A new type of magnetic stimulation therapy may dramatically reduce symptoms of concussion, according to a new study published in the Journal of Neurotrauma. 

The study found that magnetic stimulation using a laptop-style device for 20 minutes per day improved the ability of rodents with concussion to walk in a straight line, navigate a maze, run on a wheel, and perform cognitive tests. 

"Concussion is a major health concern effecting all sections of society from children whose brain is still developing to older people suffering falls," professor Changiz Taghibiglou, who led the research, told Science Daily. "The beauty of this therapy is not only that it is effective, but that it is non-invasive, easy to use and cost-effective." 

The study also found that Low Frequency Magnetic Stimulation could protect the brain from future degeneration, which is a risk after suffering a concussion.

After about four days of treatment, rodents with repeated concussion had their ability to perform a variety of tasks restored to almost normal levels.

In the next stages of the research program, the USask team plans to conduct longer-term tests on rodents, followed by human trials.

Andy Berg is Executive Editor of Athletic Business.