Paul Steinbach
Paul Steinbach joined the Athletic Business staff in November 1999, and now holds the title of senior editor. His work covering college athletics and sports facility operation has garnered several regional and national journalism honors, including a Jesse H. Neal National Business Journalism Award. He is a 1989 graduate of the University of Wisconsin and currently resides with his children Jack and Libby in his hometown of West Bend, Wis. In his spare time, he enjoys mowing patterns into his backyard ballpark — the naming rights to which are still available.
  • Thursday, July, 02, 2015
    Roll-Up Doors Flood Wellness Center Pool with Fresh Air

    In recreation centers, roll-up doors made of metal are typically used to allow for easy transport of equipment between indoor and outdoor activity spaces, or to close off storage areas or point-of-sale operations.


  • Friday, June, 26, 2015
    Report: FSU Freshman QB Punched Woman in Face

    More off-field quarterback controversy at Florida State. Seminoles head coach Jimbo Fisher has suspended freshman quarterback De’Andre Johnson indefinitely for an undisclosed violation of team rules.


  • Wednesday, June, 24, 2015
    Spectator Venues Are Realizing the Benefits of Downsizing Seating Capacity

    "You don't build the church for Easter Sunday," the saying goes, and the same applies to the sizing of today's sports cathedrals — the stadiums and arenas at the highest levels of competition — many of which are recognizing the strategic benefits of downsizing their seating capacities.


  • Thursday, June, 11, 2015
    U. of Alabama MAC Is a Transparent Showpiece

    By design, multipurpose activity courts are confined spaces — their dasher systems often relegated to out-of-the-way reaches of a recreation center's footprint. In some cases, MACs are completely enclosed rooms of floor-to-ceiling cinderblock. Not so at the University of Alabama's Student Activity Center at Presidential Village, where the MAC — and the activities it accommodates — is on full display. Glass dashers standing eight feet tall surround most of the synthetic playing surface lined for basketball, hockey and soccer, with netting extending to the rafters to keep projectiles in and out. Convertible goals can be recessed for soccer or brought into the field of play for hockey (with glass added to close off the rink end walls).

    The MAC is situated as one of three courts in an otherwise hardwood gym on the center's second level. It's the first element visitors see as they reach the top of a monumental staircase. Says Dave Larson, senior vice president and director of design for Bloomfield Hills, Mich.-based TMP Architecture Inc., "We wanted a transparent element that wouldn't break up the flow of the space visually."


    This article originally appeared in the May 2015 issue of Athletic Business with the title "Design Details"


  • Wednesday, May, 27, 2015
    Small Ice Rink Operators Warming to Solar Power

    It makes sense that there are more companies dealing in solar power in the state of Hawaii than there are those maintaining recreational ice. In fact, at last count, the breakdown was 300 to one. It makes even more sense, then, that Hawaii’s lone arena, the Ice Palace in Honolulu, is harnessing the power of the sun to optimize its operational efficiency.


  • Wednesday, May, 20, 2015
    Athletes-as-Employees Model Would Alter ND Approach

    The University of Notre Dame is the latest school to express that it would withdraw from the current setup of big-time college sports in the event student-athletes are deemed to be employees, according to athletic director Jack Swarbrick, who appeared as a panelist at a Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Sports meeting Tuesday.

    "Notre Dame's just not prepared to participate in any model where the athlete isn't a student first and foremost — that's the hallmark for us," Swarbrick told USA TODAY Sports. "If the entire model were to move toward athletes as employees, we'd head in a different direction. Our president has been clear about that. I'm not articulating a unique position."

    It's one that's not unique to Notre Dame, either. Northwestern University president emeritus Henry Beinen, a Knight Commission member, expressed a hope that Northwestern athletics would likewise seek a different approach to athletics, if the National Labor Relations Board concludes that an employer-employee relationship exists. The NLRB is deliberating the March 2014 ruling of regional director Peter Sung Ohr that Northwestern's scholarship football players are employees of the university, a ruling that included an order that Northwestern players vote on whether or not to unionize.

    "If we wound up with a business where you wound up paying the players to play, I think alumni would have a different view [of college sports]," Beinen said. "I think the faculty would be unaccepting of it, at least at universities like Northwestern and Stanford and maybe Notre Dame, Rice, Duke. … We haven't gotten there by a long shot. Will we? I don't know. I hope not."

    After appearing at a Congressional hearing on the Northwestern unionization effort last May, Stanford University athletic director Bernard Muir told USA Today Sports, "If [Stanford's athletes] are deemed employees, we will opt for a different model."

    Speaking at Tuesday's meeting, NCAA vice president Kevin Lennon reiterated the associations long-standing position that student-athletes are amateurs. “Amateur status, as defined by being college eligible, is compromised when they use their athletic skill for pay,” Lennon said. “The introduction of pay may lead some — not all, but some — to not take full advantage of these educational opportunities that are available to them in their college years.”


