RECENT ARTICLES
  • Do Later School Start Times Benefit Student-Athletes?

    by Andrew Brandt September 2014

    Next year, three high schools in Virginia's Fauquier County are making the move to a new athletic conference, a transition that has some worried that the new competition has an unfair advantage: sleep. High schools in neighboring Loudoun county start later, at approximately 9 a.m. It's not a difference that most athletic programs might think of, but there's a growing body of evidence to suggest that later school start times are crucial to improving students' performance, academic and physical.

  • The Death of the Multisport Athlete

    by September 2014

    Friday night lights are back for high schools across the country, and as you read this, many of the nation's top athletes are hard at work on the gridiron preparing for this week's upcoming game. I remember my first experience around a star athlete. I was 11 years old and my oldest brother was attending Wheaton North High School, which at that time was home to Kent Graham, the best high school athlete in the state of Illinois. Kent was a 6-foot-5-inch physical freak and the number-one-ranked quarterback in the nation. He also played safety. He earned three all-conference distinctions in basketball and regularly hit .400 for the baseball team. My dad fondly recalls Kent hitting a home run off my brother in Little League that cleared the lights and still hasn't landed.

  • Amendment Takes Virginia into New Concussion Terrain

    by Andrew Brandt September 2014

    The revisions to Virginia student-athlete concussion law this past spring seemed straightforward enough, but an overlooked amendment included in the law is catching some by surprise.

  • High School AD Pleads Guilty to Bid-Rigging

    by Andrew Brandt September 2014

    Fitzgerald Barnes, athletic director at Monticello High School in Charlottesville, Va., pleaded guilty to embezzling money from federal taxpayers on Friday in federal court.

  • Former HS Basketball Player Cut from Team, Sues School

    by Michael Gaio September 2014

    Getting cut from a high school athletic team can be a tough pill to swallow. For former Ohio basketball player Chase Johanson, the remedy has come in the form of a lawsuit.

  • Study: Fitness Lessens Depression Risk for Young Girls

    by Rexford Sheild August 2014

    According to the National Comorbidity Survey-Adolescent Supplement, roughly 11 percent of adolescents experience a depressive disorder by age 18. However, in a recent study led by Camilo Ruggero of North Texas, there may be a solution to combat this issue, especially for young middle school girls. Ruggero and his team, presenting at the 122nd Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association in Washington, D.C., last Thursday, suggested that getting teenage girls physically fit can combat the risks of depression. 

  • Miami-Dade Schools to Introduce Steroid Testing Pilot

    by Rexford Sheild August 2014

    After Tony Bosch and a slew of his associates were arrested in connection with providing steroids to MLB players as well as high school athletes on Tuesday, the Miami-Dade School Board introduced a steroid testing pilot program that is slated to begin during the 2014-15 school year. 

  • Study: Sports Participation Makes for Better Employees

    by Rexford Sheild July 2014

    Playing sports has been associated with a long list of benefits related to physical, mental and social development among youths. Now, add career longevity to that list. Kevin Kniffin, a behavioral science professor at Cornell University, along with Brian Wansink and Mitsuru Shimizu, found that people who played youth and high school sports made better employees later in life and had more career opportunities.

  • Arizona High Schools Face Postseason Participation Fees

    by Rexford Sheild July 2014

    The price of success is oftentimes categorized by hard work, but high school athletic departments and their athletes in Arizona will soon have to rethink this ideology. The Arizona Interscholastic Association (AIA) will enforce teams to pay a fee if they are a participant in postseason play. The new fee is slated to kick in this fall.

  • N.C. High Schools Hope to Meet Title IX Standards with Stunt

    by Andrew Brandt June 2014

    In 2010, the Office of Civil Rights deemed that both traditional and competitive cheerleading did not meet the requirements of Title IX to be considered sports.

    The sport called stunt, a cross between gymnastics and competitive cheerleading, has been constructed to meet those standards.

    Related: Cheer Evolving, But Will NCAA Call It an Emerging Sport?

    According to The State, stunt will begin making waves across Wake County, N.C. high schools next spring. The sport will consist of both regular head-to-head matches and competitions, which will be divided into four parts: partner stunts, pyramids and tosses, group jumps and tumbling and team performance.

    By beginning in the spring, stunt won’t have to jockey for gym time with existing sports like basketball and volleyball. And like diving, stunt scores will be determined by mastery. Rather than create new moves, participants are required to perfect particular routines.

    Wake County will be the first in the state to offer stunt as a competitive sport, and their hope that it introduces more girls to interscholastic athletics is a promising one. “There is a tremendous amount of interest in it,” said Darren Coe, the Wake County Schools senior administrator for athletics.

    Related: AMA: Cheerleading as Rigorous, Risky as Any Sport

    Previously, Wake County didn’t have a high enough percentage of girls competing to meet Title IX standards. And the North Carolina High School Athletic Association currently hosts championships in 11 sports for boys—and only 10 for girls.

    If stunt raises enough interest, however, it could very well become sport number 11 for girls. Here’s to hoping stunt becomes something greater than its name suggests.