RECENT ARTICLES
  • HS Installs Synthetic Turf as Facility Revamp Begins

    by Ryan Collingwood August 2017

    Of the eight Northwest Conference football members last fall, Whitworth was the only team without artificial turf. Playing games at the well-manicured Pine Bowl was well and good, but even tiny Washington high schools were going the synthetic route.

  • HS Can't Find Players for 6-Player Football Team

    by Zach Duncan August 2017

    While six-man football programs around the state began two-a-day practices on Monday, the Harrold Hornets weren't one of them. Fresh off national exposure from an ESPN documentary and accompanying longform story, the Hornets aren't likely to field a football team for the 2017 season. Harrold coach Craig Templeton said Tuesday there's only three varsity boys plus senior volleyball player Olivia Perez, who suited up last season so that the Hornets could compete.

  • HS Sports Participation Reaches All-Time High

    by Jason Scott August 2017

     A survey conducted by the National Federation of State High School Associations found that more high school-aged students than ever before are participating in high school sports.

  • Florida High Schools Struggle to Fund AT Programs

    by Courtney Cameron August 2017

    Athletic trainers in the state of Florida are looking around and starting to feel the fear, as several counties are being forced to cut full-time trainers from their school budgets.

  • Short-Lived Coaches Raise Hiring Practice Questions

    by Jason Scott August 2017

    An Idaho school district is looking at its hiring practices after it rescinded job offers to two brand new coaches once details of their pasts came to light.

  • HS Football Coach Suspended Again Amid Grading Probe

    by Jennifer Pignolet July 2017

    Shelby County Schools suspended head football coach Teli White for the second time in June, according to an email...

  • District Releases New Athletics Transfer Rule

    by Joe Sirera July 2017

    Students and parents involved in Guilford County Schools' new athletics transfer procedure will be counted on to do the "honorable" thing, and it'll be up to the school system's athletics director, Leigh Hebbard, to determine when they don't.

  • Ex-Coach Won't Face Charges for Exposing Self to Team

    by Eli Francovich July 2017

    No criminal charges will be filed against a Spokane high school football coach accused of placing his penis inside a hot dog bun in front of players at a leadership camp last summer. The Shoshone County Prosecutor's Office declined to file charges on June 21. At least three football players claimed that while former Ferris High School football coach Jim Sharkey was grilling hot dogs and hamburgers at the camp along the Coeur d'Alene River near Cataldo, Idaho, he turned toward them with his exposed penis inside a hot dog bun. Sharkey's coaching contract was not renewed by Spokane Public Schools in late March. He had coached the Ferris Saxons since 2006 and won a state championship in 2010. In 2016, the team went 5-5.

  • Saban Sounds Alarm on Talk of Earlier Signing Day

    by Andy Berg July 2017

    Alabama football coach Nick Saban is concerned high school seniors might skip their final prep seasons to avoid injuries once they’ve signed with a college team.

    Just last week Saban was asked by CBS Sports for comment on the way Leonard Fournette and Christian McCaffrey’s bowed out of last year’s bowl games, presumably to avoid injury before entering the NFL draft. Saban said he’s worried about more of the same from high school players if the NCAA were to move up its signing day. 

    "Same thing will happen in high school if they make the signing day before the season," Saban said. "It will take a few years, then some kid will say, 'Hey, I'm going to Notre Dame. I'm not playing my senior year.'”

    Saban may not be completely off base in his concerns.

    This year’s recently approved early signing day will be held Dec. 20, 2017, for the 2018 recruiting class, which means players still need that final high school season to prove themselves. The existing date in early February will remain.

    The NCAA said that the new earlier signing date would allow those recruits who have their minds made up to commit earlier and thus not be hassled by recruiters as they’re completing their senior year.

    University of Wisconsin coach Paul Chryst said he thought the new date was a good thing for players and teams. "If you can sign them and that part would be done, it would be good,” Chryst told SBNation.com. “No one’s fighting the early signing in the discussions I’ve been a part of."

    SBNation pointed out that the earlier signings could have some drawbacks for players. Most coaching changes happen in December and January after some prospects will have signed early.

    Bob Bowlsby, commissioner of the Big 12 Conference, said he’s not a fan of having any specified signing day.

    “I'm not sure that a signing date is exactly what we need in today's environment,” Bowlsby said during a recent press conference, which was reported by SBNation. “I have asked coaches, athletic directors, conference commissioners repeatedly over the last 12 months why we have a signing date. It seems to me that, if we have 70 percent of the student-athletes, the prospects that want to commit relatively early, that one date is not all that important. The only answer I've ever gotten is ‘because we've always had a signing date.’”

    Bowlsby said he thinks players should be allowed to sign as early as spring. “I think you could end up with a signing window, where you would say, ‘OK, we're going to do visits in April, May and June, we're gonna go to camp,’” Bowlsby said.

    Check out Saban's comments on early signing dates from October of last year: 

  • Ex-Coach in Settlement Talks Over Age Discrimination

    by Jim Baumbach July 2017

    The age-discrimination lawsuit filed in March by longtime Garden City High School baseball coach Rich Smith is on hold while the two sides engage in settlement talks, according to a court filing.