    Read more here: http://www.mcclatchydc.com/2015/05/19/267217/ncaa-urges-caution-on-idea-of.html#storylink=cpy

    Read more here: http://www.mcclatchydc.com/2015/05/19/267217/ncaa-urges-caution-on-idea-of.html#storylink=cpy

     


  • Wednesday, May, 20, 2015
    Synthetic Indoor Sports Systems Have Much to Offer

    Seen mostly in multipurpose activity courts, practice gyms and family life centers, synthetic indoor sports surfacing has not fully adhered itself to the consciousness of those specifying floors in competition venues — at least not in the United States, where hardwood has been considered the basketball gold standard for more than a century.


  • Tuesday, May, 12, 2015
    Specialized Gym Owner Spreads Exercise-Is-Medicine Mindset

    Leave it to a Ph.D. in neuroscience to think big. In February 2012, Becky Farley opened what she says is still the world's only community center dedicated to physically training people diagnosed with Parkinson's disease. Last July, Parkinson Wellness Recovery — or PWR!Gym, as its known in its hometown Tucson, Ariz., and beyond — doubled in size to 6,000 square feet. But those expanded walls have done little to limit the imagination of Farley, who sees her exercise-is-medicine mindset spreading into North American communities' YMCAs and Jewish Community Centers — anywhere with space and trainers willing to challenge patients to strive for, in her words, "bigger, faster movement." Senior editor Paul Steinbach asked Farley, who says she has a waiting list of people seeking license to open their own PWR!Gyms, to share her grand vision. 


  • Monday, May, 11, 2015
    Design Details: New Use for Repurposed Basketball Floor

    Several athletic facilities have taken hardwood from dismantled gymnasium floors and found new uses for it, but few have gotten as much mileage out of the concept as Delaware State University's Wellness and Recreation Center.


  • Tuesday, May, 05, 2015
    Virginia Tech Professor Explains Helmet Research

    In February, the NFL suspended its concussion research program employing helmet sensors, citing player privacy and data-reliability concerns. Stefan Duma disagrees with that decision. After attending a military conference in 2003, the head of Virginia Tech's biomechanical engineering department helped the Hokies football program become the first in the nation to track head impacts.


  • Monday, November, 10, 2014
    Get to Know Your Peers When Attending ABC

    This is a story about a conversation Lou Holtz and I never had.


  • Tuesday, August, 12, 2014
    Robin Williams Drew Attention to Inaugural Augie’s BASH

    Robin Williams possessed the kind of frenetic magnetism that dared you to look away. For me, it wasn’t possible. The actor/comedian’s larger-than-life persona was tailor-made for a movie screen.


  • Thursday, January, 17, 2013
    Blog: The Tangled Webs of Lance Armstrong, Manti Te'o

    The twisted tales of Lance Armstrong and Manti Te'o are now intertwined. Heroes to many, these athletes have lived lies before our eyes, and now those lies are unraveling within the same week.


  • Monday, December, 03, 2012
    Blog: The Life and Death of Rick Majerus

    The first time I saw Rick Majerus in person, he was sitting in seldom-used end-court bleachers that had been wheeled into position for a Wisconsin Interscholastic Athletic Association Class C basketball sectional at my high school alma mater's field house. I was there to cover a game for my hometown newspaper, The West Bend News. Majerus, an assistant coach at Marquette at the time (this was the mid-'80s), was there to scout Kohler, Wis., phenom Joe Wolf, who would eventually attend North Carolina.


  • Sunday, January, 17, 2010
    Blog: Still Believing, 34 Years (and Counting) Later

    Editor's Note: AB Senior Editor Paul Steinbach authored this piece in January 2010, but with February 22nd marking the 34th anniversary of the Miracle on Ice and the U.S. men's hockey team facing off against Canada on Friday, the message still rings true.

    For nearly 30 years now, the 1980 U.S. Olympic hockey team has been an off-and-on obsession of mine.


  • Thursday, December, 10, 2009
    A Choice to Make

    There's precedent for a Catholic institution sticking with a coach despite his pro-choice stance on abortion. Rick Majerus is in his third season heading the St. Louis University men's basketball program after admitting during a TV interview at a January 2008 Hillary Clinton campaign rally that he is "pro-choice, personally." But will a Catholic institution hire a pro-choice coach? Somehow, during speculation that University of Cincinnati head football coach Brian Kelly is next in line to bear the Notre Dame football cross, the rumor spread that Kelly, an Irish Catholic who decades ago campaigned for Democratic presidential candidate Gary Hart, is pro-choice. But no one seems to know for sure. "I searched online media archives all day today trying to find one reputable media reference to Kelly's stance on abortion," read a Tuesday post by Brooks at sportsbybrooks.com. "I found none."


  • Wednesday, November, 11, 2009
    Hit 'Em Straight

    When the AB editors dedicated our July issue to best environmental practices in the athletics, fitness and recreation industries, we managed to overlook one egregious hazard to our planet's health: golf balls.