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Cowboys Settle Cheerleader Voyeurism Case for $2.4M

Andy Berg
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The Dallas Cowboys agreed to pay $2.4 million to four cheerleaders who accused a senior team executive of watching them undress in their locker room during an event at AT&T Stadium in 2015.

According to ESPN, each of the four cheerleaders received $399,523.27 as their share of the settlement. 

One of the cheerleaders alleges that she saw Richard Dalrymple, the Cowboys’ senior vice president for public relations and communications, standing behind a partial wall in their locker room, pointing his iPhone at them while they were changing. Dalrymple gained entry to the locker room by using a security key card. 

Dalrymple was also accused by a Cowboys fan of taking “upskirt” photos of Charlotte Jones Anderson, a team senior vice president and the daughter of Cowboys owner Jerry Jones. 

Dalrymple has denied all accusations against him. 

"People who know me, co-workers, the media and colleagues, know who I am and what I'm about," Dalrymple said in a statement. "I understand the very serious nature of these claims and do not take them lightly. The accusations are, however, false. One was accidental and the other simply did not happen. Everything that was alleged was thoroughly investigated years ago, and I cooperated fully."

The Cowboys said they investigated both allegations and found no evidence of wrongdoing. 

"The organization took these allegations extremely seriously and moved immediately to thoroughly investigate this matter," said Jim Wilkinson, a communications consultant for the team. "The investigation was handled consistent with best legal and HR practices and the investigation found no evidence of wrongdoing."

Nevertheless, Dalrymple received a formal written warning in October of 2015. 

"If any wrongdoing had been found, Rich would have been terminated immediately," Wilkinson said. "Everyone involved felt just terrible about this unfortunate incident."

Dalrymple announced his retirement on Feb. 2 of this year after 32 years as Jerry Jones’ chief spokesman. ESPN notes that his retirement was not acknowledged by the team and that his retirement came suddenly after ESPN began interviewing people about the case.

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