RECENT ARTICLES
  • Are Baby Boomers Exercising for the Right Reasons?

    by Andrew Brandt August 2014

    Baby boomers were the first American generation to wholly embrace regular exercise, and as reported in a recently published study in the International Journal of Wellbeing, they're still at it today.

  • Study: Sports Participation Makes for Better Employees

    by Rexford Sheild July 2014

    Playing sports has been associated with a long list of benefits related to physical, mental and social development among youths. Now, add career longevity to that list. Kevin Kniffin, a behavioral science professor at Cornell University, along with Brian Wansink and Mitsuru Shimizu, found that people who played youth and high school sports made better employees later in life and had more career opportunities.

  • Six Strategies for Selling Club Memberships

    by Rob Bishop and Barry Klein July 2014

    Let's take it as a given that most consumers assume that the process of buying a health club membership will be sales-intensive. Our entire industry has been painted as having high-pressure, lock-people-in-a-cubicle-until-they-sign methods, and consumers enter most clubs with their guard up, waiting for the hard sell.

  • Virtual Group Exercise Classes Benefit End-Users, Clubs

    by John Agoglia July 2014

    Today's world is "on demand." Didn't catch your favorite TV show? Just watch it on your laptop tomorrow — or wait until the end of the season and binge-watch the entire year. Heard about a great "Tonight Show" sketch? Just go to YouTube. Want to take a group exercise class that's not offered when you're free? Well, there is a growing answer to that, too, and it doesn't involve people moving furniture around their living rooms to make room to follow along with a DVD.

  • Study: Lack of Exercise, Not Over-Eating Behind Obesity

    by Rexford Sheild, Athletic Business Intern July 2014

    As our country's obesity problem has gained more attention in recent years, many have looked to identify the root of the problem. A recent 20-year study conducted by Stanford University revealed that obesity is not due primarily to over-eating but rather a decline in exercise, which leads to increases in average body mass index (BMI). Categories examined by lead author Uri Ladabaum and his colleagues include: obesity, waistline obesity, physical activity and calorie intake. 

    "Our findings do not support the popular notion that the increase of obesity in the United States can be attributed primarily to sustained increase over time in the average daily caloric intake of Americans," said Ladabaum, an associate professor of medicine at Stanford. "We found a significant association between the level of leisure-time physical activity, but not daily caloric intake, and the increases in BMI and waist circumference."

    In 1994, only 19.1 percent of women admitted to not having any physical activity in their lifestyle, but by 2010, 51.7 percent for women reported that they did not work out. Men only produced 11.4 percent of those who didn't work out in 1994, but saw an increase in 2010 to 43.5 percent. BMI has increased 0.37 percent per year for women and 0.27 percent for men. The researchers found this was the case for both normal-weight and overweight women, while only for overweight men.

    Racial groups hit hardest by lack of exercise are African-American and Mexican-American women, according to the study. 

  • Tuesday Takedown: Witnessing a Health Club's Rebirth

    by Dennis Van Milligen June 2014

    It is safe to say that necessity is the mother of reinvention these days in the health club industry. The rise of in-home fitness options and low-priced health clubs are certainly factors in fitness chains reinventing themselves and how they attract/retain members, but for the Midtown Athletic Club, neither played a role in its $1 million renovation this year. Rather, it was an industry trend driving its new approach and layout.

  • Overcoming Gym Membership Retention Challenges

    by Dennis Van Milligen May 2014

    The rise of lower-priced clubs have put greater pressure on gym owners to create an environment that keeps members happy while also empowering them to feel confident that their gym membership investment is well worth it. Ultimately, though, they may lose those members to lower-priced alternatives, writing off the member loss as simply a financial decision. The reality is that the warning signs were there; they just failed to see what was right in front of them.

  • Study: Concessions at Youth Baseball Encourage Obesity

    by May 2014

    A new study published in Childhood Obesity earlier this month suggests that youth baseball may actually do more to promote obesity than curb it.

    The study, conducted by the Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, found that youth baseball players between the ages of eight and 11 years old at a North Carolina youth baseball complex consumed high-calorie food items 72 percent of the time and drank  sugar-sweetened beverages 53 percent of the time. Ninety percent of food consumed was purchased from concession stands.

    Some of the most commonly consumed foods: French fries, candy and cookies. 

    As a result, children involved in youth baseball could be consuming more calories than they burn off playing baseball, which leaves them at risk for weight-management and obesity problems. 

    “Though youth sports are an excellent way to promote physical activity, social interaction and positive health behaviors, the food environments are often characterized by less healthy food options with high-calorie contents and lower nutrient density,” senior author Joseph Skelton, MD, MS, said in a press release.

    According to the Center for Disease Control, nearly 18 percent of children between the ages of six and 11 were considered obese in 2012 — up from only seven percent in 1980. Obesity can put children at risk for many immediate and long-term health effects.

    With these risks in mind, the Wake Forest Baptist study called for parents to play a more active role in ensuring young athletes receive the proper diet at the ballpark.

    “Parents should plan ahead for these busy times and even advocate in their local sports leagues for policies that address snacks and drinks,” co-author Megan Irby, MS, said.

  • Blog: Does Wearable Fitness Have Legs?

    by Rob Bishop and Barry Klein April 2014

    Wearable fitness tracking technology is the future!

    Such excitement was so early-2014. We saw articles in The Wall Street Journal that described how corporate CEOs were big users of wearables and how they were competing against each other to see who could sleep better or walk more. BusinessWeek ran a story earlier this year that discussed the possibility — the likelihood? — of wearables putting gyms out of business. The New York Times ran a piece two weeks ago today about how wearables were being used in gyms.

  • Blog: Wine at the Gym? I’ll Drink to That

    by Emily Attwood April 2014

    Cardio equipment? Check. Towel service? Check. Group exercise schedule? Check. Liquor license? Pending.