RECENT ARTICLES
  • Opinion: Youth Specialization Killing the 'Great Athlete'

    by Milo F. Bryant, Special to The Gazette March 2015

    Early specialization among our young sports enthusiasts is bordering on an epidemic. Call it the systematic killing of the great athlete. And we are the culprits.

  • Opinion: Stallings, Vandy Take Step in Right Direction

    by Knoxville News-Sentinel (Tennessee) March 2015

    For part of Saturday afternoon, you couldn’t help but wonder who the guy was in the Kevin Stallings mask standing in front of the Vanderbilt bench.

  • Retired Recreation Manager Recalls Joys of the Job

    by Maryann Vasquez February 2015

    I struggle to find topics for this column that are both interesting and meaningful — not only to me, but to this community. When inspiration hits, I listen.

  • A Coach's Take: Youth Athletes' Bad Rap is Undeserved

    by Kari Woodall, Guest Contributor February 2015

    All too often, I read comments and articles about the growing shift in the mindset of youth athletes. They are continuously labeled as entitled and unaccountable versus hard-working and responsible.

  • D-I Basketball Coaches Unite for 'Autism Speaks'

    by Ken Sugiura; Staff February 2015

    About 225 Division I coaches, including every ACC coach, will wear the blue puzzle-piece pins associated with Autism Speaks, the autism science and advocacy organization.

  • Penn State AD Condemns '409' Decals, Then Apologizes

    by Michael Gaio January 2015

    On Friday, the NCAA agreed to restructure the sanctions on Penn State University and restore 111 victories it had stripped from Joe Paterno's record in the wake of the Jerry Sandusky child sex-abuse scandal.

  • Reports: Michigan AD Dave Brandon Set to Resign

    by Michael Gaio October 2014

    It's been rumored for weeks and now it looks like it's actually going to happen.

  • HS Adds Incentives to Revive the Multisport Athlete

    by Michael Gaio September 2014

    The multisport athlete is a rare breed these days. In fact, in his September column, our own editor in chief, Dennis Van Milligen, proclaimed the multisport athlete was dead altogether.

    "This was back when your best athletes played multiple sports — an era that appears to be ending, as sport specialization dominates the modern high school scene," he wrote.

  • Blog: Brand Recognition

    by Emily Attwood September 2014

    Branding. I grew up in Wyoming where branding means something totally different than its current emphasis in college athletics. Or maybe not. 

    Recently I was in a bar in Meeteetsee, Wyoming. In the restroom, on a rough-sawn wood wall, (I can hear the urbanites collectively saying "Iccch") someone had painstakingly recreated cattle brands in pen. Some were very simple and self-explanatory, others more complex, requiring thought and interpretation. The "lazy A" or "bar UE" are easy; the "H lazy B rockin' T" requires a bit more study. 

    Not so much for Athletics branding. It is everywhere -- on people's clothes, on their cars, in their homes, and especially at their alma maters. Some brands are easy, like the buffaloes. Or wait, is it bison? Attaching the university's monogram to the brand or emphasizing school colors often clarifies any confusion, and surprisingly most brands seem pretty identifiable.

    Seemingly, transferring the brand to facility design should be easy. And it can be. But I like it when it's not blatantly obvious. I also like the fact that collegiate mascots endure, but the brands change. A school's history of brands can be fascinating. And these days, brands evolve almost constantly--hence the popularity of flat screen TVs or massive video boards as an architectural statement. The image is constantly refreshed. Reinvention and adaptation is essential, otherwise the experience for a spectator or recruit might be stale. 

    I don't mind the overpowering visual stimulation prevalent in college athletics, but sometimes I yearn for simpler times, when branding was simple, fun to interpret and timeless. 

  • Leadership Tips from Fast Company's Bill Taylor

    by Paul Steinbach September 2014

    As a twenty-something editor at the Harvard Business Review in the early 1990s, Bill Taylor sensed a pending revolution. Baby boomers were gaining power.