RECENT ARTICLES
  • Technology Dictates Update to 30-Minute Lightning Protocol

    by Andy Berg April 2019

    Last October, Pinellas County, Fla., became the only county in the Tampa Bay area to install lightning prediction systems for each of its public high schools. The overall cost for 16 schools came in at a whopping $288,000. As with any big-ticket purchase, there were some who were happy with the decision and others who were not. At the time, head Pinellas Park High School football coach Kenny Crawford told the Tampa Bay Times he thought the system was a waste of money. "Why put in a system that costs so much, when we already have free ones [cell phone apps] that work just as well, if not better?" Crawford complained.

  • Park Ramp Repair Takes Three Years, Costs $3 Million

    by Paul Steinbach February 2019

    Work has reportedly resumed on a ramp in Brooklyn's Shore Road Park that leads to ball fields used by local schools and youth teams, but three years have already elapsed since the ramp was functional, and the repair is expected to cost nearly $3 million.

  • Parents of Drowned Child Sue Club, Others for $56M

    by Paul Steinbach February 2019

    The parents of a five-year-old boy who drowned on the first day of a summer camp hosted by Timberhill Athletic Club in Corvallis, Ore., are suing the club, certain staff members, and state and county authorities for $56.6 million.

  • Severe Weather Safety at Outdoor Venues

    by Brad Nelson September 2017

    Monitoring the weather, understanding the threat and making the call to evacuate for the safety of players and fans is no easy task, and it's one that venue managers must take seriously.

  • Razor Blades Embedded in Slides at Two Texas Parks

    by Courtney Cameron July 2017

    A city maintenance crew in Huntsville, Texas, made a troubling discovery that underlines the need for regular and vigilant safety inspections of municipal playgrounds.

  • Death of Toddler Raises Goal Post Safety Concerns

    by Courtney Cameron May 2017

    Over the weekend in Antioch, Tenn., two-year-old Melanie Rodriguez was killed by a soccer goal when it was blown over by a strong wind, landing on top of her. The accident has gotten people talking about the dangers of unsecured equipment.

  • IRONMAN Director Discusses Event’s Unique Security Challenges

    by Alison Crumpton November 2016

    When we asked John Bertsch, director of public safety emergency management for the IRONMAN Triathlon World Championships, what safety and security issues keep him up at night he chuckled and replied, "A lot. We are on a volcanic island in the middle of the Pacific Ocean with 2,700 world-class athletes representing more than 80 countries ocean swimming 2.4 miles, cycling 112 miles — in 90-degree temperatures and 80 percent humidity — and running a 26.2-mile marathon through the lava fields."

  • Understanding the Latest FAA Drone Regulations

    by Emily Attwood July 2016

    Over the past several years, drones have risen to the top of the threat list for athletic venue operators, leading to venue-specific bans on the devices as well as blanket bans by the FAA at larger sports venues and by the National Park Service outside of designated areas.

  • Preparing for a Weather-Related Stadium Evacuation

    by Emily Attwood February 2016

    Risks at sporting events such as active shooters, bomb threats and fan violence can all be lessened through proper security measures, ensuring a safer sporting event. However, another essential component of emergency action planning — severe weather — is harder to avoid.

  • Chicago Marathon Organizers Share Tips for Event Safety

    by Emily Attwood February 2016

    This past October, the Bank of America Chicago Marathon saw approximately 45,000 participants. The day started with clear skies and a temperature in the mid 50s, climbing into the 70s as the day progressed. The first men's and women's runners crossed the finish line at 2:09:25 and 2:23:23, respectively, and throughout the course of the day, 45 competitors were taken to the hospital and many more treated at aid stations located throughout the course.