RECENT ARTICLES
  • Buffalo-Shaped Pool Draws Variety of Colorado Students

    by Paul Steinbach August 2014

    A small component of the University of Colorado Boulder Student Recreation Center's 300,000-square-foot renovation and expansion produced some fairly substantial debate.

  • New Park Near Vikings Stadium in Jeopardy

    by Andrew Brandt August 2014

    Plans for "The Yard," an open public park that would sit adjacent to the Vikings' new $1 billion dollar stadium, are in peril.

  • Tennis Court Surfaces Continue to Evolve

    by Mary Helen Sprecher July 2014

    No question, the sport of tennis has evolved. Players — like the colors they wear — are louder, bolder and more attention-grabbing than their predecessors. And the courts they play on have dragged the sport (some laughingly say kicking and screaming) into the 21st century. Courts have evolved since the days of green grass facilities and white chalk lines. Not that those don't still exist, but they're the exception, rather than the rule — particularly when it comes to recreational installations.

  • How LED Lighting Is Reaching All Levels of Outdoor Sports

    by Paul Steinbach June 2014

    The future for high-intensity discharge bulbs as an instrument of sports illumination grows dimmer by the day.

  • Screws Found in Park Slides Put Kids in Danger

    by Michael Gaio June 2014

    A routine trip to the park turned into a potentially dangerous situation for kids in the Chicago suburb of Oak Lawn on Wednesday.

  • Athletic Business Architectural Showcase 2014 Map

    by AB Staff June 2014

    View 2014 AB showcase locations in a full screen map

    This year marks the 27th year of Athletic Business's Architectural Showcase and 29th Facility of Merit awards program. The University of Tennessee's Neyland Stadium graced the cover of the first "Showcase on Architecture" as it was initially called, one of 45 facilities to be highlighted in the June 1988 issue.

    Not surprisingly, facilities have gotten bigger and more expensive since our first Showcase — there is a more than $100 million difference between the most expensive project this year and its counterpart in 1988 — but there's still room for smaller projects. College projects continue to dominate the market, though preferences have changed — a campus-rec standard today, climbing walls were all but nonexistent in facilities of the '80s.

  • Blog: Six Facilities That Left Me Floored

    by Michael Gaio May 2014

    When I was invited by Regupol America to tour several athletic and fitness facilities earlier this month, I had no idea what I was in for. Working for AB, we know how important the right kind of flooring is — it impacts everything from acoustics and aesthetics to cost and usability — but it takes getting out of the office and seeing the details up close to really understand how flooring can make an impact.

  • LED Technology Poised to Revolutionize Outdoor Sports Lighting

    by Paul Steinbach May 2014

    As the idiom suggests, the difference between night and day is dramatic — particularly when viewed from a literal illumination standpoint. High noon on a sunny day will introduce 8,000 foot-candles of light to the earth. By comparison, a moonlit night — one bright enough to read a newspaper by — produces three one-hundredths of one foot-candle. Thus, turning night into something resembling day for sports participants, fans and live television audiences is not a task to be taken lightly.

  • Six Events that Forever Altered Athletic Venue Security

    by April 2014

    With Tuesday marking the one-year anniversary of the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing, Athletic Business looks back at how the sports world has changed over the past few decades in response to new security threats.

  • Successful Project Design Borne of Strong Relationships

    by Ralph Agostinelli April 2014

    School and sports administrators embarking on their first-ever capital project are sometimes surprised to learn how much architecture firms resemble other types of corporations. From the moment the architect steps in front of the building committee, making a pitch while brandishing renderings in watercolor, the image is of the architect as artist, driving this misreading of design firms.