RECENT ARTICLES
  • Air Force Reservist Dies After Collapse in Fitness Test

    by aparas@postandcourier.com July 2014

    A 26-year-old reservist died Saturday after he collapsed at Joint Base Charleston during his Air Force physical fitness test.

  • Military Base Sports Venue Undergoes Security Exercise

    by FORT MEADE PAO Correspondent July 2014

    It took just seconds for "armed terrorists" to storm Murphy Field House and take control of the facility and the dozens of patrons inside. But through partnerships with a plethora of local emergency services and law enforcement agencies, the installation defused the staged hostage-taking scenario on June 17. The "crisis" was part of the garrison's annual full-scale training exercise, which tests Fort George G. Meade's response force in the event of a real-life attack.

  • Base Recognized for Outstanding Airman Fitness Efforts

    by Staff report June 2014

    Dyess Air Force Base recently received recognition by Air Combat Command for the best Comprehensive Airman Fitness practices for the fourth quarter of 2013.

  • Village Board Okays Veterans-Owned Fitness Center

    by ED COLLINS. For Sun-Times Media | @EdCollins2 June 2014

    Vigilant Elite Training, also known as VET, received a special use permit from the Gurnee Village Board to establish an indoor multi-purpose fitness training facility. VET, is 100 percent veteran owned and operated, and will offer two fitness programs with separate hours of operation at the Grand Tri-State Business Park, 905 Lakeside Drive.

  • A Call to Action for the Aquatics Industry

    by Eric Herman June 2014

    Last week I couldn’t help but notice this year’s Memorial Day observance took place just days after the breaking news about the falsified records scandal at VA hospitals. In a world filled with brutal ironies, that one was a doozy! 

    Naturally, the timing led to all sorts of political finger-pointing and moral handwringing about how we’re failing in our duty to assist our wounded service people. Although that simple observation is something most people probably believe in, it’s equally apparent that without action, even the most well- intended rhetoric does little, if any good at all. 

    As is true for many, Memorial Day is a really big deal for my family. My dad is an Air Force Vietnam vet; my stepfather a Word War II Navy vet; and my grandfather served as a Marine in both WWII and Korea. As my thoughts were with these heroes — all of who remain healthfully extant — and their brothers and sisters in arms who haven’t been so fortunate, I realized that the aquatics industry is perfectly positioned to offer assistance in this current crisis of care.

    RELATED: Military Veterans Find Success in Fitness Industry

    For many wounded warriors, aquatic therapy stands as one of the most effective means of treating both physical and mental injuries. Community aquatic centers, YMCAs, university facilities and others should take the lead in making free access to such facilities for veterans a top priority. And better still, wouldn’t it be great if such facilities programmed use with war-injured veterans in mind? That could be as simple as reserving a couple swim lanes exclusively for vets during certain times, or as involved as bringing in therapists to volunteer their time and services. Facility owners and managers might even consider reaching out to VA hospitals and clinics as partners to make aquatic exercise more readily available to those vets who need it most. 

    On a purely self-serving level, I can’t think of a more noble or effective way to promote the profound health benefits of water-based rehabilitation. The fact is, catering to our active and retired servicemen and women would be spectacular PR. It’s exactly the kind of exposure our industry needs. Beyond that interest, however, is the reality that opening doors to vets could do genuine good for those who are unfortunately being underserved by the institutions designed to help them. 

    Keep in mind that our most recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have demonstrated how modern medical science can keep severely wounded soldiers alive. Ultimately those advances in lifesaving procedures and technology put more burden and responsibility on society at large to take care of these brave souls as they move forward in their post-military lives or seek to re-enter active duty. 

    In saying all this, I realize there are already many facilities moving in this direction, and the call to action is being heard across the aquatics industry. In preparing this discussion, I found the following passage in an article on the website for the Aquatic Exercise Association by Will Corley, an undergraduate in the Exercise Physiology program at West Virginia University: 

    Many different injuries are seen in returning veterans of modern warfare. Since the invasion of Iraq and Afghanistan, 50,420 United States service members have been wounded in action. Injuries range from chronic lower back pain to multiple limb amputations due to the large forces of present day weapons. Cognitive impairments, such as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), can make a veteran’s return difficult as well. These injuries and mental disorders can be managed using aquatic therapy and exercise programs… but are there enough nationwide?

    READ MORE: Water Warriors

    For those owners and managers who might not have given the idea any thought, however, maybe the time is nigh. 

    For those of us who aren’t in a position to institute such programs, we can always use our voices to support the idea of opening up aquatic centers to vets, free of charge. You might also consider hosting a fundraiser or donating to the Wounded Warrior Project, which is doing important work helping our wounded service personnel integrate into society. 

    There is always some way you can help. 

    There is no one-size-fits-all solution when it comes to meeting wounded vet needs. Given the flexibility and power of aquatic therapy, however, our industry is arguably well positioned to offer an important and helpful part of the answer. 


    Eric Herman is senior editor of AB's sister publication AQUA magazine.

     

  • Military Stepping Up Fitness Initiatives to Become Wellness Leader

    by Emily Attwood March 2014

    The Armed Forces have long been seen as the epitome of fitness, trailblazing the way for new and evermore impressive exercise programs. Look no further than TRX and other suspension-training offshoots, bootcamp-style workouts and military-inspired obstacle runs, to name a few examples.

  • 'Bloody' Northwestern WWP Unis: Honoring or Insulting?

    by Michael Gaio November 2013

    Northwestern's football team will wear special uniforms for its game against Michigan later this month. The patriotic red, white and blue design is meant to raise awareness for the Wounded Warrior Project, a nonprofit that works to empower injured veterans. The game-worn jerseys will then be auctioned off with 100 percent of the proceeds benefitting the charity.

  • Army Testing Tracking Technology

    by John Agoglia October 2013

    Faced with a less fit force than ever before, the Army is rolling out new initiatives and offering wearable technology to help soldiers and their families live healthier lifestyles.

  • MMA and Combat Training Makes for Fitter Military

    by John Agoglia October 2013

    More soldiers are utilizing the principles of MMA and combat training to improve their performance on the physical fitness test and the battlefield.

  • Programming for New Mothers Can Help Military Fitness Centers

    by John Agoglia October 2013

    All new mothers face stress. But military mothers who must be in top physical shape just six months later face even more stress. Here's how fitness centers can help.