RECENT ARTICLES
  • UNM Women's Basketball Cuts Prices to Lure Fans

    by KEN SICKENGER JOURNAL August 2014

    UNM is cutting season-ticket prices, eliminating parking fees in most lots and increasing fan access to players. These and other changes in game-day structure are intended to improve the fan experience and boost home attendance for women's basketball, which has steadily declined in recent years.

  • Iowa's Free-Tuition Student Ticket Promo Goes Awry

    by Michael Gaio August 2014

    Attracting students to college football games is a challenge for schools across the country. As AB reported last year, even the Alabamas of the world are having a tough time drawing students away from the tailgating scene and into the stadium. Last week, the University of Iowa launched a promotion to solve this problem.

  • Tech Upgrades Boost Sports Concessions Operations

    by Emily Attwood July 2014

    Improving the fan experience.
    Such has been the motive of nearly every major decision in sports venues as of late — premium seating and club areas, improved Wi-Fi connectivity, increasingly eye-catching LED video displays — it's all about creating an atmosphere that tops the comfort and convenience of watching a game at home in a way that no fan can resist.

  • Six Strategies for Selling Club Memberships

    by Rob Bishop and Barry Klein July 2014

    Let's take it as a given that most consumers assume that the process of buying a health club membership will be sales-intensive. Our entire industry has been painted as having high-pressure, lock-people-in-a-cubicle-until-they-sign methods, and consumers enter most clubs with their guard up, waiting for the hard sell.

  • Four Steps to Link Sponsorships to LEED Certification

    by Dr. Lana Huberty June 2014

    Athletic facility managers have made a commitment to green design, sustainability and reducing their facilities' overall environmental impact despite shrinking resources. Often, these environmental initiatives include a facility achieving LEED certification. In a time of limited funds, facility managers are exploring new ways to offset this investment. Along with traditional revenue streams such as ticketing and membership sales, some facility managers are utilizing sponsorship sales. Due to the relative newness of LEED certification in sports venues, there is little experience and shared knowledge on how to use LEED certification to entice sponsorships and generate revenue.

  • Photo: Purdue to Put Fan Photos on Football Helmets

    by Michael Gaio June 2014

    Trying to market a college football team coming off a 1-11 season can be a difficult challenge. But sometimes tough times can inspire the most creative solutions. Take this latest idea from the Purdue Boilermakers for example: The football team is running a promotion that will give fans the opportunity to have their mug plastered on the team's football helmet.

  • Overcoming Gym Membership Retention Challenges

    by Dennis Van Milligen May 2014

    The rise of lower-priced clubs have put greater pressure on gym owners to create an environment that keeps members happy while also empowering them to feel confident that their gym membership investment is well worth it. Ultimately, though, they may lose those members to lower-priced alternatives, writing off the member loss as simply a financial decision. The reality is that the warning signs were there; they just failed to see what was right in front of them.

  • Barclays Center to Add Environmentally Friendly Roof

    by April 2014

    In an effort to become a better neighbor to the Prospect Heights neighborhood in Brooklyn, N.Y., The Barclays Center, home of the NBA's Brooklyn Nets, is about to get greener — literally.

  • Blog: Are Event 'Swag Bags' Worth the Cost Anymore?

    by Mary Helen Sprecher April 2014

    I registered for a community fun run/walk not long ago and as I was walking away from the entry desk, I checked through my race packet. Race number? Check. Safety pins? Check. Flyers for multiple upcoming races? Check, check and check. 

    And then – paper. Lots of paper. Coupons, advertising circulars, take-out menus, subscription postcards for magazines and business cards for local establishments. As I was heading for the exit, I heard the person behind me complain, “This is all ads. Didn’t we used to get more stuff in these things?”

    Admittedly, we did. I can recall when things like socks, sweatbands, can koozies, pens, packets of energy gel, sunscreen and lip balm were routinely tucked into those bags. These days, not so much.

    And that’s not really surprising. Event organizers are scrambling for sponsors, and some sports events’ major sponsors have dropped out. And those who are able to keep their sponsors are often faced with the choice of having funds that potentially could defray the cost of the event – or gimmes to put in the swag bag. It’s not surprising that many organizers are opting for the former, rather than the latter.

    When you get right down to it, companies just aren’t buying as many inexpensive souvenirs to be used as giveaways. A colleague who works in promotional merchandise, noted that trends in merchandising have changed. Slap bracelets, key chains and so forth are not as popular as they once were. Why? Because companies know they’ll get tossed as soon as the recipient gets home. Items have to have inherent value in order to be useful as promo pieces these days. Companies tend to invest in putting their logo on more expensive merchandise (earbuds, thumb drives, etc.) and they save those for events to which they have made a sizeable sponsorship donation – and in which people have paid significant funds to register.

    Many times, organizations that sponsor events, particularly smaller events, do it in exchange for publicity, meaning having their coupons or other materials dropped into the swag bag. Those bananas and cereal bars at the finish line? The trade-off was the coupon or the take-out menu.

    Generally, people just go through the swag bag and pull the materials they want, and discard what they don’t. And as long as they put their trash in the can (and not on the ground), organizers have done their part.

    Sometimes, though, companies really want to give out freebies, but the choices on a bare-bones budget are limited.  I think my head-scratching moment came when I went through a race packet and came across a postage-stamp-size piece of fabric (honestly, no bigger than 1” x 1” square) that was marketed as a way to vanquish fingerprints from the screen of a smartphone. Nice, but – where to store something like that? And while I appreciate the gesture, I can’t say the item made it home with me.

    In this day and age of sustainability and cost-cutting, goodie bags are an endangered species. Increasingly, people are coming home from smaller events empty-handed. And maybe that’s a good thing. 

     

  • Social Media Revolutionizes Campus Rec Marketing

    by Paul Steinbach April 2014

    As the literature on the bulletin board went unnoticed, Chris Butler could see the writing on the wall.