RECENT ARTICLES
  • How Will Restructured NCAA Play Out for Members?

    by Dave Hickman April 2014

    Nothing suggested last week by a seven-member NCAA steering committee looking into the separation of the haves from the have-nots is etched in stone. A lot of it, though, is fascinating.

  • SEC Maintains 8-Game Conference Football Scheduling

    by David Paschall April 2014

    The Southeastern Conference announced Sunday that it will continue with its football scheduling format consisting of eight league games and with one permanent opponent from the opposite division. With the arrival of Missouri and Texas A&M before the 2012 season, the SEC developed the 6-1-1 format and used it for the bridge schedules of the past two seasons and for the next two seasons as well. League presidents and athletic directors have debated in recent months whether to go permanently to nine SEC games or remain at eight with a 6-0-2 format that would eliminate permanent foes from opposite divisions, but the existing format will be used for 2016 and well beyond. One tweak to the schedule moving forward is that every SEC team must play one game against an opponent from the ACC, Big 12, Big Ten or Pac-12 on an annual basis. This change has no effect on Florida, Georgia, Kentucky and South Carolina, who will end each season against its respective state rival from the ACC.

  • CFB Players, Coaches Welcome Summer Practice Changes

    by Lya Wodraska, The Salt Lake Tribune April 2014

    Summer is supposed to be a relatively quiet time for college football players, with the only team-related items on their calendars being voluntary workouts. However, anyone who knows much about college football knows the workouts are anything but voluntary -- unless a player wants to risk falling significantly behind his teammates. If you want to play, you'd better practice. That is the unspoken rule for most college programs.

  • Northwestern Football Players Cast Historic Union Vote

    by Michael Gaio April 2014

    Northwestern football players cast their votes to determine if they will unionize Friday morning. The vote by about 70 scholarship players will be watched closesly by colleges and universities across the country due to the impact it could have on the dynamics of college athletics. However, the outcome of the vote may not be known for some time.

  • NCAA Endorses Autonomy for 'Power Five' Conferences

    by Michael Gaio April 2014

    The NCAA took a major step toward restructuring its governing system for the "Power Five" conferences on Thursday.

  • Looking Back to 1989: Future Games

    by Rick Berg April 2014

    A March court ruling granting football players at Northwestern University the right to unionize has left everyone speculating about the future of the NCAA, but such speculation has been floating around longer than most of today’s college athletes have been alive. Check out the predictions about the NCAA’s future set forth in this AB article from December 1989.

  • Kansas Senate Approves Tax Break for Health Clubs

    by Emily Attwood April 2014

    After a long and heated debate, the Kansas Senate approved a bill on Friday exempting for-profit health clubs from paying property taxes on the premise that such businesses face unfair competition from nonprofits such as the YMCA. 

  • Athletes' Unionization Attempt Scores Major Victory

    by Michael Gaio March 2014

    In their attempt to unionize college athletes, the Northwestern football players and the recently formed College Athletes Players Association scored a major victory on Wednesday.

  • HS Baseball Player with Rare Disease Deemed Eligible

    by March 2014

    Competing in sports at the high school level is no easy feat, but for one Louisiana high school student becoming eligible to compete has been a challenge in itself.

    The Louisiana High School Athletic Association ruled that 18-year-old Sean Thiel was ineligible to participate in spring baseball this season after missing too many days of school. The absences were caused by a rare medical condition from which Thiel suffers known as achalasia. The disease affects the esophagus’s ability to move food to the stomach, which led to a number of absences — including a surgery at the Mayo Clinic to stabilize his condition in early March.

    According to The Advocate, after filing a federal suit against the LHSAA March 3, Thiel was finally granted a hardship waiver that allowed him to begin playing earlier this month.

    "I commend the LHSAA for taking another look at this. We have no ill will. We're just happy they re-evaluated the situation," Michael Thiel told The Advocate Friday. "It is a positive story for a change. It's the right result.”

    "It reinforces your faith in humanity."

    Hardship waivers are used in high school sports to help make a student eligible for competition if he has a condition that causes him to not meet the requirements for eligibility. As a part of the lawsuit that brought Thiel’s situation to the LHSAA’s attention, Thiel’s family claimed that the LHSAA had violated the Americans With Disabilities Act by not allowing Thiel to play baseball even though he met the requirements for a hardship waiver.

    After Thiel became eligible to play, Thiel’s family dropped the suit March 18.

    As part of the agreement with the LHSAA, Thiel — a high school sophomore — must meet all future eligibility requirements if he wishes to continue playing high school sports in his junior and senior seasons.

    Thiel’s father told The Advocate his son has already recorded a couple of hits in two games since his reinstatement on the team.

  • Blog: Every Athlete Deserves a Certified Athletic Trainer

    by Mike Hopper, Guest Contributor March 2014

    Youth sports injuries seem to continue to pile up. Unfortunately so do the fatalities. In recent years, we’ve heard about many football players who have died after suffering brain trauma. We’ve heard reports of athletes who have died of sudden cardiac death. And we’ve heard of athletes dying of heat illnesses such as exertional heat stroke or sickle cell anemia. In response to that, there have been significant regulations in the way of law or league policies for these various cases.