RECENT ARTICLES
  • Rethinking PE Class

    by Emily Attwood August 2014

    Not every kid likes to play sports. For the athletically disinclined, a game of gym class dodgeball or basketball can be an anxiety-inducing experience. In fact, a recent study by researchers at Brigham Young University found that kids who were ridiculed in gym class (by peers and teachers) were less likely to engage in physical activity one year later — not good news for a nation facing an obesity and sedentary-lifestyle epidemic.

  • Take Our Fitness Offerings Survey, Enter to Win ABC Reg

    by AB Editors August 2014

    Ever wonder how your facility’s fitness programs and classes stack up against others in the industry? Here’s your chance to find out. Athletic Business is conducting an industry-wide survey to learn more about fitness facility classes and programs. Please take a few minutes to answer the following survey questions, and look for a compilation of industry-wide results in our October issue. 

  • Climbing Gyms Proliferate as the Sport Takes Hold

    by Emily Attwood August 2014

    Call it a sport. Call it a recreational activity. Call it a great workout. Just don't call it a fad. Participation in rock climbing has been steadily increasing for years, and climbing walls — already commonplace in campus and municipal recreation centers — are popping up in high schools and elementary schools, parks and health clubs, even stadiums.

  • Lessons from Our Club’s Response to an Onsite Fatality

    by Rob Bishop and Barry Klein August 2014

    Please read this column.

  • Are Baby Boomers Exercising for the Right Reasons?

    by Andrew Brandt August 2014

    Baby boomers were the first American generation to wholly embrace regular exercise, and as reported in a recently published study in the International Journal of Wellbeing, they're still at it today.

  • Study: Sports Participation Makes for Better Employees

    by Rexford Sheild July 2014

    Playing sports has been associated with a long list of benefits related to physical, mental and social development among youths. Now, add career longevity to that list. Kevin Kniffin, a behavioral science professor at Cornell University, along with Brian Wansink and Mitsuru Shimizu, found that people who played youth and high school sports made better employees later in life and had more career opportunities.

  • Six Strategies for Selling Club Memberships

    by Rob Bishop and Barry Klein July 2014

    Let's take it as a given that most consumers assume that the process of buying a health club membership will be sales-intensive. Our entire industry has been painted as having high-pressure, lock-people-in-a-cubicle-until-they-sign methods, and consumers enter most clubs with their guard up, waiting for the hard sell.

  • Virtual Group Exercise Classes Benefit End-Users, Clubs

    by John Agoglia July 2014

    Today's world is "on demand." Didn't catch your favorite TV show? Just watch it on your laptop tomorrow — or wait until the end of the season and binge-watch the entire year. Heard about a great "Tonight Show" sketch? Just go to YouTube. Want to take a group exercise class that's not offered when you're free? Well, there is a growing answer to that, too, and it doesn't involve people moving furniture around their living rooms to make room to follow along with a DVD.

  • Study: Lack of Exercise, Not Over-Eating Behind Obesity

    by Rexford Sheild, Athletic Business Intern July 2014

    As our country's obesity problem has gained more attention in recent years, many have looked to identify the root of the problem. A recent 20-year study conducted by Stanford University revealed that obesity is not due primarily to over-eating but rather a decline in exercise, which leads to increases in average body mass index (BMI). Categories examined by lead author Uri Ladabaum and his colleagues include: obesity, waistline obesity, physical activity and calorie intake. 

    "Our findings do not support the popular notion that the increase of obesity in the United States can be attributed primarily to sustained increase over time in the average daily caloric intake of Americans," said Ladabaum, an associate professor of medicine at Stanford. "We found a significant association between the level of leisure-time physical activity, but not daily caloric intake, and the increases in BMI and waist circumference."

    In 1994, only 19.1 percent of women admitted to not having any physical activity in their lifestyle, but by 2010, 51.7 percent for women reported that they did not work out. Men only produced 11.4 percent of those who didn't work out in 1994, but saw an increase in 2010 to 43.5 percent. BMI has increased 0.37 percent per year for women and 0.27 percent for men. The researchers found this was the case for both normal-weight and overweight women, while only for overweight men.

    Racial groups hit hardest by lack of exercise are African-American and Mexican-American women, according to the study. 

  • Tuesday Takedown: Witnessing a Health Club's Rebirth

    by Dennis Van Milligen June 2014

    It is safe to say that necessity is the mother of reinvention these days in the health club industry. The rise of in-home fitness options and low-priced health clubs are certainly factors in fitness chains reinventing themselves and how they attract/retain members, but for the Midtown Athletic Club, neither played a role in its $1 million renovation this year. Rather, it was an industry trend driving its new approach and layout.