RECENT ARTICLES
  • U. of Maryland Eyes Cole Field House as Football Facility

    by Michael Gaio November 2014

    Maryland has moved from a “basketball conference” in the ACC to a “football conference” in the Big Ten, at least in the eyes of head football coach Randy Edsall.

  • Designing the Modern College Football Practice Facility

    by Emily Attwood November 2014

    Recruiting the best athletes is only part of staying ahead of the competition in college athletics; schools also need to have the resources to train the best athletes.

  • 2014 Facilities of Merit: Middlebury College Squash Center

    by AB Editors October 2014

    Middlebury College Squash Center | Middlebury, Vt.

    There are upgrades, and then there is the Middlebury College Squash Center, which replaces an air-supported structure incapable of hosting tournaments.

  • 2014 Facilities of Merit: Holaday Athletic Center

    by AB Editors October 2014

    Holaday Athletic Center | U.S. Air Force Academy | USAFA, Colo.

    Standing six and a half stories tall and housing a regulation-size football field, the Holaday Center makes an impression based on size alone, but its design specifics drew accolades from judges.

  • Coming Monday: 2014 Facilities of Merit Winners

    by AB Editors October 2014

    For two weeks beginning Monday, the 10 winners of the 2014 Facilities of Merit awards will be announced on AthleticBusiness.com.

  • Multipurpose Activity Courts Deliver Campus Rec Options

    by Paul Steinbach September 2014

    They are confined playing fields with near-limitless functionality. Since their rise to prominence on college campuses two decades ago, multipurpose activity courts have maintained their go-to status among both recreation facility designers and end-users looking to pack the most programming punch into one self-contained indoor space.

  • Video: 2014 Facilities of Merit Preview

    by Michael Gaio August 2014

    The Architectural Showcase is always one of the highlights of the year here at Athletic Business. We invite architects, builders, consultants and facility owners to submit their best work from the previous three years. The difficult part is choosing just 10 of these outstanding facilities to earn the honor of being recognized as our Facilities of Merit.

  • Spontaneous Combustion of Oily Rags Causes HS Court Fire

    by AB Editors August 2014

    Editor's Note: This article was originally posted by Hardwood Floors, AB's sister publication.

    The start of school for a number of high school students in Green Bay, Wis., will be delayed until mid-September due to smoke damage from a fire that started after rags used to clean up a refinishing job spontaneously combusted in the middle of the night. 

  • How Facility Location Impacts the Building Process

    by Ralph Agostinelli July 2014

    I’m heading down to Nantucket next week. That’s not unusual. I head down to Nantucket every week, since we’re building a Boys & Girls Club addition there. But doing business on Nantucket is very unusual — and it drives home the message of how construction projects play out in different locations.

    Prospective building owners often assume that you can take a $10 million rec center in one location, plop it down in another location, and it’ll still be a $10 million rec center. Many of them are surprised to hear that a 14-month construction schedule in one place might — with the same program, square footage and materials — be a 16-month job in another. Nantucket is the proof that there is no “normal.”

    The nature of working on an island is that everything costs more and takes longer. This can also be true of other more-remote, rural locations. But Nantucket has other issues, too. Tourism is its primary source of revenue, and it’s seasonal revenue. To protect its tourism interests, there’s a local statute that bars construction within the downtown commercial district during the summer. This not only shortens the construction season to eight and a half months in that area, it eliminates the prime construction season.

    RELATED: Understanding Bids and Specs: Get the Best Value When Building

    The year-round population has doubled since 1980, to around 10,000. The summertime population is 55,000. If you are in an area where construction can proceed during the summer, as our project is, that means transportation snags and bottlenecks, and inevitably higher prices on goods and services. In the winter, weather can wreak its own havoc on transportation, and the availability of on-island labor can drop in sync with the seasonal population drop.

    When we estimate costs on a proposed project, we take all of these things into account — the distance that labor and materials must travel to reach the job site, expected weather patterns, local laws that might impinge on the project, costs associated with different trades or unions, and many other seemingly minor aspects of management. It’s particularly helpful when prospective building owners have an understanding of the local political culture and an awareness of regional differences that could account for variances in cost. We cover this early and often, describing what we see as the unique local variables that go with each project — the kinds of things that owners might not, but should, think about.

    More from Ralph Agostinelli:


    Ralph J Agostinelli, PE (ragostinelli@stanmar-inc.com) is senior project manager at Stanmar Inc., a Wayland, Mass., design-build firm specializing in athletic and recreation facilities.

  • End-to-End Practice Courts Afford K-State Flexibility

    by Paul Steinbach June 2014

    When one thinks of multi-court gymnasiums, a boxy side-by-side configuration typically comes to mind. The two-year-old basketball training facility at Kansas State University, designed by Kansas City, Mo.-based Populous, instead features two courts placed end to end.