RECENT ARTICLES
  • Fighting in Ice Hockey Faces Unprecedented Scrutiny

    by Paul Steinbach April 2012

    Derek Boogaard's brain is handled with care these days. It resides with dozens of others at Boston University, donated to the Sports Legacy Institute so that it might be studied for signs of long-term damage.

  • Exercise Intervention Policies in Campus Fitness Centers

    by Emily Attwood March 2012

    Today's generation of incoming college freshmen expect a college to deliver the full package - not just a good education, but the latest technology, luxurious dorms, state-of-the art buildings, an elite athletic program and of course, an extensive offering of recreational activities to keep them busy outside of class.

  • Shaving Incident Costs Girls' Swim Team Its Title

    by Emily Attwood February 2012

    From the "You Never Thought This Rule Would be Enforced" file, a violation by a member of the Broadneck (Md.) High School girls' swim team retroactively cost the team its county title and prevented the coach from watching the squad sweep regional titles last weekend. The infraction? Shaving at the meet.

  • 2012 Olympics Chief: Gambling Bigger Threat Than Doping

    by Emily Attwood January 2012

    While doping scandals have marred the image of the Olympic Games in past years, organizers of the 2012 Games in London are bracing for a new type of scandal: gambling. Minister for sport Hugh Robertson believes that contest-fixing will become a bigger concern, both to the Olympic Games and sports in general, as illegal betting syndicates in India and other parts of the Far East grow unchecked. He expects at least £300M ($467M) to be wagered in Britain alone during the London Games - which run from July 27 to Aug. 12. Spot-betting, in which wagers are placed not on the outcome of a contest but the occurrence or timing of a particular incident or event within a contest, is of particular concern, says the minister, recalling the November arrest of three Pakistani cricket players for spot-fixing during a 2010 match.

  • Athletic Departments and First Amendment Rights of Student Journalists

    by Paul Steinbach October 2011

    Aaron Smith was looking forward to joining a dozen or so members of the mainstream media at a scheduled gathering of University of Kentucky men's basketball players, each of whom would be available for eight-minute one-on-one interviews.

  • Administrators to High School Cheerleaders: Cover Up

    by Michael Popke — AB Managing Editor September 2011

    Cheerleaders in high schools from coast to coast are in danger of losing the privilege of wearing their uniforms to school on game days, as administrators crack down on dress-code violations.

  • Blog: 'Lunkheads' Judged in 'Judgement Free Zone'

    by Rob Bishop and Barry Klein September 2011

    It was great watching "The Daily Show" skewer Planet Fitness - home of the Judgement Free Zone® - for discriminating against "lunkheads," deadlifters serious enough to make noise while they work out.

  • California Lags in Regulating Athletic Trainers

    by Michael Popke August 2011

    In May 2009, Tommy Mallon was playing in his final high school lacrosse game for Santa Fe Christian in Solana Beach, Calif., when he collided with an opposing player as both were scrambling for a bouncing ball.

  • Is North Carolina's New Concussion Law Best in the Country?

    by Michael Popke — AB Managing Editor June 2011

    The Gfeller-Waller Concussion Act - named after two football players who died after suffering concussions in 2009 - was signed into law by North Carolina Gov. Bev Perdue late last week. Every member of the state's House and Senate endorsed the law, which head-injuries expert Kevin Guskiewicz calls the best in the country.

  • Transgender Student-Athlete Leaves GW Basketball Program

    by Paul Steinbach May 2011

    As the issue of how transgender student-athletes fit into the organized sports landscape continues to evolve at both the college and high school levels, the collegiate ranks lost one such athlete this week.