• Kids' Triathlon Pool Fails Inspection, Used Anyway

    by Emily Attwood May 2015

    Thousands of children participated in a triathlon this past weekend in Jacksonville, Fla., despite reports that the pool used had failed a health inspection earlier in the week. But that’s okay, event and city officials say.

    As part of the two-day conversion of EverBank Field to host swimming, biking and running for the 7th Annual First Coast Kids Triathlon, a portable pool was constructed on the site. The event was a success, despite reports that swimmers had to be pulled from the pool by lifeguards due to the absence of pool ladders. 

    Because the pool was temporary, city officials say it was not considered a public pool under the state’s Department of Health, and thus was not subject to the same inspection criteria. In particular, the water used for such pools is pumped in and out and not recalculated. 

    “They actually don't have guidelines to monitor portable pools, so we actually work with them to set up a structure that allows us to circulate the water and make sure that it's safe,” event director Tom Gildersleeve told

    Furthermore, while the status of portable pools for city inspection purposes is still a little murky, the event still had to fulfill the guidelines set forth by USA Triathlon. 

    “Our events are all sanctioned by USA Triathlon, which is the governing board underneath the U.S. Olympic Committee so there's a safety protocol we follow,” Gildersleeve said.

    Such pools have been used at other kids triathlon events. Lifeguards were also on hand both in and out of the pool to monitor participants’ safety. 


  • The AB Extra: April 17

    by Laura Godlewski April 2015

    The April 17th edition of The AB Extra, the inspiring, quirky or downright weird stories you may have missed this week.

  • Man Continued to Coach Youth Softball Despite Arrest

    by Laura Godlewski April 2015

    Parents in a Georgia county are upset and concerned after they learned a local softball coach was able to coach a team even though the man had been arrested on child pornography charges. 

    Anthony Bartlett was arrested two years ago after investigators discovered child pornography on his laptop, but has been out on bail since then. 

  • The AB Extra: April 10

    by Laura Godlewski April 2015

    This week's AB Extra includes updates on two prominent professional stadiums, a warning for anyone thinking of attending The Masters and a new potential programming idea for your facility. But we begin with a new youth football league aimed at fixing the "broken" culture in sports. New to The Extra? Here's last week's edition.

  • Funding Freeze Puts Illinois Park Districts in a Bind

    by Laura Godlewski, Athletic Business Intern March 2015

    With the state of Illinois facing a $1.6 billion budget deficit, governor Bruce Rauner has placed an indefinite suspension on state grants for park district construction, which affects both current construction and new construction for park districts across the state. 

    This decision comes at a particularly poor time for many park districts just gearing up to start work on a variety of construction projects as warm spring weather sets in.

  • Seven Questions to Ask When Staging a Sports Camp

    by Paul Steinbach March 2015

    For insight into the staging of sports camps, Athletic Business looked no further than a couple of companies that do nothing but sports camps — and on a grand scale — in a marketplace in which seemingly everybody and his or her former-college-athlete cousin has launched one.

  • Anti-Bullying Policy Coming to Nashville Parks?

    by Michael Gaio February 2015

    In an effort to align with the city's public school district, Nashville's Metro Parks and Recreation has proposed an anti-bullying policy of its own.

  • Hockey League’s No-Touch Policy Touches Off Debate

    by Emily Attwood February 2015

    A Toronto girls’ hockey league has drawn some attention this month, not because of its performance on the ice, but its policies related to player-coach interactions. 

    Following a complaint regarding a volunteer coach who congratulated a player by slapping her on the butt and squeezing her shoulders, the Toronto Leaside Girls Hockey Association’s executive vice-president sent out an email to coaches with the following message: “Putting hands on shoulders, slapping butts, tapping them on the helmet, NOTHING, this can make some of the girls uncomfortable and you won’t know which ones, so no contact, period.”

