RECENT ARTICLES
  • Beer-Photo Softball Coach Wants Due Process, Job Back

    by Mark Cooper, Staff Writer July 2014

    Jay Creps wants his job back. Creps was fired as Chatsworth's softball coach in early June after a parent turned in a photo of him drinking beer at a team gathering that occurred within the past couple of years. Creps, who coached Chatsworth the past five seasons, retained an attorney to fight for due process.

  • Whistleblower Lawsuit Details Alleged UNC Retaliation

    by Wes Platt July 2014

    CHAPEL HILL - Mary Willingham, a former University of North Carolina researcher, was demoted, isolated and subject to retaliation for telling the truth, she charges in a suit filed in Wake County court.

  • Locker Room Video Voyeur Pleads Guilty to Harassment

    by Telegraph Herald July 2014

    A Dubuque man accused of recording a woman changing in a gym locker room has pleaded guilty to a charge of second-degree harassment.

  • Death Sparks Lawsuit Over Codes, Staples Center Design

    by John T. Wolohan June 2014

    As is often the case in law, how the courts interpret a statute is often the determining factor in the case. For example, California Building Standards Code (CBSC) states that the top of guardrails shall not be less than 42 inches in height, except in front of the first row of fixed balcony seats. In that case, the top of the guardrail may be 26 inches in height.

  • NFL Alum Turner Paid High Price for $5M NFL Settlement

    by Ron Borges June 2014

    Kevin Turner, like anyone receiving a $5 million windfall, would have been happy to talk about it yesterday. Only one problem: He can't talk well enough anymore to be understood over the phone. Such are the ravages of ALS, commonly known as Lou Gehrig's Disease and more commonly known as a death sentence. In Turner's case, it's all tied together. His days in the NFL as a crushing lead blocker led to so many concussions he can't recall them all. It also led the fullback to be among the most admired players in the league when the topic was stone toughness. Yet there was a price to pay, as there is for all things. In Turner's case the brain trauma he suffered plying his trade led to being diagnosed with ALS four years ago, and yesterday that won him a hard-earned $5 million settlement he can no longer speak about. So for several hours he exchanged texts from a hotel room in Washington with an old friend about the announcement that the concussion lawsuit between more than 4,500 retired players and the NFL had been settled again. This time, the league agreeing to an uncapped monetary figure for damages without admitting guilt to anything, while the plaintiffs agreed to allow unlimited appeals of individual cases.

  • Duration of KU Tickets-for-Bond Deal Questioned

    by Mike Vernon and Jesse Newell, The Capital-Journal June 2014

    This isn't what Andrew Knopp intended to sign the Kansas student body up for. Knopp - KU's student body president from 2003-04 - questions the ethics of KU Athletics in regards to a contract signed in 2004. The contract terms, he says, were never supposed to stretch nearly a quarter-century. In April 2004, Knopp signed a contract with former athletic director Lew Perkins. The main point of the contract was this, according to Knopp: KU Athletics would pay up to $1 million per year for the new recreation center expansion and in exchange would get to sell 1,431 seats in Allen Fieldhouse that previously were student tickets. The swap, according to Knopp, would basically be $1 million for $1 million each year, with Perkins assuring Knopp that KU Athletics could make at least $1 million extra by selling those 1,431 seats as season tickets instead of single-game tickets when those seats went unused by students.

  • Sandusky Probe Report Less Critical than AG Kane

    by Angela Couloumbis and Craig R. McCoy; Inquirer Staff Writers June 2014

    Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane's review of the investigation into pedophile Jerry Sandusky was supposed to finally explain why the case took nearly three years to build, and whether it was bogged down by politics.

  • As O'Bannon Trial Drags On, It's Easier to Foresee Payday

    by Tim Dahlberg June 2014

    They come calling with promises of a good education, a chance to play on television and some of the best facilities that money can buy. There may come a time, though, when recruiters chasing the best high school football and basketball players offer something else: a nice paycheck to take with them as a parting gift when their college days are over. Football players could get several hundred thousand dollars.

  • YMCA Embroiled In Lyme Disease Summer Camp Lawsuit

    by Kristi Schoepfer-Bochicchio June 2014

    In October, the parents of 17-year-old Ariana Sierzputowski filed a $41.7 million negligence lawsuit against YMCA Camp Mohawk, an overnight camp for 7- to 15-year-old girls located in Litchfield, Conn. The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in Connecticut, alleges that Sierzputowski contracted Lyme disease while at the camp in 2011, when she was 14 years old.

  • Ohio Case Paved Way for O'Bannon's NCAA Lawsuit

    by Todd Jones, THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH June 2014

    Seeds for Ed O'Bannon's antitrust lawsuit against the NCAA that is playing out in a California federal courtroom were planted five years ago in Ohio. They involved a former college baseball player from Vermilion, his attorney in Cleveland, and their favorable ruling from a judge in Erie County. O'Bannon's class-action suit is drawing national attention in its second week at trial because of possible ramifications that could alter the traditional system of college sports.