RECENT ARTICLES
  • TSSAA Approves $500 Fine for Criticizing Game Officials

    by Chris Thomas chris.thomas@knoxnews.com Chris Thomas covers high school sports. Follow him at twitter.com/christhomaskns. December 2014

    The Tennessee Secondary School Athletic Association legislative council approved a proposal on Wednesday that could fine a school $500 if one of its coaches or administrators publicly criticize game officials.

  • Junior Squash Scene Heating up in New York

    by Zoe Pearce; NeXt Correspondent December 2014

    An increasing number of colleges are building squash programs and looking for high school players to fill their rosters. Also, given Buffalo's winters, squash is a very practical sport because it is played indoors and can, therefore, be played regardless of the weather.

  • Should a HS Game Be Replayed Due to Ref's Mistake?

    by Andrew Brandt December 2014

    In Oklahoma, a high school football game has never been replayed for legal reasons.

  • School's 8-Student Class Comprises Basketball Team

    by Jeff Miller, @Jeff55Jeff December 2014

    The Pirates' game-day roster routinely consists of four boys and three girls, a hybrid allowed by the state governing body for public school athletics to field a full starting lineup.

  • Prep Title Games Draw Nearly 60K to Ohio Stadium

    by Marc Pendleton, Dayton Daily News December 2014

    The most impressive statistic from last week's high school football championships at Ohio Stadium? A total attendance of 59,373.

  • In Maine, Minor Changes Coming to Football Classes

    by Travis Lazarczyk Morning Sentinel December 2014

    A few teams will play in new leagues because of rising or declining enrollment. Class C runner-up Leavitt is among the schools moving. Leavitt's enrollment of 613 put it just above the new Class B cutoff of 586, meaning the Hornets are slated to join Western B under this proposal. Nokomis, which played down in Class C the last two years, will move to Eastern Class B.

  • High School Football Participation Up After Decline

    by Dennis Van Milligen December 2014

    When you take a quick look at recent youth and high school football participation numbers, the picture isn't very pretty. Participation in Pop Warner decreased nearly 10 percent from 2010 to 2012, and numerous state high school associations have reported similar declines in their respective football numbers — since 2007, for example, Michigan's numbers have decreased more than 10 percent. According to statistics from the National Federation of State High School Associations, from 2007 to 2012, nationwide participation dipped by 20,000.

  • WIAA Tourney Success May Factor in Division Shuffling

    by MARK STEWART December 2014

    Members of the WIAA's committee on competitive equality presented a plan to improve competitive balance in state tournaments to the Board of Control on Friday.

  • IHSA: Concussion Lawsuit Could End Football for Some

    by Tony Baranek. tbaranek@southtownstar.com December 2014

    The Illinois High School Association's executive director adamantly warned Friday that a lawsuit filed against the association seeking, among other things, the mandatory presence of medical personnel at football games and practices, would have a devastating effect on some schools across the state.

  • New Transgender Athlete Policies Approved in Minn., Va.

    by Emily Attwood December 2014

    Following successful votes by their respective high school governing bodies, transgender student-athletes at high schools in Minnesota and Virginia will be able to participate in sports based on their identified gender. 

    "I applaud the Minnesota High School League's decision to pass a proposal that tells trans students in our community their identities matter just as much as everyone else's," said Congressman Keith Ellison in a written statement. "At a time when so many transgender students are bullied and harassed in the schoolyard, the MSHSL's decision recognizes their dignity and humanity on and off the playing field. All trans students are asking for is to be treated as human beings and I stand with them."

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    The policy has been getting a lot of attention in Minnesota over the past few months, delaying a vote initially planned for October after more than 10,000 emails were sent to league officials voicing opinions on the issue. Once again, supporters and opponents of the policy packed the meeting room for this week's vote, holding signs expressing their opinions. The new policy, approved by 18 of 20 board members, specifically addresses the participation of students born male but identifying as female participating in girls' sports, as state law already allows for girls' participation in boys' sports.

    "We would not want to take away that privilege from anyone, but the answer is not to say that you should be given special privileges above and beyond everyone else," said Autumn Leva of the Minnesota Family Council, which submitted a petition with more than 5,000 signatures opposing the policy. "The answer isn't to say we're just going to completely ignore physical realities, especially in the world of physical sports." 

    The new policy in Virginia amends one passed by the Virginia High School League last February that included the requirement that students must undergo gender reassignment surgery before being allowed to play for a team matching their identified gender. The requirement was viewed as too strict and unobtainable, since reassignment surgery is rarely approved for those under the age of 18.

    RELATED: AIA Approves First Out Transgender HS Athlete

    While the new policy removes this restriction, students must still meet a variety of criteria before their participation on a particular sports team is approved. Students must submit a personal statement affirming their gender identity, as well as testimonies from family or peers, and must demonstrate that they have begun some type of hormone therapy. 

    The materials must then be submitted to the VHSL district committee, which will review the materials and make a recommendation to VHSL’s executive director. If the request is approved, a student is immediately eligible to begin participating in a sport. If denied, a student can appeal the decision.

    In Minnesota, students must submit statements from parents and healthcare professionals, leaving the decision up to the school's activities director, though appeals will be conducted by an independent party. The new policy will take effect beginning with the 2015-16 school year. Private schools will be exempt from the policy under state and federal law. The MHSL’s approval of the new policy brings the number of states with some type of policy addressing transgender student participation in high school activities to 33.

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