RECENT ARTICLES
  • Iowa's Free-Tuition Student Ticket Promo Goes Awry

    by Michael Gaio August 2014

    Attracting students to college football games is a challenge for schools across the country. As AB reported last year, even the Alabamas of the world are having a tough time drawing students away from the tailgating scene and into the stadium. Last week, the University of Iowa launched a promotion to solve this problem.

  • NCAA, Athletes Reach Head Injury Lawsuit Settlement

    by Andrew Brandt July 2014

    The NCAA and current and former college athletes have reached a preliminary settlement in a class action lawsuit involving the NCAA's head-injury policy.

  • LA Fitness Sued for Negligence in Basketball Game Attack

    by Kristi Schoepfer-Bochicchio, J.D. July 2014

    Cornelius Lister was a member of the LA Fitness facility in Andorra, Pa., when a physical altercation broke out during a basketball game in September 2012. Lister sustained a variety of injuries when four men attacked him during the game. One of the assailants was a member of the club, but the second identified by police was not a member. Police did not identify the other two assailants. The LA Fitness employee working at the front desk allowed non-members to enter the club and play despite access to the basketball court being limited to club members only.

  • Yankees Fan Caught Sleeping Suing MLB, ESPN

    by Emily Attwood July 2014

    No, he’s not suing because the Yankees failed to deliver a fan experience worthy of watching. The fan, Andrew Rector, has filed a lawsuit alleging defamation after video of him sleeping was broadcast on ESPN, along with some colorful commentary from announcers  John Kruk and Dan Shulman, who are named in the suit along with the MLB, the Yankees and ESPN. 

  • Death Sparks Lawsuit Over Codes, Staples Center Design

    by John T. Wolohan June 2014

    As is often the case in law, how the courts interpret a statute is often the determining factor in the case. For example, California Building Standards Code (CBSC) states that the top of guardrails shall not be less than 42 inches in height, except in front of the first row of fixed balcony seats. In that case, the top of the guardrail may be 26 inches in height.

  • YMCA Embroiled In Lyme Disease Summer Camp Lawsuit

    by Kristi Schoepfer-Bochicchio June 2014

    In October, the parents of 17-year-old Ariana Sierzputowski filed a $41.7 million negligence lawsuit against YMCA Camp Mohawk, an overnight camp for 7- to 15-year-old girls located in Litchfield, Conn. The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in Connecticut, alleges that Sierzputowski contracted Lyme disease while at the camp in 2011, when she was 14 years old.

  • Washington Redskins Lose Federal Trademarks

    by Michael Gaio June 2014

    In what's being called a "landmark decision," the United States Patent and Trademark Office has canceled six federal trademark registrations for the name of the Washington Redskins, ruling that the name is "disparaging to Native Americans." Due to its "disparaging" nature, the name cannot be trademarked under federal law which prohibits protection of offensive or disparaging language.

  • NCAA Settles EA Video Game Lawsuit

    by Michael Gaio June 2014

    The NCAA announced Monday morning it had agreed to settle the lawsuit brought against it over the popular college-themed Electronic Arts video games.

  • Athletes' Unionization Attempt Scores Major Victory

    by Michael Gaio March 2014

    In their attempt to unionize college athletes, the Northwestern football players and the recently formed College Athletes Players Association scored a major victory on Wednesday.

  • Former WVU Football Player the Latest to Sue NCAA

    by Michael Gaio March 2014

    Former West Virginia football player Shawne Alston is the latest former student-athlete to sue the NCAA. Alston filed suit against the NCAA and college football's five major conferences on Wednesday, claiming they violated antitrust laws by agreeing to cap the value of an athletic scholarship at less than the actual cost of attending school.