RECENT ARTICLES
  • Facility Madness 2014: At-Large Region

    by AB Staff March 2014

    First round voting is now closed. Click here to vote in our Sweet 16.

    At-Large Region: Whether it’s unique design, incredible size or storied college basketball tradition, these venues have earned their place among college basketball’s best.

  • Facility Madness 2014: Renovated Region

    by AB Staff March 2014

    First round voting is now closed. Click here to vote in our Sweet 16.

    Renovated Region: Historic charm with a new-school twist. Major financial investments turned these facilities from pretenders to contenders in college basketball’s facilities arms race. Help us determine which facilities should advance to the next round.

  • Facility Madness 2014: Old-School Region

    by AB Staff March 2014

    First round voting is now closed. Check back Friday to vote in our Sweet 16.

    The Old-School Region: College’s basketball’s classic cathedrals, — these facilities have endured the test of time. Tell us which venues deserve to move on to the next round of Facility Madness.

  • Showtime: Turn Playing Surfaces into 3-D Video Boards

    by Michael Gaio March 2014

    Hardwood ripples. Free-throw lanes rise. Game footage rolls and championship banners unfurl in an unexpected space — the playing surface. Welcome to the next generation of in-arena entertainment.

  • Cracking $60M Stadium May Require Partial Teardown

    by Emily Attwood March 2014

    When “extensive cracking” in the concrete closed down Allen (Tex.) High School’s Eagle Stadium last month, no one knew just how serious the damage was, but anyone could guess fixing it wouldn’t be easy. The full report from Nelson Forensics on the stadium’s condition was released on Wednesday, and the news isn’t good. 


     

    According to the report, the damage was the result of "drying shrinkage of the concrete” — that is, the concrete was poorly cured. Cracks range in size from hairline to a third of an inch and have allowed water to seep into the floor joist system, causing further structural weakening. 

    "The cracking has decreased the service life of the structure and potentially decreased its structural capacity," the report says.

    Nelson Forensics proposed four possible solutions. The first and most expensive would be to completely tear down and rebuild the concourse level, replacing concrete slabs and adding additional fixes to the floor joist system. While it would also take the most time to complete, it would provide a long-term fix. 

    RELATED: Pogue Construction's Statement Regarding Allen Eagle Stadium

    The other options would provide different variations of temporary, bandaid fixes, relying on epoxy injections to seal the cracks. While each would be cheaper than partial reconstruction and be accomplished in less time, each would need to be redone on a regular basis.

    Additional testing is expected to take months to complete at an estimated cost of $100,000. The school district has not yet made a decision on what action it will take, nor whether the stadium will be open for the fall athletics season. 

     

  • Blog: Contract at Your Own Risk

    by Ralph Agostinelli March 2014

    Online continuing education courses have become a regular part of my life thanks in part to the New Jersey legislature, which passed a law setting down ongoing professional competency requirements for professional engineers licensed there. Recently, I took a course on change orders — work that is added to or deleted from the original scope of a contract — the gist of which seemed to be, “How to make sure you [that is, engineers] don’t get hit with a claim for negligence because you didn’t design something properly.”

  • 'Extensive Cracking' Closes $60M High School Stadium

    by Michael Gaio February 2014

    Remember when Allen (Texas) High School's football stadium was making headlines for its price tag? The 18,000-seat stadium cost $60 million to build and opened in August of 2012. Today its making headlines for all the wrong reasons.

  • Designing for Parking and Fan Traffic at Spectator Venues

    by Paul Steinbach February 2014

    When Levi’s Stadium in Santa Clara, Calif., hosts its first San Francisco 49ers football game later this year, it will represent a substantial upgrade over storied Candlestick Park in many ways. Boasting nearly twice the square footage of the Niners’ old home, Levi’s Stadium will offer more of just about everything except seats — from elevators and escalators to concessions points of sale and restrooms. It will also offer more parking — 21,000 spaces compared to 18,000.

  • Video: Down Goes the Metrodome

    by Michael Gaio February 2014

    The 32-year-old Metrodome is dying a slow and painful death. What was once home to more than 300 events a year, "The Dome" as Minnesotans called it, is on its way to becoming nothing more than a pile of rubble. The stadium is coming down in pieces as the Vikings build their new stadium on the same site.

  • Texas A&M Adding Largest Video Board Among Colleges

    by Michael Gaio February 2014

    Texas A&M is going all out with its makeover of Kyle Field. Already a revered stadium in college football with a capacity of 82,589, Texas A&M is spending $450 million to expand and improve the venue.