RECENT ARTICLES
  • Update: Plan to Discontinue 'Redskins' on Hold at HS

    by Michael Popke — AB Managing Editor June 2013

    Teton High School in Driggs, Idaho, may not be dropping its "Redskins" mascot and logo after all. The Idaho State Journal reports that superintendent Monte Woolstenhulme - who announced his decision last week, citing his desire to teach students a kind of respect that goes beyond "the heritage behind the mascot" - has now decided to seek input from the public and the Native American community.

  • No-Score Youth Sports Policies Gaining Popularity

    by Emily Attwood May 2013

    This summer, a growing number of youth soccer teams in Ontario will be playing games without keeping track of goals scored, at least not officially.

  • Eighth-Grade Basketball Player's Hair a Federal Court Case

    by John T. Wolohan May 2013

    As a general rule, the courts will not get involved in the internal decision-making process of pri-vate athletic associations.

  • Boys Playing on Girls' Teams Under Fire in Pennsylvania

    by Michael Popke — AB Managing Editor May 2013

    A nearly 40-year-old court ruling that allowed boys to play on girls' high school sports teams in the '70s is at the center of a new legal battle in Pennsylvania. The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reports that concerns about girls potentially losing athletic opportunities and being subject to increased risk of injury has prompted the Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association to ask for the law to be changed.

  • Brewers Slamming the Door on Fans' Personal Potties

    by Paul Steinbach April 2013

    It's Opening Day at Milwaukee's Miller Park, and parking lots will soon be packed with tailgate parties. And where there are partygoers, there will be potty-goers. Lots of them.

  • More States Adopt Heat Management, Acclimatization Policies

    by Michael Popke — AB Managing Editor March 2013

    Snow may still be on the ground in some parts of the country, but at least two northern states have adopted heat-management policies for high school student-athletes during the past week.

  • Update: NFL Passes Controversial Rule on Helmet Hits

    by Michael Popke — AB Managing Editor March 2013

    The biggest news to come out of the National Football League's annual owners' meetings this week in Phoenix was the decision to ban ball carriers and defenders from delivering forcible blows with the crown of their helmets in the open field - a significant step toward making the game safer.

  • The 'Baseball Rule' - Not the Rule in Idaho

    by Carla Varriale March 2013

    A sweeping decision by a unanimous Idaho Supreme Court has called into question the future of the well-known "baseball rule," which for generations has insulated stadium owners and operators from liability for claims by spectators injured by errant bats and balls. In its ruling for plaintiff Bud Rountree, the court also held that primary or secondary assumption of the risk is not a defense except in a situation involving express written or oral consent, signaling that the baseball rule may be giving way to a duty of care based on traditional negligence principles.

  • Md. Bill Sparks Conversation About Lacrosse Safety

    by Emily Attwood March 2013

    While a Maryland bill requiring girls' lacrosse players to wear headgear was met with an outcry of opposition from the lacrosse community and quickly withdrawn, its authors say it has served its purpose. As participation in girls' lacrosse has increased, so have concerns about player safety, most notably, the risk of concussion. (Currently, helmets and facemasks are mandated in men's lacrosse, while helmets are banned in women's lacrosse for all but goalkeepers.) Delegates Dana Stein and Jon Cardin say that the proposed bill "accomplished an important goal of pushing the conversation to include vital safety concerns and is a win-win for parents and youth athletes."

  • 'Harlem Shake' Not Viral Fun for Every Sports Team

    by Michael Popke — AB Managing Editor February 2013

    The U.S. Olympic swimming team became America's darlings even before the first event at London's Aquatic Centre last summer, thanks to its lip dub video of the smash hit "Call Me Maybe." But a different kind of viral video is now threatening to have much more dire consequences for sports teams.