RECENT ARTICLES
  • Michigan State’s Izzo Decries New NCAA Rules

    by Andy Berg November 2018

    Michigan State men’s head basketball coach Tom Izzo isn’t happy with the officiating at the start of the season, and he’s not blaming the referees.

  • Rowan University Reverses Sports Bra Practice Policy

    by Anna Orso November 2018

    Rowan University will allow female student-athletes to practice in sports bras after an essay by a former women's cross-country runner prompted online outrage.

  • New Mexico Legislator Questions Legality of Sports Lottery

    by T.S. Last November 2018

    At least one New Mexico state legislator thinks the New Mexico Lottery Authority went out of bounds when it authorized a new sports lottery game.

  • ESPN: Athletes More Likely to Be Named in Complaints

    by Paul Steinbach November 2018

    Collegiate student-athletes are about three times more likely than other students to be accused of sexual misconduct or domestic violence in complaints made at Power 5 conference schools, according to an analysis of by ESPN's Outside the Lines.

    The network program sought data from all 65 Power 5 schools, with 32 providing some or all of the information requested. The Title IX complaints spanned the past six years and covered allegations of sexual assault, domestic violence, sexual exploitation, sexual coercion, stalking or retaliation.

    On average, about 6.3 percent of Title IX complaints against students — whether the complaint resulted in a formal investigation or not — included an athlete as the person accused of wrongdoing. Athletes were named in such reports more often than might be expected considering they represent, on average, just 1.7 percent of total student enrollment at the universities.

    W. Scott Lewis, co-founder of the Association of Title IX Administrators and partner with The NCHERM Group consultants, said it can be helpful to know whether a student involved in a Title IX complaint is an athlete, a member of the Greek system, ROTC or any other affiliation so school officials can detect patterns and formate responses. "You're supposed to — when you're dealing with a student — understand the context of that student's experience," Lewis said, "regardless of the action they've been accused of."

    Kansas State University did not have an existing report about complaints against athletes but compiled the data for Outside the Lines anyway. "If we don't know this, we should know this," said Jeff Morris, the school's vice president of communications and marketing. "We should all be paying attention."

  • Opinion: Volleyball Postseason Ban an Overreaction

    by Chicago Daily Herald November 2018

    I try not to make sports the focal part of my column very often, but something happened last week here locally that I simply cannot ignore. The Illinois High School Association, in its infinite wisdom, declared the Pinckneyville High School volleyball team ineligible for postseason competition last week. Executive Director Craig Anderson made his decision based on the fact that the Panthers inadvertently played one more match than the state allows (36 as opposed to 35). Therefore, Anderson said the Panthers had an unfair competitive advantage over the other schools.

  • Courts Not So Quick to Turn Away Trans Students

    by Paul Anderson October 2018

    Mack Beggs has won the Texas girls' 6A high school wrestling championship in the 110-pound weight class for the past two years. Mack would like to wrestle boys, but Mack was born a girl, and a University Interscholastic League rule requires him to wrestle athletes who match the gender on his birth certificate.

  • Bill: Require Sexual Misconduct Training for Coaches

    by Paul Steinbach October 2018

    A lawmaker in Michigan has introduced a bill that would require all of the state's coaches, assistant coaches and athletic trainers of grades K through 12 to undergo training on sexual misconduct.

    State representative Tim Greimel, a Democrat from Auburn Hills, introduced House Bill 6452, which would incorporate the SafeSport online training program or an equivalent program on sexual assault awareness approved by the Michigan Department of Education.

    According to the Holland Sentinel, the U.S. Center for SafeSport began operations in 2017, in the wake of the Larry Nassar scandal that ensnared Michigan State University and USA Gymnastics, with a mission devoted to make athletes’ well-being the centerpiece in sports, protecting athletes from bullying, hazing, sexual misconduct or any form of emotional or physical abuse.

    If the bill, which has been referred to the committee on law and justice, becomes law, the training would have to begin within seven days of an employee's hire date. Current employees would have to complete it within 30 days of the bill being signed into law. All employees would have to provide a certificate of completion to the school district, with failure to do so would resulting in immediate termination.

  • Michigan Coach Quits After Sex with Gymnast Uncovered

    by Paul Steinbach October 2018

    In the latest episode to heap embarrassment on the sport of gymnastics, an assistant coach has left the University of Michigan program after he was discovered having sex in public with an 18-year-old member of the women's team.

    Scott Vetere, 39, a former 10-time All-American gymnast at Michigan, was arrested Oct. 8 after police discovered him performing a sex act on the student-athlete in a car outside an Ann Arbor apartment complex. Vetere was charged with "committing an indecent or obscene act in public" and arraigned last Friday. The female gymnast was also arrested on the same charges. According to the Detroit Free Press, indecent or obscene conduct in public is punishable by up to 90 days in jail and a $500 fine under Ann Arbor city code.

    "Mr. Vetere was immediately suspended the day we learned about the incident (Oct. 10)," Michigan's associate athletic director for external communication and public relations Kurt Svoboda told the Free Press in an email. "He resigned from his position Oct. 15 during the disciplinary review process."

    "We are confident this was an isolated incident and that with his departure, it will not be repeated," Svoboda said, as reported by M Live. "We do very thorough background searches for every employee here."

    Athletic department policy bans coaches from having romantic relationships with athletes. Vetere's bio page has been removed from the university's athletics website.

    A member of the Wolverines' 1999 national championship team, Vetere coached on the Michigan men's team from 2005 to 2009 before joining the women's program as an assistant.

  • MSU Football Fined $10K for Pregame Confrontation

    by Andy Berg October 2018

    The Big Ten has thrown a flag at both the Michigan State and Michigan football teams for their on-field conduct prior to last weekend’s contest at Spartan Stadium in Lansing, Mich.

  • Barnes: Cheating in College Hoops Here to Stay

    by Mike Wilson October 2018

    With more than 40 years spent in the college basketball world, Rick Barnes doesn't believe cheating ever will leave the game. But the Tennessee coach - who says cheating has been going on for 60 years - also doesn't think it's a widespread issue in college basketball as the first trial tied to an FBI investigation into corruption in the sport started in early October.