Emily Attwood
Emily (emily@athleticbusiness.com) joined the Athletic Business team in 2011, a natural transition from her previous work at PFP (Personal Fitness Professional), a B2B fitness industry brand, and Inside Wisconsin Sports, a consumer sports publication. AB’s managing editor by day, Emily spends her nights typing away at what she hopes will someday turn into a novel that other people will find worth reading. A graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Emily continues to enjoy living in the city with her husband, Derek, and biking to work, except during winter, when she doesn't enjoy much of anything.
  • Thursday, May, 21, 2015
    Athletes Must Pass Phys. Ed. Under School’s New Standards

    The Wareham, Mass., School District approved a proposal earlier this week to change the high school policy addendum to include stricter academic standards for athletes. Student-athletes must now pass at least seven major subjects per quarter to remain eligible for varsity sports.


  • Thursday, May, 14, 2015
    New Projects: Wehrle Innovation Center | Maryland Heights Community Center

    Breaking Ground

    The University of Charleston breaks ground this month on its Russell and Martha Wehrle Innovation Center (above), named to reflect a $5 million contribution from the namesakes' memorial foundation. Designed by Associated Architects of Charleston, W.V., the $15.5 million project is the final piece of a $100 million campus renovation project undertaken over the past decade. Phase one will replace the existing Eddie King Gym with a new arena featuring stadium-style seating, new concessions and a walking track. Phase two will renovate the aquatic and auxiliary gymnasium areas, add racquetball courts and a climbing wall, and link the new addition to the existing fitness center. The center will also house programming space for developing innovative projects and promoting entrepreneurship.


  • Tuesday, May, 12, 2015
    Mermaid Tails Newest Safety Concern at Canadian Pools

    The growing popularity of mermaid tail aquatic accessories has officials in Alberta, Canada, concerned for swimmers’ safety. The tail, popular among young girls in particular, typically consist of brightly colored fabric that covers a swimmer’s legs and ends in a wide fin. 


  • Wednesday, May, 06, 2015
    Two Boys Hospitalized After Tree Collapse at Park

    Two young boys in Chelsea, Mass., were hospitalized Monday night after a tree collapsed onto the playground where they had been playing.


  • Wednesday, May, 06, 2015
    Air Force Trainee Dies After Collapse

    A 19-year-old Air Force trainee at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland collapsed during a physical fitness training exercise on Monday. Following attempts by medical personnel to revive her, the woman, identified as Kelani Thomas of Troy, Ala., was taken to the San Antonio Medical Center and pronounced dead.


  • Wednesday, May, 06, 2015
    Moving Toward a Self-Sustainable Aquatics Funding Model

    Of all the municipal recreation programs that suffered budget cuts during the Great Recession, perhaps no area has taken a bigger hit than aquatics. Public pools have never been a profitable line item in recreation budgets, bogged down by expensive initial construction costs and ongoing maintenance needs. Public pools drained their waters left and right to save on operational costs, and even with budgets rebounding, deferred maintenance has caused expenses to increase to the point where many programs have no choice but to close down indefinitely.


  • Tuesday, May, 05, 2015
    Kids' Triathlon Pool Fails Inspection, Used Anyway

    Thousands of children participated in a triathlon this past weekend in Jacksonville, Fla., despite reports that the pool used had failed a health inspection earlier in the week. But that’s okay, event and city officials say.

    As part of the two-day conversion of EverBank Field to host swimming, biking and running for the 7th Annual First Coast Kids Triathlon, a portable pool was constructed on the site. The event was a success, despite reports that swimmers had to be pulled from the pool by lifeguards due to the absence of pool ladders. 

    Because the pool was temporary, city officials say it was not considered a public pool under the state’s Department of Health, and thus was not subject to the same inspection criteria. In particular, the water used for such pools is pumped in and out and not recalculated. 

    “They actually don't have guidelines to monitor portable pools, so we actually work with them to set up a structure that allows us to circulate the water and make sure that it's safe,” event director Tom Gildersleeve told ActionNewsJax.com

    Furthermore, while the status of portable pools for city inspection purposes is still a little murky, the event still had to fulfill the guidelines set forth by USA Triathlon. 

    “Our events are all sanctioned by USA Triathlon, which is the governing board underneath the U.S. Olympic Committee so there's a safety protocol we follow,” Gildersleeve said.

    Such pools have been used at other kids triathlon events. Lifeguards were also on hand both in and out of the pool to monitor participants’ safety. 

