Colorado State football coach Mike Bobo is taking his lumps after a disappointing 2018 season, and hoping he can reinvigorate his team in leading by example.

According to the Reporter-Herald, Bobo thinks CSU suffered from a lack of accountability in 2018, and he’s turning down a $100,000 raise he was slated for in 2019. Bobo’s salary will remain at the $1.8 million he was paid last year.

"I didn't think we were very disciplined, I didn't think we were very accountable to each other, and ultimately that's my responsibility," Bobo told the Reporter-Herald. "I thought it was a way to show accountability is a two-way street, in my opinion. It's easy to say it's this guy's fault or that guy's fault, but ultimately I'm the guy in charge and made a decision, called Joe on the telephone and told him that's what I wanted to do."

The Rams went 3-9 during the season.

Athletic director Joe Parker said the move validated everything he believed about Bobo when he hired him.

"He said I know I haven't met your expectations, I know I haven't met my own expectations and I don't feel comfortable accepting the raise that's in my employment agreement, so I want to decline that," Parker said. "So, that's what we've done. We've modified his employment agreement so he doesn't receive the raise that was going in this new contract year. That's not typical. That doesn't usually happen. Again, that just makes me realize we have a pretty special person who recognizes his own personal accountability and doesn't feel good about what occurred this season, and is pointing all of his efforts into 2019."

Prior to the season, Bobo was diagnosed with peripheral neuropathy, a condition that caused him to miss 11 days of fall camp. He said the illness had unintended effects on how he approached the season.

"The offseason is part of that, but you kind of form your identity and who you are every year during fall camp," he said. "That was a major setback when I was not in camp, and when I got back, I really wasn't here. That was a tough thing to go through, and I never really could get my hands around this football team.”

Bobo’s decision to turn down the raise won’t affect the buyouts in place on his contract. His original agreement still holds in 2020, when he will make $2 million for the season, and all incentive bonuses are still in line.

Andy Berg is Executive Editor of Athletic Business.