Andy Berg
Andy Berg (andy@athleticbusiness.com) joined Athletic Business as Executive Editor in May of 2017. Andy brings 10 years of B2B publishing experience to AB. In 2008, he began as an associate editor for Advantage Business Media’s Wireless Week brand, which covers the wireless communications industry. From there, Andy took over the executive editor position at Wireless Week and CED Magazine. In 2015, Andy moved within Advantage Business Media to become Editorial Director for the company’s Manufacturing vertical, which is comprised of seven brands positioned across the manufacturing sector.
  • Thursday, July, 13, 2017
    Detroit Partners with Schools to Double Rec Centers

    Detroit is set to more than double the city’s public rec centers this summer.

    A partnership between the city of Detroit and Detroit Public Schools Community District will grow the number of public rec centers, which serve children ages 6 to 17, from 11 to 27 locations.

    Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan said the new rec centers are an important part of revitalizing the area.

    “Detroiters all remember when rec centers across this city shut down,” Duggan said in a joint statement with the DPSCD. “If we are going to build a stronger Detroit, we’ve got to focus on creating safe spaces for our youth and opportunities for them to be successful.”

    Detroit shut down 16 recreation centers due to funding cuts from 2006-2013. In order to provide more recreation opportunities for Detroit children this summer, the city approached DPS officials about partnering to provide Detroit youth more options more quickly. The cost of the five-week program is approximately $625,000 or about $40,000 per location for the summer. 

    “When the mayor's team approached us with this concept we moved with a sense of urgency to ensure that as many students as possible continued to have access to a safe and productive learning environment while parents and caregivers work over the summer,” said DPSCD Superintendent Dr. Nikolai Vitti in a statement. “I believe this is the first of many partnerships between the city and school district to better utilize and share resources to support our students and communities.”

    The 16 new locations will be called “Summer Fun Centers.” Those centers will be in addition to the existing 11 traditional recreation centers. The city has hired 190 “Play Leaders” and supervisory staff to provide adult oversight and structure to the programming. 

    After the five-week pilot has ended, the City and DPSCD will evaluate the approach as a possible long-term solution toward filling the recreation center gap that has existed in many neighborhoods for more than a decade.


  • Wednesday, July, 12, 2017
    Coach Pleads in Sexting Case, Avoids 'Sex Offender' Tag

    Players of Bartholomew McInerney, the former baseball coach at St. Rose High School in Belmar, NJ, can finally move on with their lives.

    McInerney, also known as “Coach Bart,” pleaded guilty to 10 counts of child endangerment, bringing to an end a case that has dragged the St. Rose community through scandal for the past seven years.

    McInerney will not have to register as a sex offender, as he agreed to a low-level fourth-degree offense. Sentencing is scheduled for Aug. 25 in Middlesex County Superior Court.

    Prosecutors alleged McInerney encouraged and sometimes paid his players to pleasure themselves, as well as report on their sexual activities through text messages. Prosecutors alleged this was for McInerney’s own pleasure, but McInerney’s lawyers argued that he did it to help the boys abstain from premarital sex.

    McInerney’s lawyer, Edward Bertucio, told the Asbury Park Press, that McInerney wanted to get the case behind him and allow the players affected by his actions to do the same. “He had the best of intentions, but he realized he wasn’t the person to give the advice he was giving.”

    On the stand, McInerney said that the conversations should have been between his underage players and their parents or health professional.

    Allegations of McInerney’s misconduct first surfaced in 2007 after he took a number of St. Rose baseball players to tournaments in Alaska and Hawaii. In 2008, Andrew M. Clark, the first of McInerney’s players to speak to investigators about his coach’s alleged misconduct, was killed after he stepped in front of an oncoming train. Clark’s family sued McInerney, St. Rose and the Diocese of Trenton, alleging wrongful death, and were subsequently awarded $900,000.

    McInerney’s was initially found guilty of child endangerment in 2010. He was sentenced to 18 years in prison, but an appeals court threw out his conviction, ruling that a judge had given improper instructions to the jury.


  • Tuesday, July, 11, 2017
    Arlington Reworks AT&T Debt to Fund Rangers' $1B Park

    The city of Arlington, Texas, is getting creative with its finances as it shuffles around some debt to pay for a new $1B Texas Rangers stadium.

    According to a report from the Star-Telegram, which examined documents approved at a June 27 City Council meeting, Arlington is set to use a half-cent sales tax, 2 percent hotel tax and 5 percent car-rental tax to fund up to $500 million of the Rangers' new stadium. The Rangers have agreed to carry the remaining cost.

    Arlington is currently using those tax revenues to pay off the city’s $325 million commitment to AT&T Stadium, where the Dallas Cowboys play. The city will pull back on the accelerated payments it’s currently making to the Cowboys’ facility and use the savings to start construction on the new Rangers stadium.

    AB Stadium Spotlight

    Arlington has $147 million remaining on AT&T Stadium. The plan is to refinance that debt and extend the original payoff date to 2034. The city began paying on the 30-year note in 2005 but was on track to have it paid off by 2021, having already realized $118 million in savings through its aggressive payments.

    The Star reports that the Rangers have agreed to a $100 million buyout price for the stadium should they decide to do so when the lease expires in 2054.

    The city council has also approved the Rangers' proposed 10 percent admission tax and a $3 parking tax on game days to help cover its share of the facility. The Rangers, however, haven’t decided yet whether they will actually implement that revenue stream. Rob Matwick, vice president of business operations for the Rangers told the Star that the team is still “working through” its funding agreements and will make “those decisions soon.”

