RECENT ARTICLES
  • City Plans $1.4M Renovation of Rec Center Built in 1967

    by CHRISTOPHER O'DONNELL July 2014

    - One of the city's oldest recreation centers is set for a $1.4 million makeover. City officials plan to renovate the Lake Vista Recreation Center in South St. Petersburg, building a 4,000-square-foot addition and modernizing the aging building. Plans include a multipurpose community room and kitchen, demolition and replacement of the center's entrance and lobby, new restrooms and replacement of windows, ceilings and lighting.

  • New Projects: University of Colorado; Guilford High School; Fairfield University

    by Emily Attwood July 2014

    Breaking Ground

    The University of Colorado (right) broke ground last month on $143 million in various athletic facility upgrades.

  • During Construction It’s Decision Time, Again and Again

    by Ralph Agostinelli June 2014

    The design is complete, the shovels are in the ground. How are you planning to spend the next 12 to 18 months, while your new building takes shape?

  • Ten Tips for Keeping Your Rec Center Looking Like New

    by Erik Kocher and Diane Guse Dahlmann June 2014

    After the long years of planning and construction, and shortly after the excitement of the grand opening, your brand new recreation facility will begin to age. This is a hard fact of life in the business of building and/or renovating popular places. That first cracked tile or tiny chip on the counter by the entrance is like the first scratch on a brand new car. It's only a matter of time before it happens.

  • AB's Architectural Showcase a Yearlong Affair

    by Emily Attwood June 2014

    The Architectural Showcase in June is the one issue of Athletic Business I look forward to most each year. It's also the issue I spend most of each year working on.

  • What You Bring to the Facility Planning Process

    by Jerry Burke June 2014

    Beware the architect who has all the answers, or the client who has none.

  • Athletic Business Architectural Showcase 2014 Map

    by AB Staff June 2014

    View 2014 AB showcase locations in a full screen map

    This year marks the 27th year of Athletic Business's Architectural Showcase and 29th Facility of Merit awards program. The University of Tennessee's Neyland Stadium graced the cover of the first "Showcase on Architecture" as it was initially called, one of 45 facilities to be highlighted in the June 1988 issue.

    Not surprisingly, facilities have gotten bigger and more expensive since our first Showcase — there is a more than $100 million difference between the most expensive project this year and its counterpart in 1988 — but there's still room for smaller projects. College projects continue to dominate the market, though preferences have changed — a campus-rec standard today, climbing walls were all but nonexistent in facilities of the '80s.

  • The Keys to a Smooth Construction Approval Process

    by Ralph Agostinelli May 2014

    A gymnasium is a big building. If you're constructing a gym in or next to a residential area, you need to make sure it fits into the fabric of the neighborhood.

  • Plastic Bottle Initiative Helping to Green Athletic Facilities

    by Emily Attwood May 2014

    For years, Americans have been encouraged to decrease our consumption of bottled water and use reusable beverage containers, cutting down on the number of plastic bottles that end up in landfills. Despite the efforts of various sustainability campaigns, the Beverage Marketing Corporation reported that bottled water consumption reached an all-time high in 2012 when Americans consumed 9.7 million gallons of water, 65 percent of that in the form of single-use disposable bottles.

  • Storage Space Crucial to Any Rec or Fitness Facility

    by Jerry Burke May 2014

    “Not enough storage” is a frequent lament of recreation center operators. I feel for them. I’ve watched countless owners embark on new construction projects determined to avoid this situation, only to go down the same road as their peers. What happens is, you hit the limit on the amount of space you think you can build under their budget. The owners then look at the plan and try to expand their usable program space by cutting back on their storage space, rather than add to the footprint to keep their desired amount of program space and maintain their corresponding storage needs.