Unfortunately, for the second day in a row, we are writing about the death of a youth football player. However, this one wasn't caused by a helmet-to-helmet hit or any other football-related injury.

Thirteen-year-old Cameron Espinosa died Sunday, four days after suffering a severe allergic reaction to ant bites during a football game. According to NBC News, Espinosa was in a huddle with his teammates at Paul R. Haas Middle School in Corpus Christi, Texas, last Wednesday when he started yelling, "Ants! Ants! Ants!"

Shortly after, Espinosa collapsed and was taken to the hospital.

Espinosa's mother, Josephine Limon, told a local TV station that having more trained personnel on hand, or even something as simple as an EpiPen, could have saved her son's life.

Limon has hired a lawyer to look into her son's death.

Corpus Christi Independent School District board member Hector Salinas says he's personally seen more than 20 ant piles on the field where Espinosa was attacked.

"Parents, they rely on us and the school to take care of the kids and make sure they're safe," Salinas said. "And somehow, you know what? We didn't do our job."

Fire ants have caused problems at sporting events in the past. If your fields are dealing with an ant problem, this article outlines five ways to get rid of them.

Michael Gaio is eMedia Editor of Athletic Business.
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Was the parents aware he was allergic to ants? Was it written on his medical forms that are to be kept on file at the school? Does the kid have an epi pen that was prescribed to him by the doctor? If not how can the parent think the school carry epi pens? You cannot administer epi pens just to anyone. If the parent had an epi pen prescribed for the child did they give it to school personnel? There are a lot of unanswered questions provided by the media but they are sure to point fingers right away at the school.
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A very sad situation, but a school board member should not be running his mouth about the school being at fault. Let the legal system determine that. Since Mr. Salinas says he has personally seen the ant piles on the field before, and he is a person in a position of authority who chose to do nothing about it, I'd say he has just put himself in a position to be personally sued.
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I agree Randy. Mr. Salinas is also an ex college coach as well as High school coach. Do you think he paid attention all the time to ants? I bet not plus nobody thinks this can happen to them and when it does then all fingers start pointing to others for blame.
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A previous comment was correct that an epi-pen can not be even kept unless there is a signed letter from the athlete stating that specifically. However, I am assuming there is was no athletic trainer on site or even a full-time employee of the school. If that was true, a certified athletic trainer would have been the healthcare professional to administer the medication and save the young man's life. Another good example of why there should be a certified athletic trainer in any school that has interscholastic athletic competitions. All parents of these athletes need to fight for this to happen!
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Mr. Salinas sealed his fate by saying something that he may not really be qualified to say or even really know about. Bend over and prepare for the parent trap!
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I agree Randy. Mr. Salinas is also an ex college coach as well as High school coach. Do you think he paid attention all the time to ants? I bet not plus nobody thinks this can happen to them and when it does then all fingers start pointing to others for blame.
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Epi-pens are prescription medications designated for a specific individual. So the school can't and won't have an epi-pen on hand whenever a student gets stung by an ant, bee or whatever.

That being so, it is the job of the parents to alert the school as to any allergies that their child might have. Students with severe allergies must have medicine at their disposal, not locked up in the nurse's office or the coach's office but right near the student. Same is true with diabetics. Diabetics must have access to candy or sodas if needed.

A trainer knowledgeable of the allergies of all of the student-athletes under his/her care should have the epi-pens and candy in their custody whenever on duty around those students.
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Tennessee passed a law in the spring of 2013 requiring all schools to have an Epi-pen. I can be used by qualified school personnel under the law.. Many other states have recently passed similar laws. The Tennessee law goes further and requires each school public & private to have an Epi-Pen available for this type of emergency. More athletic trainers are carrying Epi-pens in case of problems after the school day.

Can a school really afford to be without Epi-pens readily available?