RECENT ARTICLES
  • Shaping the Future of Athletics Safety and Security

    by Dennis Van Milligen July 2014

    Editor's note: Look for more Sports Venue Safety articles as we publish a new one online each day this week. Or, view the entire digital issue here.

    My first exposures to the issues of safety and security at a sporting event came when I was eight years old. It was at Old Comiskey, back when the Chicago White Sox were "winning ugly" in the American League West. I remember going to at least half a dozen games that year with my father as the White Sox fought for an AL West championship, but that wasn't the only fighting I witnessed. The fights in the stands became as much of a spectacle as the game itself. It got to a point that we never wondered if a fight would break it, but rather when. Though I attended games with my father, a U.S. Navy SEAL and Golden Gloves boxing champion, I never had a complete sense of safety. Still, I was undeterred. I loved going to Old Comiskey and watching the White Sox despite the extracurricular activities.

  • Tuesday Takedown: Talking Sports Safety at NCS4

    by Dennis Van Milligen July 2014

    I had the pleasure to travel down beautifully boring I-65 to Indianapolis last week for the National Center for Spectator Sports Safety and Security's annual conference, where the superheroes of the sports security world gathered to address the constantly evolving challenge of protecting its venues, athletes and spectators from new and old threats alike. Outside of the Athletic Business Conference & Expo, there is no other conference I look forward to attending more, and this year's show did not disappoint. 

  • Angry Minority Destroying Social Media

    by Dennis Van Milligen July 2014

    Popular AB contributor Chris Yandle, assistant AD for communications at the University of Miami, wrote a great post for our website in May about our collective love/hate relationship with social media.

  • Tuesday Takedown: Collegiate Safety Best Practices

    by Dennis Van Milligen July 2014

    NCS4 kicked off its annual conference and expo Monday with the formal introduction of its Intercollegiate Athletics Safety and Security Best Practices Guide. The 100-plus page "living" document is the result of collegiate security and safety leaders brainstorming ideas at NCS4's first National Intercollegiate Athletics Safety and Security Summit last January at the University of Southern Mississippi, according to symposium moderator Paul Denton, chief of police at Ohio State University.

  • Tuesday Takedown: Security Fails Marring Best World Cup

    by Dennis Van Milligen June 2014

    Security at this year's FIFA World Cup has been intensely scrutinized, starting months in advance as host country Brazil raced to get its stadiums ready for the 32-team tournament, a topic addressed by AB's Michael Gaio last month. Next came the safety of athletes, coaches and spectators.

  • Tuesday Takedown: Little Sense in Volunteer-Coach Ban

    by Dennis Van Milligen June 2014

    Being Father's Day last Sunday, I felt compelled to weigh in on a story that came across our newswire last week where a country board in South Carolina is considering banning volunteer parents from coaching to avoid the perceived "favoritism" that is apparently associated with parents coaching their children. Yes, you read correctly. At a time when we are dealing with a coaching crisis of sorts across the country and should be encouraging parents to be more involved in their child's life, there is a group out there that wants to ban those parents from not only helping their kids, but other kids on that sports team, as well.  

    First, I played baseball for my father for many years and let me assure you, there was zero favoritism. My father was harder on me than any other player and demanded more from me than any player. More often than not, you'll find this is the norm for parents coaching their children. Of course, every parent is different. Mine was the Bobby Knight of Little League. He was a great but sometimes volatile coach that definitely made his share of enemies at the park district. One notable memory was when he had me pitch and hit leadoff when I was 11… and had a broken arm. He was swiftly banned from playing me until the cast came off and I was cleared by a doctor to return to action. My father took great pride in winning, and worked hard with all of his players to make them better. And they loved him for it. 

    So what about on the high school level where many parents volunteer their time assisting the head coach? Let's make sure we are identifying a key word in that sentence: volunteer. These parents are not paid; they are taking time out of their likely busy schedules to help the team at no cost. So how much power exactly do these volunteer parents have? Last I checked, it is your paid head coach that is making those decisions. If these coaches are filling head coaching voids, shouldn't the school and/or district be happy they have somebody that's at least willing to step up to the plate when apparently no one else would?

    But say we remove those parents and replace them with other volunteer coaches that do not have kids playing on those teams; ones that will show no favoritism. How well do you actually know these coaches? They used to play baseball in high school, that's great. But what else? How are they going to teach the boys and girls the life lessons that come with playing sports? Volunteer coaches not only demonstrate expertise but serve as role models, as well. A news report from earlier this year on South Florida volunteer youth coaches, for example, uncovered that many of these volunteer coaches were convicted felons.

    If there is "favoritism" happening with volunteer parents, the solution is far simpler and much less extreme than simply banning all volunteer parents. How about actually talking with the parties involved about the complaints rather than making a rash decision based on what is likely a very vocal minority. Banning volunteer coaches? This makes as much sense as playing a child with a broken arm in a meaningless baseball game.

     

  • AB's Architectural Showcase a Yearlong Affair

    by Emily Attwood June 2014

    The Architectural Showcase in June is the one issue of Athletic Business I look forward to most each year. It's also the issue I spend most of each year working on.

  • Blog: Architects vs. Mother Nature

    by Andrew Barnard June 2014

    Man owns the straight line. Mother Nature owns everything else. 

  • Tuesday Takedown: Witnessing a Health Club's Rebirth

    by Dennis Van Milligen June 2014

    It is safe to say that necessity is the mother of reinvention these days in the health club industry. The rise of in-home fitness options and low-priced health clubs are certainly factors in fitness chains reinventing themselves and how they attract/retain members, but for the Midtown Athletic Club, neither played a role in its $1 million renovation this year. Rather, it was an industry trend driving its new approach and layout.

  • Absence of Accountability in Recent High School Attacks

    by Dennis Van Milligen June 2014

    Toward the beginning of 2013, Lockport (N.Y.) High School athletic director Patrick Burke was the recipient of the 2013 Empire State Supervisors and Administrators Association's Administrator of the Year Award. He has been praised by his peers for his work ethic and leadership, and for being a role model at the school he loves and within the community he serves. Toward the end of 2013, Burke found himself the recipient of something entirely different: a beating by two intoxicated students he attempted to confront for unruly behavior at a basketball scrimmage.