• Blog: New Tennis Rules Deserve Your Attention

    by Mary Helen Sprecher January 2011

    Unless you've been living in a fallout shelter, you've heard about tennis making a comeback in the U.S. There are more players on the courts, new American faces on the pro tour and recently, an uptick in U.S. apparel sales. That's all good news if you have tennis courts, and better still if you have team or league programming, Tennis On Campus, or instruction on any level.

  • New Report Urges Transgender Student-Athlete Policies

    by Michael Popke October 2010

    In what is being hailed as a "groundbreaking report" on transgender student-athletes, a new document sponsored by the National Center for Lesbian Rights and the It Takes A Team! initiative of the Women's Sports Foundation, urges high school and college athletic associations to adopt standard policies to provide transgender student-athletes fair and equal opportunities to participate on sports teams. The free report, "On the Team: Equal Opportunities for Transgender Student Athletes," was released Monday and is intended to provide leaders in education and athletics with the information to make effective policy decisions about the participation of transgender student-athletes in high school and college athletic programs. "Educators and parents must be open to this challenge if we are to create educational institutions that value and meet the needs of all students," says report co-author Pat Griffin, former director of It Takes A Team!, an educational campaign designed to end homophobia in sports.

  • Anti-Discrimination Laws Trump Town's Gender-Based Tournaments

    by John T. Wolohan September 2010

    Anti-discrimination laws trump a town's longstanding policy of holding gender-based tournaments.

  • SEC to MSU: Less Cowbell

    by Paul Steinbach August 2010

    The Southeastern Conference has announced a fine structure for the inappropriate use of what it calls "traditional institutional noise makers" at SEC sporting events.

  • Stakeholders Meet to Address Agent Issue

    by Paul Steinbach August 2010

    Representatives from the National Collegiate Athletic Association, National Football League, NFL Players Association, American Football Coaches Association and sports agent community met Monday to discuss their shared responsibility in addressing improper agent activity within the sport of football - described by the NCAA as "an age-old problem that not just one group or organization can solve on its own." The unprecedented meeting is expected to be the first of several discussions with the goal of identifying points of collaboration and potential solutions.

  • Big Foot May Cost Prep Football Player His Season

    by Michael Popke August 2010

    Connor Duffy, a junior tackle for Kingsway Regional High School in Woolwich Township, N.J., stands 6-feet, 8-inches tall, weighs 300 pounds and wears a size 22 shoe. That's the problem: Duffy, his parents and coach Tony Barchuk can't seem to find cleats that fit.

  • Quinnipiac Will Keep Women's Volleyball, Cheer

    by Michael Popke August 2010

    Following a court order to bring its athletics programs into compliance with federal gender-equity requirements, Quinnipiac University plans to keep its women's volleyball team and its competitive cheer squad. Under a plan filed in federal court on Wednesday, the university also proposed adding women's golf and rugby teams to provide more athletic opportunities for female students.

  • 2010 World Cup Leaves Behind Environmental Legacy

    by Andrew Cohen July 2010

    Soccer's biggest event may have heightened awareness of important advances to aid the African continent.

  • Baseball to Begin Testing for Human Growth Hormone

    by Michael Popke July 2010

    Major League Baseball on Thursday became the first North American professional sports league to test for human growth hormone. Commissioner Bud Selig announced that blood testing for HGH will begin immediately as part of the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. The blood testing is limited to minor league players because they are not members of the players' association, which means that testing is not subject to collective bargaining. Testing in the minor leagues will allow Selig to see how the test works on a trial basis before asking the players' union to agree to testing, The New York Times reports.

  • Heavy Metal: NFHS Bans Composite Bats

    by Michael Popke July 2010