    The original proposal for the Rangers' stadium had been a 38,000-seat venue, but Matwick said the team may increase that number. “It’s been a give-and-take while we’re in the design process,” he said. “I would say that in the next two months we’ll be much closer to a definitive number. But I expect it to fall in the 40,000-42,000 range.”

    The Rangers currently play at the 49,115-seat Globe Life Park in Arlington, which opened April 1, 1994. 


  • Tuesday, July, 11, 2017
    Video: Dave Castro Talks Bringing CrossFit Games to Madison

    If you’re looking for the fittest people on earth, you could do worse than venturing to Madison, Wis., this August. No, it’s not that beer, cheese and sausage comprise the diet of champions but rather that the 2017 Reebok CrossFit Games (Aug. 3-6) have relocated to Madison’s Alliant Energy Center.


  • Tuesday, July, 11, 2017
    Branding Is All About Change

    As I sat down to write this Editor's Note for Athletic Business, I couldn't help but reflect on the inevitability of change. AB's branding issue is all about how high schools, universities and rec centers implement changes to shape, refine and, in some cases, redefine perceptions of their institutions. From something as small as a logo redesign to a massive branding overhaul of an entire facility, change comes in all shapes and sizes and for varying reasons.


  • Monday, July, 10, 2017
    Missouri Slashes College Athletics Budgets

    Missouri is slashing state funding to higher education and much of that money is coming from the state's college athletics programs.

    In order to balance Missouri’s state budget, Governor Eric Greitens cut $251 million in spending, $36 million of which was gouged from higher education.

    According to a report from the Kansas City Star, public colleges and universities at all levels will feel the pinch. Missouri State has cut its field hockey team and UMKC will be without cheerleaders.

    In 2016, UMKC had an athletic budget of $14.7 million. This year, the school will have to trim $1.5 million from its athletics budget. Dropping the cheerleading squad will trim $45,000 and affect 20 squad members.

    Cheerleading coach Dawn Todd told the Star she was “shocked” by news her program was being cut. “It wasn’t just losing a team, it’s been part of my life,” she said.

    After eliminating five full-time positions, UMKC is also looking at ways to shore up travel expenses. As part of the Western Athletic Conference, UMKC competes with schools on the West Coast, including California and Washington. Athletic Director Carla Wilson said the cuts have been difficult. “It’s been very tough work, and it’s not over. Resources are tight. We’re working on this every single day,” Wilson said.

    From ABCollege Teams Facing Charter Plane Shortage

    Missouri State, which had a 2016 budget of $26.2 million, is also being squeezed. The school has reduced expenses in each of its athletic programs by 7-12 percent. It’s also cut scholarships and restructured some aid programs for student athletes. 

    Missouri State also cut its field hockey team, which saved about $1.1 million and included a roster of 17, including 12 scholarship athletes. Athletic director Kyle Moats said, “Cutting a sport is the worst thing you can do as an athletic director. It’s the toughest thing to do and there was nobody who wanted that.”

    Mizzou, which enjoyed $97 million in revenue from the SEC in 2016, is also looking at ways to save. The Tigers are cutting some technology upgrades and other equipment purchases, which will shave about $1.4 million in spending in the coming year. 


  • Friday, July, 07, 2017
    Raiders, Rebels Talk Parking, Other Stadium Concerns

    The former Oakland Raiders organization and UNLV are confronting many challenges that will come with a planned $1.9 billion joint-use stadium.


  • Thursday, July, 06, 2017
    Top 10 Cities for Recreation in 2017

    Top 10 Cities for Recreation

    Source: WalletHub

  • Wednesday, July, 05, 2017
    Colorado Sees First Female High School Football Coach

    Colorado's first female high school head football coach has been hired.

    According to a report from Boulder’s Daily Camera, Beth Buglione has signed on as the head football coach at Nederland High School.

    A lifelong football fan, Buglione knows the sport. She played three years at quarterback for the Corvallis Pride in Oregon as part of the Independent Women’s Football League. Buglione eventually went on to become the coach, general manager and owner of the Pride until the team folded in 2009.

    Buglione comes to the Nederland position from a head coaching position at Sheridan High School in Oregon. She told the Daily Camera that she never intended to “put the spotlight on me and to prove that women can do the job… I was just following my passion.”

    The move to hire Buglione was not without controversy. Outgoing coach Aaron Jones’s dismissal late last year was met with outcry from some students and parents in the community. Jones had been coach of the team for 11 years, and a change.org petition to restore him as the team's coach garnered 271 signatures.

    Jones said that he respected the decision that was made to remove him and wishes “nothing but the most success to the Panthers, to Coach B and to my community.”

    Buglione said she appreciated that people wanted Jones to stay and hopes that those “wounds will heal” once the team is “headed in the right direction.” 


  • Friday, June, 30, 2017
    AB Stadium Spotlight: Hawks Go Big with Arena Renovation

    AB Stadium Spotlight


  • Wednesday, November, 08, 2017
    Letter from the Editor: Common Ground

    It's an interesting time to be part of this industry. In recent months, sport has again realized its platform as an effective channel for social and cultural debate. Whether or not you feel strongly about protests taking place on the sidelines of NFL games — and those at the college and high school levels — it's hard to ignore that this industry finds itself at the epicenter of a politically charged conversation.


  • Monday, October, 09, 2017
    Letter from the Editor: Never Lose Perspective

    Perspective is everything. It's a phrase that went through my head more than once as we put together our annual Facilities of Merit® issue.