Johanson, the remedy has come in the form of a lawsuit.

  • Detroit Arena Forced to Improve Disability Access

    by Michael Gaio August 2014

    The Detroit Red Wings may soon have a new home, but in the meantime, some upgrades are in order for their current one.

  • Players: Kick Synthetic Turf Out of '15 Women's World Cup

    by Michael Gaio August 2014

    No senior men's or women's World Cup has ever been played on synthetic turf, and a group of top international women's players would like to keep in that way.

  • Did Biogenesis Founder Bosch Reach Teens with Steroids?

    by Andrew Brandt August 2014

    Today marks the one year anniversary of Major League Baseball's largest suspension sentencing, where more than a dozen players' seasons were halted due to their doping ties with Biogenesis.

  • Negligence, Athletic Trainers at Heart of Football Lawsuit

    by John T. Wolohan August 2014

    Colter Rios was playing in a junior varsity football game for Grossmont (Calif.) High School in 2008 when he felt a pop in his right ankle as he was tackled. Although he complained of pain when he tried to stand up, his coaches sent him back into the game without having the ankle examined. Colter was eventually removed from the game and sent to the athletic trainer to get his ankle taped.