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The University of Louisville basketball program is expected to receive a notice of allegations from the NCAA stemming from a yearlong investigation into an alleged prostitution scandal.

The notice, which is expected to be made public on Thursday according to the Courier-Journal, will detail the findings from the NCAA investigation into claims that a former Louisville staffer paid escorts to have sex with recruits and players.

In February, the university acknowledged that it was likely that violations occurred, and then-university president James Ramsey acted to self-impose a postseason ban on the basketball team. Other self-imposed penalties were later announced, including limitations on recruiting and reducing scholarships.

A notice of allegations merely details the facts of the case, and outlines which rules may have been broken, but does not prescribe penalties. Once a school receives a notice, it has 90 days to respond or dispute the details of the investigation before the case goes before the NCAA committee on infractions, which ultimately hands out penalties. 

Depending on the severity of the infractions, Louisville could be subject to more severe penalties or sanctions or none at all, after the self-imposed penalties. Louisville could be subject to additional postseason bans or victory forfeitures from previous seasons if it’s found that players received improper benefits.

A hearing for the case likely won’t happen until spring or summer of 2017.

Jason Scott is Online Managing Editor of Athletic Business.