While the 2018 World Cup begins today with a match between Russia and Saudi Arabia, the 2026 World Cup in North America will begin in just 2,900 days. Hosted by Canada, Mexico and the United States, here's a look at the cities and venues in the running to host matches in 2026: 

United States (10 to be selected)

  • Atlanta (Mercedes-Benz Stadium): 71,000 capacity
  • Baltimore (M&T Bank Stadium): 71,006 capacity
  • Boston (Gillette Stadium): 65,878 capacity (expandable to 70,000)    
  • Cincinnati (Paul Brown Stadium): 65,515 capacity (expandable to 67,402)  
  • Dallas (AT&T Stadium): 80,000 capacity 
  • Denver (Sports Authority Field at Mile High): 76,125 capacity (expandable to 77,595)   
  • Houston (NRG Stadium): 71,795 capacity (expandable to 72,220)  
  • Kansas City (Arrowhead Stadium): 76,416 capacity
  • Los Angeles (Rose Bowl): 92,000 capacity
  • Miami (Hard Rock Stadium): 64,767 capacity (expandable to 67,518)  
  • Nashville (Nissan Stadium): 69,143 capacity (expandable to 75,000)    
  • New York/New Jersey (MetLife Stadium): 82,500 capacity (expandable to 87,157)   
  • Orlando (Camping World Stadium): 60,219 capacity (expandable to 65,000)
  • Philadelphia (Lincoln Financial Field): 69,176 capacity (expandable to 69,328)   
  • San Francisco (Levi's Stadium): 68,500 capacity (expandable to 75,000)
  • Seattle (CenturyLink Field): 69,000 capacity (expandable to 72,000)
  • Washington, D.C. (FedExField): 82,000 capacity

Mexico (3 venues)

  • Guadalajara (Estadio Akron): 46,232 capacity (expandable to 48,071) 
  • Mexico City (Estadio Azteca): 87,523 capacity
  • Monterrey (Estadio BBVA Bancomer): 53,500 capacity

Canada (3 venues)

  • Edmonton (Commonwealth Stadium): 56,302 capacity
  • Montreal (Olympic Stadium): 61,004 capacity (expandable to 73,000)
  • Toronto (BMO Field): 30,000 capacity (expandable to 45,500)  

Andy Berg is Executive Editor of Athletic Business.