RECENT ARTICLES
  • Toronto's Pan Am Stadium Unfinished, Contractor Unpaid

    by Rexford Sheild July 2014

    With less than a year left until Toronto hosts the 2015 soccer Pan American Games, completion deadlines for six new athletic venues under construction are quickly coming... and going. Nearly all of the venues are facing a one- to two-month delay, but for the contractor in charge of Tim Hortons Field, the games' key venue and home to the Canadian Football League's Hamilton Tiger-Cats, the delays are really hitting where it hurts -- the pocketbook. 

    While traditional construction contracts stipulate that companies are paid on a monthly basis until construction is complete, Ontario Sports Solutions' contract with Infrastructure Ontario stipulated that the bulk of the amount -- $89 million (Canadian) would be paid upon completion. But the June 30 completion date has come and gone, forcing the company to borrow from lines of credit and find other other ways of covering their costs. 

    "You want (OSS) to suffer a financial hit as a result of not being done on time, and he's suffering that right now," IO executive vice president John McKendrick said of Jean-Louis Fuz of Bouygues Canada, part of the OSS consortium. "He has to finance all that money. He has to borrow it." 

    All parties involved knew there was going to be some sort of delay in the construction process, stemming from a winter ice storm and problems with the subcontractors. Still, the delay had a catastrophic financial effect. The Tiger-Cats' first home games, scheduled for July 26 and 31, have had to be moved to the significantly smaller stadium at McMaster University, and will not be broadcast on  ESPN as planned. 

    Organizers will meet next week to discuss if the stadium will be completed to the extent needed for the August 16 game, but Fuz noted that it's just a matter of "finishing the job," brought forth by the presence of 580 workers on the site each day. Altogether, OSS will suffer even more if the stadium isn't done by the deadline established, as the company will have to pay the Tiger-Cats $1 million for each home game missed.

    All venues are expected to be ready for next summer's Pan Am Games despite the delays, which are still rather minimal in comparison to the turmoil and chaos that defined World Cup stadium construction in Brazil.

     


    Rexford Sheild is an intern with Athletic Business.

  • New Vikings Stadium a 'Death Trap' for Birds?

    by Michael Gaio July 2014

    The new home of the Minnesota Vikings, set to open in 2016, will feature 200,000 square feet of glass. In fact, its 95-foot high pivoting doors at the main entrance will be among the largest moving glass doors in the world. All that glass, plus the world's largest transparent ethylene-tetraflouroethylene (ETFE) roof, is designed to give spectators the feeling of being outdoors, while still enjoying a climate-controlled environment.

    Great design, or one for the birds? Yes and no.

  • Synthetic Turf Install Complete at Notre Dame Stadium

    by Michael Gaio July 2014

    It's a new era for Notre Dame football. The team took to Twitter Thursday morning to give the world its first look at the newly installed FieldTurf at Notre Dame Stadium.

  • Detroit Red Wings to Build New Arena

    by Rexford Sheild July 2014

    One of the NHL's original-six teams will be moving, albeit within the city, as the Detroit Red Wings are headed from Joe Louis Arena to a new arena in 2017. The move is expected to generate $1.8 billion in economic impact. 

  • Singapore's New National Stadium + Philippine Arena

    by Andrew Brandt July 2014

    It's been a big two months for record-breaking stadiums. 

  • Tightening Front-Line Security in Stadiums, Arenas

    by Paul Steinbach July 2014

    Editor's note: This story originally appeared in Sports Venue Safety, a new supplement to Athletic Business. View the entire digital issue here.

    Among the noteworthy numbers to emerge from Super Bowl XLVIII in New Jersey last February — along with 48 (the number of points racked up by the Seattle Seahawks) and 8 (the Denver Broncos' meager output) and 49 (the surprisingly agreeable game-time temperature) — was this lesser-known figure: 10. That was the reported number of arrests made at MetLife Stadium security checkpoints that day — most for disorderly conduct, drug possession or trespassing.

  • Ralph Wilson Stadium to Host HS Football Kickoff Event

    by Miguel Rodriguez; News Sports Reporter July 2014

    The goal for all high school football teams in Western New York is to reach The Ralph to play for championships, but several teams will begin their quests for crowning glory at the home of the Buffalo Bills this season.

  • Opinion: Levi's Stadium Lives Up to Niners', NFL's Hype

    by Mark Purdy, San Jose Mercury News July 2014

    As predicted, when it came to the celebration and platitudes at Thursday's official 49ers stadium ribbon cutting, the platitudes won. In fact, you could say the platitudes won big. They won bigger than big, big, big. "It's the most unbelievable outdoor entertainment facility in the world," said Jed York, the 49ers' chief executive officer, during one of the dedication speeches.

  • Real Salt Lake Eyes State Fairgrounds for New Stadium

    by Aaron Falk The Salt Lake Tribune July 2014

    Professional soccer may indeed be played at the Utah State Fairgrounds. Years after officials examined the possibility of building a stadium for Real Salt Lake on Salt Lake City's west side, the team's new owner wants to construct a stadium there for a minor league affiliate. RSL owner Dell Loy Hansen wants to create a public-private partnership with the Fairpark Corporation to construct a multi-use sports stadium that could hold up to 8,000 people. The stadium would be home to RSL's minor league affiliate, with hopes of opening play there in time for the 2016 season.

  • Reps from Three Cities Offer Milwaukee Arena Advice

    by JASON SILVERSTEIN, jsilverstein@journalsentinel.com Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Staff, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel July 2014

    proposals for a new multipurpose arena for the Bucks As Milwaukee considers and other cultural amenities, the city could learn a few things from Cleveland. And from Denver. And from Oklahoma City, too. City officials here had that opportunity Friday when leaders from those three cities visited the Marcus Center for the Performing Arts' Todd Wehr Theater for a discussion on how to fund major cultural projects. Although the discussion - led by Timothy Sheehy, president of the Metropolitan Milwaukee Association of Commerce - was not tied to any particular projects in Milwaukee, much of the talk inevitably returned to the new Bucks arena, which is still in preliminary planning. Sheehy said near the end of the talk that the arena could be a project that helps Milwaukee evolve from being a large Wisconsin city to "more of a global player" in entertainment.