    Following criticism from parents and a flurry of online commentary, the league issued a statement clarifying the league’s policy, stating that the email was only intended to remind coaches of the league’s existing policy, not replace it:

    “The issue about physical contact is a guideline only. Please know that we naturally understand that contact is part of the game. We also acknowledge that it is normal for volunteers to touch players in certain circumstances – e.g. helping with skates and helmets; assisting a young player on and off the bench; helping an injured player off the ice. The suggestion in the news media is that we have implemented a no contact policy. Please be assured that this is not the case.”

    League president Jennifer Smith went on to explain, "At no time did the TLGHA invoke a new policy. The section of the email about physical contact with players did not draw a clear enough distinction between hard and fast rules and guidelines. These are guidelines only."

    RELATED: No-Score Youth Sports Policies Gaining Popularity

    Still, the zero-tolerance position of the email touched off what many players and coaches feel is an important discussion about the roll of physical contact between players and coaches in sports. Reactions were mixed, with some feeling a no-contact policy went to far and others that it only made sense to discourage unnecessary contact between players and coaches. 

    “Obviously we’ve been taking steps ever since we’ve known that some bad things have happened to kids back in the ‘60s and ‘70s,” Twenty-year hockey coach David Trombley told CTV Toronto. “Definitely we’re out here to protect the kids.”

    “I think it’s a real shame in a public situation on the bench that they’re not allowed to give a congratulatory tap,” said one parent. “I absolutely understand behind closed doors and in the locker room, but maybe on the bench and on the ice, it’s a different situation.”

    For Dave Cmar, president of Sun Parlour Female Hockey Association in Ontario, it’s a logistics issue. 

    “We wouldn’t have the resources to be at every arena, at every game,” he told The Windsor Star. “The difficulty would be in uniformly applying that.”

    Sports psychologist Kate Hays defended coach-player contact as an important aspect of player development, telling CBCNews, “It says, 'I'm paying attention to you, you've done a good job, I know you are really engaged, you are important to me, you are important to the team.'" 

    Perhaps more important, Hays says that it’s part of teaching children the difference between appropriate and inappropriate contact. "The idea of learning about non-sexualized, non-aggressive touch is something that indicates a positive connection among human beings.” 

    Should touching a player's shoulder be considered inappropriate contact for a coach?
    • Votes: (0%)
    • Votes: (0%)
    • Votes: (0%)
    Total Votes:
    First Vote:
    Last Vote:

  • Little League Champs Stripped of National Title

    by Emily Attwood February 2015

    Nearly two months after allegations that the Jackie Robinson West team violated residency rules, the governing board of Little League Baseball has stripped the team of its 2014 U.S. championship title. The team drew significant attention during this past year’s Little League season as the first team comprised of all African-American participants to win the national title.

    In December, a rival team accused the Chicago-based team of using players outside its geographic area in December, allegations that were initially dismissed. But an investigation by the Little League organization revealed that the team used a map with falsified boundaries to recruit players from neighboring districts. As a result of the investigation, the team will vacate its wins from the 2014 Little League Baseball International Tournament, including its regional and national titles, the latter of which will be awarded to Mountain Ridge Little League of Las Vegas. 

    “For more than 75 years, Little League has been an organization where fair play is valued over the importance of wins and losses,” Little League International CEO Stephen D. Keener said in a statement. “This is a heartbreaking decision. What these players accomplished on the field and the memories and lessons they have learned during the Little League World Series tournament is something the kids can be proud of, but it is unfortunate that the actions of adults have led to this outcome.”

    Local officials acknowledged in January that they knew of the team’s violations but had not reported them to the governing body, sparking the league to reopen its investigation. The team’s manager has since been suspended, and the league’s administrator for the district has been removed from his position. 

    “Little League takes these matters very seriously and has spent countless hours gathering information about the many issues facing Jackie Robinson West Little League and Illinois District 4,” Keener said. “During our review, it became clear that both Jackie Robinson West officials and District Administrator, Mike Kelly signed documents to make players eligible who should not have been.”


  • 2014 Excellence in Youth Sports Award Winner: Suffolk (Va.) Parks and Recreation

    by NAYS Staff November 2014

    Suffolk (Va.) Parks and Recreation is a place for children to learn fundamental sports skills, enhance communication skills, build social relationships and just have fun – all through youth sports.