• How to Protect Against Rioting at Your College

    by April 2015

    Joe Monroe, chief of police at the University of Kentucky, has gotten used to protecting the streets of Lexington from rioting fans. He's had to do so frequently over the past few years as the school's men's basketball team, led by head coach John Calipari, has made four Final Four appearances the past five years. Last Saturday night, after the previously undefeated Wildcats were eliminated from the NCAA tournament by Wisconsin, fans took to the streets of Lexington (yet again). Monroe and his campus police team (yet again) had to protect the community and keep the peace in collaboration with city police. Monroe, who teaches special-event planning for NCS4 and Texas A&M, shares his experiences while providing advice to other campus safety professionals in this Gameday Security exclusive interview:

  • Blog: Madison Prepares for the Best, and Worst, Tonight

    by April 2015

    There was never any doubt that chaos would reign supreme across the streets of Lexington, but those that bleed Kentucky blue (and many that don't) expected that chaos to come tonight after Kentucky completed its perfect season with a victory over Duke. Instead, that time frame was accelerated to Saturday night when John Calipari's McDonald's All-Americans fell to Bo Ryan's Wisconsin team 71-64 in the NCAA men's basketball national semifinal.

  • Blog: Destroying the Student-Athlete — A Cautionary Tale

    by March 2015

    For far too many college athletic programs, acting in the best interests of the student-athlete is pure fiction. From academic fraud to sexual assaults, colleges and universities have frequently failed their student-athletes by putting their best interests ahead of the student-athlete's. These failures extend beyond what is making national headlines, and can happen at the most unlikely of institutions — in my case, a Catholic university.

  • Blog: The Buzz from IHRSA 2015

    by Stuart Goldman March 2015

    There was a lot of buzz in the room during Bill McBride’s session last Wednesday at the IHRSA show in Los Angeles.

    True, attendees were interested in what McBride had to say about “Progressive Opportunities in the Health and Fitness Industry.” But what literally created the buzz was the noise from the headsets worn by international attendees. A row of glassed-in interpreters sat in the back of the room to deliver McBride’s session in Japanese, Chinese, Spanish and Russian.

  • Blog: NCAA Tourney Memories Still Sting 20 Years Later

    by Stuart Goldman March 2015

    You’ve seen the shot thousands of times. As March Madness begins in earnest this week, you’ll see it a few more.

    UCLA’s Tyus Edney dribbles the length of the court and hits the layup that beats Missouri in the 1995 NCAA Tournament. 

    Few moments in sports are better than the buzzer-beater. Shot goes up. Buzzer sounds. Shot goes in. Crowd erupts.

    Jubilation if you’re on the winning team. Deflation if you’re on the losing end.

  • Blog: Misfiring on Active-Shooter Preparation

    by February 2015

    Two years ago, while picking up my oldest daughter from school, I was overwhelmed with anxiety, fear and one all-consuming thought: Get her home.

  • Blog: Off and Running at iClubs and Athletic Business

    by Stuart Goldman February 2015

    A little over a month ago, I officially accepted my new job as the editor of iClubs and a contributor to Athletic Business. So far, it’s been busy, and that’s a good thing.

  • Dean Smith Personified Humility, Courage, College Basketball

    by Stuart Goldman February 2015

    The Paul Terry Classic was an annual high school basketball tournament in Emporia, Kan.

    The tournament, which lasted 14 years until 2010, was named after the first African-American to play basketball at Emporia High School. The coach at Emporia High who put Terry in the starting lineup was a man by the name of Alfred Smith. That was 1932.

    Smith’s son, Dean Smith, was 1 year old.

  • Back To School for My Collegiate Security Education

    by February 2015

    Death Valley is the intimidating home field of LSU football where, on any given Saturday in the fall, the number of tailgating, non-ticket-holding fans can equal the 100,000+ entering the gates to watch their beloved Tigers. It's a security nightmare that requires meticulous planning, flawless execution, and a little help from your friends in the industry.

  • Blog: The NFL Knows No Offseason

    by Stuart Goldman February 2015

    The debate over whether the Seattle Seahawks should have given the ball to Marshawn Lynch at the 1-yard line in the closing seconds of Super Bowl XLIX will rage all season long in the Pacific Northwest and the rest of the country.