Dennis Van Milligen
Dennis Van Milligen has worked in business media for 15 years, the majority of that time spent as the editor in chief of a chemical engineering magazine. Since joining AB in 2013, Dennis helped launch Gameday Security, the official magazine of the the NCS4 focusing on protecting athletic and recreation events. A native of Wheaton, Ill., Dennis is a former All-State long distance runner who now uses whatever speed he has left to leg out doubles in recreational softball leagues. Dennis is a graduate of Lewis University in Romeoville, Ill., and resides in the Chicago suburbs with his wife and two young daughters who are repeatedly told how much Dennis is going to hate every one of their boyfriends.
  • Monday, July, 07, 2014
    Inside the 2014 NCS4 Conference

    The National Center for Spectator Sports Safety and Security will hold its fifth annual conference in Indianapolis, July 8-10. This year's theme of "The Business of Sports Safety and Security" fits perfectly with the evolving landscape of athletic security, according to NCS4 director Lou Marciani: "The security function's role is now more than ever a business one, as security has become a core function of finance, law, marketing and operations."


  • Tuesday, June, 24, 2014
    Tuesday Takedown: Security Fails Marring Best World Cup

    Security at this year's FIFA World Cup has been intensely scrutinized, starting months in advance as host country Brazil raced to get its stadiums ready for the 32-team tournament, a topic addressed by AB's Michael Gaio last month. Next came the safety of athletes, coaches and spectators.


  • Monday, June, 23, 2014
    Parent Behavior, Cyberbullying Hurting High School Sportsmanship

    It is widely acknowledged that the role of high school athletics is to promote life-skills education through sports, but lately a key life skill in this equation — sportsmanship — has deteriorated on the interscholastic level to the point that one high school athletic association recently considered banning the time-honored post-game handshake.


  • Tuesday, June, 17, 2014
    Tuesday Takedown: Little Sense in Volunteer-Coach Ban

    Being Father's Day last Sunday, I felt compelled to weigh in on a story that came across our newswire last week where a country board in South Carolina is considering banning volunteer parents from coaching to avoid the perceived "favoritism" that is apparently associated with parents coaching their children. Yes, you read correctly. At a time when we are dealing with a coaching crisis of sorts across the country and should be encouraging parents to be more involved in their child's life, there is a group out there that wants to ban those parents from not only helping their kids, but other kids on that sports team, as well.  


  • Tuesday, June, 10, 2014
    Tuesday Takedown: Witnessing a Health Club's Rebirth

    It is safe to say that necessity is the mother of reinvention these days in the health club industry. The rise of in-home fitness options and low-priced health clubs are certainly factors in fitness chains reinventing themselves and how they attract/retain members, but for the Midtown Athletic Club, neither played a role in its $1 million renovation this year. Rather, it was an industry trend driving its new approach and layout.


  • Tuesday, June, 03, 2014
    Absence of Accountability in Recent High School Attacks

    Toward the beginning of 2013, Lockport (N.Y.) High School athletic director Patrick Burke was the recipient of the 2013 Empire State Supervisors and Administrators Association's Administrator of the Year Award. He has been praised by his peers for his work ethic and leadership, and for being a role model at the school he loves and within the community he serves. Toward the end of 2013, Burke found himself the recipient of something entirely different: a beating by two intoxicated students he attempted to confront for unruly behavior at a basketball scrimmage.


  • Tuesday, May, 20, 2014
    Tuesday Takedown: Compression Socks Put to the Test

    I have to admit, I've heard the buzz on knee-high compression socks boosting running performance and improving recovery for quite some time, and have even done a little research on the subject to determine if I should be the next convert that says goodbye to ankle-high socks and hello to awkward tan lines. "Increase oxygen delivery." "Decrease lactic acid." "Prevent cramps." "Minimize muscle fatigue." In theory, that sounds great. But then you get to the part where researcher after researcher explain that little to no evidence exists supporting the claim that these garments actually do improve performance during exercise. But then something pretty spectacular happened last month. Meb Keflezighi became the first American to win the Boston Marathon in 31 years — and he did it wearing knee-high compression socks. 


  • Tuesday, May, 13, 2014
    Overcoming Gym Membership Retention Challenges

    The rise of lower-priced clubs have put greater pressure on gym owners to create an environment that keeps members happy while also empowering them to feel confident that their gym membership investment is well worth it. Ultimately, though, they may lose those members to lower-priced alternatives, writing off the member loss as simply a financial decision. The reality is that the warning signs were there; they just failed to see what was right in front of them.


  • Monday, May, 05, 2014
    Tuesday Takedown: The Sad Truth About False Accusations

    In the court of public opinion, there is no innocent until proven guilty. There is only guilty, even when proven innocent.


  • Tuesday, April, 29, 2014
    Tuesday Takedown: Coaches' Hazing Accountability

    Watertown (Mass.) High School's football team used to hold a camp with some long-standing traditions, some of which included forcing players to sit in urine, doing chores for veteran players and having younger players participate in a cookie run where the boys were stripped, cookies were placed in their buttocks, and they had to race across the field. If the cookie fell out, they were forced to eat it.


