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Private Planes Commonplace on Campus, in Recruiting

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Copyright 2017 Spokane Spokesman-Review

Spokesman Review (Spokane, WA)

 

BOSTON - Once seen as a luxury of the corporate world, private planes are becoming increasingly common at U.S. colleges and universities as schools try to attract athletes, raise money and reward coaches with jet-set vacations.

Some schools spend millions of dollars a year flying their coaches and executives on scores of trips around the country, and some pass the cost on to students and taxpayers.

The Associated Press requested documents from dozens of public universities and found that at least 20 own or share ownership of planes for school business, often employing a few full-time pilots to fly them. Many others charter private flights through outside companies.

Flight logs show that, at times, the aircraft are used for purposes unrelated to university business.

At Ohio State University, which leases one plane and partly owns another, football coach Urban Meyer and members of his family took 11 personal trips last school year, including a vacation in Florida, a weekend getaway to Cape Cod and a spring break in South Carolina. The university's cost: $120,000. Add Meyer's 15 recruiting trips in the same planes during that period, and the price tag jumps to more than $350,000.

Meyer declined to comment.

Some private colleges, which aren't subject to open-records laws, also own planes.

Colleges defend the costs, saying coaches and top administrators need to travel more than ever, while commercial airlines are offering fewer flights. Some say it's economical for officials who often fly on short notice or to towns that are far from a major airport.

But some critics condemn such spending as a luxury at a time when tuition continues to rise.

"The students are paying for it or the taxpayers are paying for it, and it's usually the students," said Richard Vedder, an economist and director of the Center for College Affordability and Productivity in Washington, D.C.

Universities often use planes for athletic recruiting, mostly football and basketball, and to shuttle administrators on trips to woo donors or lobby lawmakers.

Some of the nation's largest schools, such as Penn State and the University of Texas, own planes, as do many smaller schools, including the University of Wyoming and the University of Central Missouri.

The price for a private plane usually reaches into the millions, climbing as high as the $8.4 million that the University of Florida's athletic association paid for an eight-passenger jet in 2011. Then there are operating expenses such as fuel and maintenance, which at Ohio State cost $1.6 million last school year.

Each flight often averages more than $1,000 an hour, far exceeding the cost of a commercial flight.

Purdue University, for example, sent a plane to Providence, Rhode Island, last year to bring alumnus and former NFL lineman Matt Light to Indianapolis for an athletics meeting and then flew him back, at a cost of $15,000. A commercial flight between those cities typically costs less than $400 round-trip.

The University of Minnesota doesn't own a plane but spent $2.9 million chartering flights last year.

To some critics, big spending on airplanes is fine as long as taxpayers don't foot the bill. And some schools, including Ohio State, say private donations and athletic revenue pay for flights. But at many, such as Kansas and Tennessee, they are covered by budgets that include tuition and tax dollars.

"If they're being funded by taxpayers at all, it falls outside the lines of what's proper and ethical in my opinion," said Lawrence McQuillan, a senior fellow at the Independent Institute, a conservative think tank in Oakland, California. "Some of this is just personal vacations, which to me is completely improper for taxpayers to fund."

Zags zip to games

The idea of ditching commercial flights for the convenience of a charter airline is growing in popularity among college sports teams, and Gonzaga is no exception.

Gonzaga works with a company out of Denver that provides a charter plane for the men's and women's basketball team. It started about "five or six years ago," according to deputy director of athletics Chris Standiford, and has greatly benefitted student-athletes who typically miss more class time when flying commercial.

"After a Thursday game, being back for Friday classes is huge for us," said Standiford. "Missed class time really starts to add up (without the charter). We are able to take off right after the game."

Standiford said the charter costs are a separate cost initiative for the athletic department. "Specific donors underwrite our transportation."

The Washington State basketball team has used a charter company in the past, but did not this season. The football team uses a charter from Alaska Airlines for each of its away games and takes off from the Pullman airport if the weather allows.

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February 21, 2017
 
 
 

 

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