Paul Steinbach
Paul Steinbach (paul@athleticbusiness.com) joined the Athletic Business staff in November 1999, and now holds the title of senior editor. His work covering college athletics and sports facility operation has garnered several regional and national journalism honors, including a Jesse H. Neal National Business Journalism Award. He is a 1989 graduate of the University of Wisconsin and currently resides with his children Jack and Libby in his hometown of West Bend, Wis. In his spare time, he enjoys mowing patterns into his backyard ballpark — the naming rights to which are still available.
  • Tuesday, April, 26, 2011
    Are Colleges Gaming Title IX Compliance?

    Today's New York Times reports that college athletic departments often use deception to comply with Title IX. "Many are padding women's team rosters with underqualified, even unwitting, athletes. They are counting male practice players as women. And they are trimming the rosters of men's teams," wrote Katie Thomas, with reporting help from three additional Times staffers.


  • Tuesday, April, 19, 2011
    College Coaching Transitions Challenge Athletics Staff

    Under the March 21 headline "UT Relieves Bruce Pearl of Duties," the University of Tennessee athletics web site offered a 79-word announcement regarding the departure of the Volunteers' men's basketball coach.


  • Monday, April, 11, 2011
    Social Environments Help Health Clubs with Member Retention

    At the dawn of the modern health club era - the mid-1970s - Rick Caro became fascinated by a foursome of elderly women who gathered for a regular tennis match at one of the clubs Caro owned.


  • Thursday, March, 31, 2011
    AP: Testing for PEDs Inconsistent at College Level

    The Associated Press has reviewed the policies for performance-enhancing drug testing at 51 American colleges and universities, as well as those of the NCAA and individual conferences, and found little consistency tying them together. School policies vary widely, and while some conferences augment the NCAA's umbrella drug-testing program, others offer nothing in addition to the association's efforts to test athletes on campus and at its own sanctioned events.


  • Wednesday, March, 23, 2011
    Overly Aggressive Workouts Put Athletes at Risk of Rhabdomyolysis

    A University of Iowa investigation into the January hospitalization of 13 football players has determined that an intense exercise regimen on the heels of a three-week layoff from supervised workouts was the cause of the players' rhabdomyolysis, a potentially fatal breakdown of muscle fibers into the bloodstream, where excess proteins can clog the kidneys and cause renal failure.


  • Friday, March, 04, 2011
    Akron Aeros Introduce Meaty Concessions Lineup

    Earlier this week, the minor-league Akron Aeros unveiled two new concessions items: the half-pound "Wonderdog" and its even heftier cousin "The Eighth Wonder of the World," which weighs in at a full pound. Akron's first-year director of food and beverage Jason Kerton arranged for a sausage company in Cleveland to custom-make the foot-long-and-then-some franks.


  • Wednesday, February, 23, 2011
    Synthetic Turf Fields Benefitting from Latest Fiber Technology

    The Tampa Bay Rays have played on synthetic turf since their inaugural season in 1998, but the surface installed at Tropicana Field this past offseason is different.


  • Friday, February, 18, 2011
    Alabama-Auburn Rivalry Takes Potentially Fatal Turn

    The rivalry between the University of Alabama and Auburn has spread off the field to beneath two trees, with the confirmation this week that an Alabama fan poured lethal doses of herbicide on the revered oaks at Toomer's Corner near the Auburn campus. For generations, the 130-year-old trees have served as a post-game gathering place for fans after Auburn victories. Revelers cover the trees in toilet paper - a tradition known as "rolling."


  • Friday, January, 28, 2011
    Another KU Ticket Official Pleads Guilty to Conspiracy

    Former University of Kansas director of ticket operations Charlette Blubaugh on Thursday became the latest official ensnared in a ticketing scam to plead guilty to conspiracy charges.


  • Wednesday, January, 26, 2011
    Sweat Can Damage Stationary Bikes, Tarnish a Facility's Image

    "Okay, class, who's ready to sweat?" Such a question might be greeted with enthusiasm - even cheers - from a room full of eager stationary cyclists. After all, that's why they're here. And in this setting, inspiration translates to perspiration. If it doesn't, something's wrong.


  • Wednesday, November, 30, 2016
    AB Show 2016: The Magic of Orlando

    There’s something about Orlando, Fla., that stirs the nostalgia in this AB Show-goer. It’s where the conference and expo (as it used to be known) was held my first eight years at Athletic Business, and it has been there another four times since. In all, Orlando has served as the annual home away from home for AB roughly half the time in our show’s 35-year history.


  • Monday, November, 10, 2014
    Get to Know Your Peers When Attending ABC

    This is a story about a conversation Lou Holtz and I never had.


  • Tuesday, August, 12, 2014
    Robin Williams Drew Attention to Inaugural Augie’s BASH

    Robin Williams possessed the kind of frenetic magnetism that dared you to look away. For me, it wasn’t possible. The actor/comedian’s larger-than-life persona was tailor-made for a movie screen.


  • Thursday, January, 17, 2013
    Blog: The Tangled Webs of Lance Armstrong, Manti Te'o

    The twisted tales of Lance Armstrong and Manti Te'o are now intertwined. Heroes to many, these athletes have lived lies before our eyes, and now those lies are unraveling within the same week.


  • Monday, December, 03, 2012
    Blog: The Life and Death of Rick Majerus

    The first time I saw Rick Majerus in person, he was sitting in seldom-used end-court bleachers that had been wheeled into position for a Wisconsin Interscholastic Athletic Association Class C basketball sectional at my high school alma mater's field house. I was there to cover a game for my hometown newspaper, The West Bend News. Majerus, an assistant coach at Marquette at the time (this was the mid-'80s), was there to scout Kohler, Wis., phenom Joe Wolf, who would eventually attend North Carolina.


  • Friday, August, 17, 2012
    Blog: Cheer These Pro Athletes for Giving Back

    Assuming your membership in the Latrell "I have a family to feed" Sprewell Fan Club has expired, may we suggest a couple of options.


  • Sunday, January, 17, 2010
    Blog: Still Believing, 34 Years (and Counting) Later

    Editor's Note: AB Senior Editor Paul Steinbach authored this piece in January 2010, but with February 22nd marking the 34th anniversary of the Miracle on Ice and the U.S. men's hockey team facing off against Canada on Friday, the message still rings true.

    For nearly 30 years now, the 1980 U.S. Olympic hockey team has been an off-and-on obsession of mine.


  • Thursday, December, 10, 2009
    A Choice to Make

    There's precedent for a Catholic institution sticking with a coach despite his pro-choice stance on abortion. Rick Majerus is in his third season heading the St. Louis University men's basketball program after admitting during a TV interview at a January 2008 Hillary Clinton campaign rally that he is "pro-choice, personally." But will a Catholic institution hire a pro-choice coach? Somehow, during speculation that University of Cincinnati head football coach Brian Kelly is next in line to bear the Notre Dame football cross, the rumor spread that Kelly, an Irish Catholic who decades ago campaigned for Democratic presidential candidate Gary Hart, is pro-choice. But no one seems to know for sure. "I searched online media archives all day today trying to find one reputable media reference to Kelly's stance on abortion," read a Tuesday post by Brooks at sportsbybrooks.com. "I found none."


  • Wednesday, November, 11, 2009
    Hit 'Em Straight

    When the AB editors dedicated our July issue to best environmental practices in the athletics, fitness and recreation industries, we managed to overlook one egregious hazard to our planet's health: golf balls.