  • Monday, February, 23, 2015
    Blog: Misfiring on Active-Shooter Preparation

    Two years ago, while picking up my oldest daughter from school, I was overwhelmed with anxiety, fear and one all-consuming thought: Get her home.


  • Sunday, February, 08, 2015
    Back To School for My Collegiate Security Education

    Death Valley is the intimidating home field of LSU football where, on any given Saturday in the fall, the number of tailgating, non-ticket-holding fans can equal the 100,000+ entering the gates to watch their beloved Tigers. It's a security nightmare that requires meticulous planning, flawless execution, and a little help from your friends in the industry.


  • Monday, January, 26, 2015
    High Schools Earn Failing Grade in Security Planning

    It was a situation that, according to reports, school officials should've seen coming.


  • Wednesday, January, 07, 2015
    Paris a Somber Reminder What Lurks Around Each Corner

    The slaughter of more than a dozen people by masked gunmen at the Paris offices of satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo has provided a sickening reminder of the evil that lurks around every corner. There are still a lot of unknowns but what we do know is this: eight of the dead are journalists, two were police, one was a guest of the editorial board, and one was at the reception desk. The humanist in me mourns for the victims and their families. The journalist in me mourns for my media peers. But in this industry, that sadness must be repurposed in a focused direction. Paris is a reminder that this type of terrorist attack can happen anytime, and anywhere. It's why our mission to protect the sports we love, the fans we love, the athletes we love and the staff we love, is so important. 


  • Monday, December, 15, 2014
    Athletic Business Readers’ Support, Feedback Drive Growth

    Throughout the year, a hefty gentleman prone to wearing red receives millions of letters from children around the world asking for items that will make them happier — items they believe they have earned via behavior exhibited during that aforementioned year. While not quite as hefty and more open to other color combinations, I share some things in common with that jolly fella from up north. Specifically, I, too, receive letters every year, but these letters don't come from children. They are sent by the coaches and athletic administrators of these children, asking me for help or thanking me for providing them with the items they need to be successful.


  • Tuesday, December, 09, 2014
    Blog: The Day I Became a Sports Security Evangelist

    Life-changing events can happen at any time, and when you least expect it. It's common for events early in your personal life to shape you — I won a young author's contest and a big race in elementary school, which ultimately lead to me becoming a writer and runner. But to have it happen on a professional level, nearly 20 years into your career no less, is fairly uncommon. But that's exactly what happened when I attended the 2013 NCS4 Conference in Orlando just two weeks into my tenure at Athletic Business. To say the conference had a profound impact on me would be an understatement. The reality is this — Gameday Security™ exists because of that NCS4 Conference.


  • Monday, October, 20, 2014
    Improving Pool Safety with Model Aquatic Health Code

    The movie "Jaws" made you afraid to go into the water, but it was the inclusion of the "Jaws" theme music in another "scary" water scene five years later that likely resonated more with moviegoers. But instead of a shark, the object of fear was a Baby Ruth candy bar. Harold Ramis' classic comedy "Caddyshack" — virtually impossible not to quote while golfing nearly 35 years after its release — makes light of the pool safety nightmare known as a Code Brown, but that subject is certainly no laughing matter to pool operators tasked with keeping their aquatic facilities safe and clean.


  • Thursday, October, 09, 2014
    Fan Violence Reaching New Lows

    Levi's Stadium is the most technologically advanced stadium in the U.S., so why have people only been talking about what's happened in its bathrooms? The reason is a sickening video that shows a fan apparently telling another fan that a stall is open for him to use. The fan responds with three fast punches that knock that fan unconscious, rendering him partially paralyzed.


  • Tuesday, September, 16, 2014
    The Death of the Multisport Athlete

    Friday night lights are back for high schools across the country, and as you read this, many of the nation's top athletes are hard at work on the gridiron preparing for this week's upcoming game. I remember my first experience around a star athlete. I was 11 years old and my oldest brother was attending Wheaton North High School, which at that time was home to Kent Graham, the best high school athlete in the state of Illinois. Kent was a 6-foot-5-inch physical freak and the number-one-ranked quarterback in the nation. He also played safety. He earned three all-conference distinctions in basketball and regularly hit .400 for the baseball team. My dad fondly recalls Kent hitting a home run off my brother in Little League that cleared the lights and still hasn't landed.


  • Friday, August, 22, 2014
    Should Athletes Lose Scholarships Over Social Media Miscues?

    One of the debates that has intrigued me recently involves the increasing amount of coaches that are withdrawing scholarship offers due to a high school recruit exhibiting unacceptable or inappropriate behavior on social media. According to this story we published last week, high school coaches in Georgia are applauding University of Georgia head football coach Mark Richt for dropping a recruit that misbehaved on Twitter.