RECENT ARTICLES
  • High School Coach Fired After Pop Gun Hazing Incident

    by Michael Gaio August 2014

    What was supposed to be a night of fun and team-building has instead cost a Minnesota high school dance coach her job and divided supporters of the team in the process. The Cannon Falls school board voted Monday not to renew the contract of Madi Salisbury, the head coach of the Bomber Dance Team, due to a July 25 incident at the school's auditorium.

  • KHSAA Recommends Softball Players Wear Facemasks

    by Rexford Sheild, Athletic Business Intern July 2014

    As safety has become a bigger priority at every level of sports, the state of Kentucky is considering taking things even further for its high school softball players. The Kentucky High School Athletic Association (KHSAA) voted to recommend that softball players playing first base, third base and pitcher wear protective face gear during games.

  • Boy’s Drowning Sparks Call for Age Restriction Changes

    by Emily Attwood June 2014

    How young is too young to be swimming alone at a public pool? That is the question being asked in Cincinnati following the drowning of a 10-year-old boy last week. The boy was unresponsive when lifeguards pulled him from the pool at Bush Recreation Center and began emergency response procedures. He was transported to a local hospital, where he died over the weekend. 

  • USC to Offer Four-Year Scholarships in Revenue Sports

    by Michael Gaio June 2014

    The University of Southern California is joining a short list of Division I schools offering student-athletes an added sense of security with its scholarship offers.

  • N.C. High Schools Hope to Meet Title IX Standards with Stunt

    by Andrew Brandt June 2014

    In 2010, the Office of Civil Rights deemed that both traditional and competitive cheerleading did not meet the requirements of Title IX to be considered sports.

    The sport called stunt, a cross between gymnastics and competitive cheerleading, has been constructed to meet those standards.

    Related: Cheer Evolving, But Will NCAA Call It an Emerging Sport?

    According to The State, stunt will begin making waves across Wake County, N.C. high schools next spring. The sport will consist of both regular head-to-head matches and competitions, which will be divided into four parts: partner stunts, pyramids and tosses, group jumps and tumbling and team performance.

    By beginning in the spring, stunt won’t have to jockey for gym time with existing sports like basketball and volleyball. And like diving, stunt scores will be determined by mastery. Rather than create new moves, participants are required to perfect particular routines.

    Wake County will be the first in the state to offer stunt as a competitive sport, and their hope that it introduces more girls to interscholastic athletics is a promising one. “There is a tremendous amount of interest in it,” said Darren Coe, the Wake County Schools senior administrator for athletics.

    Related: AMA: Cheerleading as Rigorous, Risky as Any Sport

    Previously, Wake County didn’t have a high enough percentage of girls competing to meet Title IX standards. And the North Carolina High School Athletic Association currently hosts championships in 11 sports for boys—and only 10 for girls.

    If stunt raises enough interest, however, it could very well become sport number 11 for girls. Here’s to hoping stunt becomes something greater than its name suggests.

     

  • AD, Coaches Fired in High School Recruiting Scandal

    by Michael Gaio June 2014

    An ugly scandal in the Dallas Independent School District is coming to a close with the firings of the district's athletic director, two top basketball coaches and 12 others.

  • Northwestern Football Players Cast Historic Union Vote

    by Michael Gaio April 2014

    Northwestern football players cast their votes to determine if they will unionize Friday morning. The vote by about 70 scholarship players will be watched closely by colleges and universities across the country due to the impact it could have on the dynamics of college athletics. However, the outcome of the vote may not be known for some time.

  • Mavs' PA Announcer Blasts Refs on Twitter, Gets Benched

    by Michael Gaio April 2014

    Dallas Mavericks public address announcer Sean Heath has been suspended for two games by the NBA after a series of tweets criticizing the league.

  • After 133 Closures in 2013, City Steps Up Pool Testing

    by April 2014

    When many people go to the local pool for a swim, they don’t think twice about the delicate chemical balance required for the water to be safe for swimmers — they assume there are people responsible for checking that — and they’d be right. 

    But according to the Lincoln, Neb., Journal Star, city inspectors worry those tasked with checking the pool's chlorine and pH levels may not be doing so correctly.

    In 2013, Lincoln closed 133 pools after inspections revealed that the water did not meet quality standards — which may indicate that water testers are making errors during testing.

    Under current regulations, lifeguards at a pool can handle pool tests with little training in the correct testing processes.

    Pool water is tested by adding a chemical to a small sample of pool water and stirring the sample to turn the water pink. Then another chemical is added to return the water to its original color.

    “It’s like a chemistry test,” Scott Holmes, Environmental Public Health Division manager for the local department, told the Journal Star. “You have to add the correct number of drops. You have to swirl and not shake.”

    Under proposed changes to the outdated pool-testing rules, only certified pool operators or pool testers would be allowed to do quality checks. In order to become certified, candidates would be required to take a short class and be tested to make sure they know how to test the water. The certification class would cost $20 dollars and would make a tester certified for two years.

    Testing water correctly plays a large role in helping maintain healthy pool users. When the water has the right pH and chlorine balance, it can reduce the transfer of certain types of diseases and infections.

    In 2001, Lincoln suffered an outbreak of cryptosporidium, a diarrheal illness, after it is estimated that it originally spread through public swimming pools. At its peak, there were more than 133 cases of cryptosporidium that had been acquired through public swimming pools. 

  • NJ High Schools Preparing for New Safety Mandates

    by Michael Gaio April 2014

    New Jersey high schools will soon have new rules in place aimed at keeping student-athletes safer.