RECENT ARTICLES
  • Fitness Enthusiasts Disappointed as 'Yoga Tax' Approved

    by Andrea Noble, THE WASHINGTON TIMES June 2014

    D.C. lawmakers gave final approval on Tuesday to the city's $10.6 billion spending plan, which includes a package of broad cuts to income and business taxes but expands sales taxes to some new services such as health clubs.

  • USC to Offer Four-Year Scholarships in Revenue Sports

    by Michael Gaio June 2014

    The University of Southern California is joining a short list of Division I schools offering student-athletes an added sense of security with its scholarship offers.

  • N.C. High Schools Hope to Meet Title IX Standards with Stunt

    by Andrew Brandt June 2014

    In 2010, the Office of Civil Rights deemed that both traditional and competitive cheerleading did not meet the requirements of Title IX to be considered sports.

    The sport called stunt, a cross between gymnastics and competitive cheerleading, has been constructed to meet those standards.

    Related: Cheer Evolving, But Will NCAA Call It an Emerging Sport?

    According to The State, stunt will begin making waves across Wake County, N.C. high schools next spring. The sport will consist of both regular head-to-head matches and competitions, which will be divided into four parts: partner stunts, pyramids and tosses, group jumps and tumbling and team performance.

    By beginning in the spring, stunt won’t have to jockey for gym time with existing sports like basketball and volleyball. And like diving, stunt scores will be determined by mastery. Rather than create new moves, participants are required to perfect particular routines.

    Wake County will be the first in the state to offer stunt as a competitive sport, and their hope that it introduces more girls to interscholastic athletics is a promising one. “There is a tremendous amount of interest in it,” said Darren Coe, the Wake County Schools senior administrator for athletics.

    Related: AMA: Cheerleading as Rigorous, Risky as Any Sport

    Previously, Wake County didn’t have a high enough percentage of girls competing to meet Title IX standards. And the North Carolina High School Athletic Association currently hosts championships in 11 sports for boys—and only 10 for girls.

    If stunt raises enough interest, however, it could very well become sport number 11 for girls. Here’s to hoping stunt becomes something greater than its name suggests.

     

  • Hearing Officer: Sandusky Deserves $4,900/Mo. Pension

    by Allison Steele; Inquirer Staff Writer June 2014

    In an opinion released Monday, the examiner recommended the state employees' retirement system reinstate the $4,900-a-month pension Sandusky collected before being convicted on child sex abuse charges in 2012.

  • For Teams, There's Life After Dropping Offensive Mascots

    by Mary Sanchez, Dayton Daily News (Ohio) June 2014

    Daniel M. Snyder, the beleaguered owner of Washington's National Football League franchise, had a setback this week when the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office deemed the team's name trademark "disparaging" and unworthy of protection.

  • Columnist: Patent Office 'Redskins' Ruling is Offensive

    by Rich Lowry June 2014

    The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office's contribution to the Washington Redskins debate is pettifogging absurdity in the service of rank politically correct bullying.

  • Beer and Wine Sales Trending at College Stadiums

    by Dan Wolken, USA TODAY Sports June 2014

    Southern Methodist's Rick Hart and Texas A&M's Eric Hyman run athletics departments that share a state, once shared a conference and still have enough in common to play each other in multiple sports, including football this season. But Texas A&M fans who land tickets to their team's Sept. 20 game at SMU's Ford Stadium will have the opportunity to do something that is forbidden in the Aggies stadium: buy a beer. After a successful trial run during basketball season that netted the athletics department a six-figure windfall over the course of 12games, SMU is one of a handful of schools that will begin selling beer and wine at its on-campus stadium. And with athletics departments getting ready to absorb multimillion-dollar obligations in new player benefits thanks to a wave of litigation and NCAA restructuring, it's plausible that others might soon follow suit.

  • AD: Ban on Parent-Coaches Would Devastate Teams

    by Post & Courier June 2014

    A proposal to ban so-called dad coaches from high school sports in Berkeley County has some residents riled up, and some athletic directors and coaches concerned. The Berkeley County school board, which meets Tuesday night in Moncks Corner, is considering a proposal that would prevent volunteer coaches from coaching their own children at the varsity and junior varsity levels. More than 350 people have signed a petition at change.org to protest the idea. The children of Berkeley County deserve to have as many programs available to them as possible, Moncks Corner resident Sally Wofford wrote in the petition. Banning parent coaches will reduce the number of teams.

  • Chiropractors, Doctors at Odds Over New Concussion Law

    by Laura A. Bischoff June 2014

    Tanya Clark of Harrison Twp. talks to her son, Justin, at a summer league basketball game. Justin Clark, a 2013 Chaminade Julienne High School graduate, suffered a concussion during a 2012 game . COLUMBUS - Ohio's new law requiring that young athletes be pulled from practice or play if they appear to have suffered a concussion is likely to get a mini-makeover because of a dispute over who should be allowed to clear injured kids to return to competition. Chiropractors want in on the action. Medical doctors want to keep them on the sidelines, saying that chiropractors lack the training and expertise to diagnose and treat brain injuries in young athletes.

  • Will Redskins Trademark Ruling Impact Prep Level?

    by BOB McGOVERN June 2014

    Bay State high school logos from the Tewksbury Redmen to the Wakefield Warriors could be history after yesterday's bombshell trademark ruling against the Washington Redskins breathed new life into the fight against Native American mascots, said two opposing advocates. More than 40 high schools in Massachusetts use Native American images or names - but maybe not for long after the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office ruled the Redskins name is offensive.