     


  • Monday, April, 27, 2015
    Protest Puts Camden Yards on Temporary Lockdown

    In an unusual turn of events, it wasn’t the behavior of fans inside the venue that caused problems at a Baltimore Orioles game on Saturday but the commotion outside of Camden Yards. A protest over the death of Freddie Gray turned destructive, with protesters breaking windows and throwing items at the police and vowing to "shut down" the city. 


  • Friday, April, 24, 2015
    Report Questions Whether UAB Football Was Unprofitable

    The University of Alabama-Birmingham drew national attention — and a great deal of anger locally — last fall when it announced it was dropping its football program due to cost concerns. A new report released this week, however, questions that decision, asserting that the sport did make money for the university and would continue to increase in value. 


  • Wednesday, April, 22, 2015
    Bill Banning 'Redskins' Moniker Advances in California

    The state of California is poised to quell any further debate over whether “Redskins” is an inappropriate athletic team name once and for all. The California Racial Mascots Act, advanced to a state Assembly panel on Tuesday, would prohibit the use of the name by any public school beginning January 1, 2016. 

    “There is obviously a lack of respect when we allow teams to brand themselves with racial slurs,” said assemblyman Luis Alejo, the bill’s author. “The R-word was once used to describe Native American scalps sold for bounty, and in today's society it has become widely recognized as a racial slur.”

    There are currently four public schools in the state that use the name Redskins for their athletic programs. The affected schools would not be required to cease all use of the name. Items such as yearbooks and newspapers would not longer be able to utilize the name, but to prevent financial hardship, schools would be allowed to keep uniforms and other materials bearing the name, provided they have selected a new name. Under the legislation, schools would be able to purchase up to 20 percent of uniforms with the old name until 2019.

    RELATED: Washington Redskins Lose Federal Trademarks

    “Tulare Union Redskins are part of a long and proud tradition dating back to 1890,” Sarah Koligian, superintendent of Tulare Join Union High School District, one of the four holdout schools, told  SFGate. “Our school has worked closely with our local Indian tribes to include them in the discussion regarding how the Tulare Union Redskin depicts both pride and respect.”

    The bill, approved last month by the Assembly Education Committee, was approved by the Assembly Committee on Arts, Entertainment, Sports, Tourism and Internet Media but must go through another committee before advancing to the Assembly floor.

    “It’s a small thing we can do in California that is part of a national movement to phase out the use of racial slurs as mascots,” Alejo said.

    RELATED: High School's 'Arab' Mascot Called Into Question


  • Monday, June, 16, 2014
    AB's Architectural Showcase a Yearlong Affair

    The Architectural Showcase in June is the one issue of Athletic Business I look forward to most each year. It's also the issue I spend most of each year working on.


  • Friday, April, 04, 2014
    Blog: Wine at the Gym? I’ll Drink to That

    Cardio equipment? Check. Towel service? Check. Group exercise schedule? Check. Liquor license? Pending.


  • Thursday, February, 27, 2014
    Blog: Let Them Eat Cake, If They So Choose

    On Tuesday, the White House announced a series of new initiatives as part of the fourth anniversary of the “Let’s Move!” program. Many of them are a great step forward in the battle against childhood obesity and inactivity, including an expansion of the school breakfast program and a five-year partnership with the National Recreation and Park Association and Boys & Girls Clubs of America will provide 5 million children with healthy snacks and physical activity opportunities after school. 


  • Monday, January, 13, 2014
    Blog: Women-Only Fitness Zones Perpetuate Stereotypes

    Here at AB, it’s the editors’ job to stay on top of what’s happening in the industries we serve. As such, last Friday I came across an article about a gym in Vancouver getting some flak for its decision to close its women-only section. 


  • Thursday, October, 10, 2013
    Blog: If You Can't Beat 'Em… Beat 'Em Up!

    I was sitting in a hotel lobby surrounded by other people when I opened up my morning news alerts and saw an article announcing the Kentucky High School Athletic Associations' decision to suspend post-game handshakes, so I had to keep my disgust to a minimum - a casual eye roll and understated sigh. Seriously? These athletes are displaying poor sportsmanship, and the solution to that is to do away with the concept? That's like dropping math from the curriculum because the students aren't getting it.


  • Friday, September, 20, 2013
    Blog: Defending "The Slowest Generation"

    Friday afternoon, when I should have been hard at work on AB's November issue, I instead found myself fuming over an article from Thursday's Wall Street Journal sent to me by our company owner. The article deemed younger athletes "The Slowest Generation," and accused my generation of being too apathetic about performance and competition.