Reviews of Managing Sports Organizations: Responsibility for Performance; FASTHockey.com; and Taking Shots: Tall Tales, Bizarre Battles and the Incredible Truth about the NBA

Take Responsibility
In this second edition of Managing Sports Organizations: Responsibility for Performance (Butterworth-Heinemann, $49.95, softcover), four Western New England College professors examine management principles, concepts and issues from the perspective of how to improve overall performance. Each chapter focuses on a specific segment - high school and youth sports, college sports, professional sports, even health and fitness programs - and effectively weaves industry issues with fundamental management theories and practices. Multiple tables and figures, profiles of successful organizations and individuals, and real-world applications add depth to the text, which also includes special sections about human resources and information technology management, globalization, ethics, and the sporting goods, apparel and footwear industries.


Ice Breaker
A handful of retired National Hockey League players have pooled their experiences to launch FASTHockey (fasthockey.com) - a resource for amateur hockey and player recruiting. Players create free profiles providing their age, height, weight, game statistics, academic performance, references, contact information and even video footage, which are then viewed by coaches, recruiters and agents who pay to use the site. FASTHockey also works as a social network, putting players in touch with each other and, FASTHockey officials say, features the most amateur hockey scores, schedules, stats and video on the Internet. Former pros involved with the venture include two-time Stanley Cup winner Scott Young, 15-year veteran Marty McInnis, and U.S. Olympians David Jensen and Ted Crowley.
www.fasthockey.com

Who Loves This Game?
What better time than the NBA Finals to shatter the feel-good myths of professional basketball? That's exactly what NBA agent Keith Glass does in Taking Shots: Tall Tales, Bizarre Battles and the Incredible Truth about the NBA (HarperCollins, $24.95, hardcover). The man whose clients have included a center who hated basketball and a Muslim player who refused to stand during the national anthem writes with the wit and insight of a 25-year league veteran. Glass dishes about the NBA's lack of control and discipline, the 2004 U.S. Olympic basketball team, and why he can no longer sit through a complete game without getting bored. He also explains why agents are necessary and writes about being portrayed by Elliot Gould on "Saturday Night Live."